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Old 02-28-2012, 12:54 PM   #11
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So it's possible i need a new spring kit, lower front sight, and could be cocking my wrist down?

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Old 02-28-2012, 01:57 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Jhamblen View Post
So it's possible i need a new spring kit, lower front sight, and could be cocking my wrist down?

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It's a new gun, shoot it, get to know the gun before you make any changes.
  • NO new springs, it's a new gun.
  • If you lower the the front sight your dad will shoot high. (see below*)
  • The only change you need should be your experience with this new gun. Get your dad to teach you to shoot. He seems to be doing something right!

You want some real help? Get a friend to video you shooting and post it up. We'll tell you what you're doing wrong!

* About as good a summary as I've ever heard from my friend gorknoids;
The sights on your pistol are probably within a gnat's ass of being perfect. If they are not perfect, at least they are consistent. The other half of the shooting machine (The nut holding the weapon ) will never be perfect or consistent. Like fingerprints, every trigger-squeeze is unique. All of us ( Okay, all but 2 who will deny it) let go a "flyer" every now and then. Some of us (Me) do it more than most, and it's impossible to pinpoint just which one of the variables caused the shot to go wandering. I'm talking about missing the target entirely at 15 yards when you're accustomed to putting half inside the 7 ring or better. I don't count anything inside the 8 because I know it was just luck, because I'm not that good.
The idea is to recognize that you have 2 things working for you (A well-made gun and a stationary target) and about a gazillion things working against you (Distractions, all of your muscles, your eyesight, ADD, whatever) and to work on minimizing the things which work against you. The thing I have found to be the most helpful is rhythmic breathing. It gives me timing, keeps things fluid, and keeps me from fixating on muzzle wobble. See it, shoot it, inhale; see it, shoot it, inhale. Firearm design and ballistics are studies in mathematics, but shooting is Zen. You have to put the human into it, but you can't force the issue. The big thing is to practice a lot so that you're not caught up with the mechanics of the act and more focused on simply recognizing when the shot is going to go where you ask it to.

Under the 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!' column, Let me share this little MSH "fix" I didn't know I needed.

When I first got my Defender I couldn't hit paper with it! The gun had FTF and FTE issues and my cognitive dissonance was screaming what a dumb purchase!!!

My third trip to the range was my turning point. It was a slow day and the Range Officer was hanging around me escaping from the boredom. After watching my frustration he offered this question, "First mouse gun?" My hubris wanted to tell him to go clean up brass but my intellect said help. I said, “Yep.”

He said, “You can’t grip that mini-me like a Government model. Your grip is too low.

He went on to show me how to grip the Defender by jamming my thumb-web into the beavertail first and then let my fingers find their natural placement. He went on to tell me my grip looked good but he bet me he could make it better.

I figured at this point any assistance will help and said, “How?” He explained that he bet my strong side hand was doing all the gripping and that would pull the muzzle off target when the trigger is pulled. Have your weak side hand provide about 60% of the grip pressure.

I ran the remainder of my ammo on target, NO FTF/FTEs, me in amazement and the Range Officer with a big grin on his face!

What’s that cute story have to do with a MSH? OK…OK I’m getting to it!

My hands were obviously too big for this 3” 1911. In search for a fix I thought the addition of a magwell would add to the length of the Defender frame. (I know, I know, I should’ve bought the LW Commander!!)

I called Smith & Alexander in Texas and got Allen Smith. I explained the above ‘cute’ story and WOW! Talking to Allen is like taking a pistolsmith class! He said my problem was more a MSH issue than a short grip. He ask me if my shots were mostly low and to the weak side? ...."Yep."

He told me that when the Army came back to Browning for changes to the M1911 one of the complaints was the Calvary, shooting mostly from horseback, were always hitting under their targets and wanted something done with the sights. JMB being the true genius that he was knew the sights were fine and came up with the arched MSH to force the shooter’s hand up higher on the grip. This simple change moves the muzzle higher in a natural point shooting stance and increased accuracy. The arched housing is one of the few changes made to the design and the result was the M1911A1 introduced in 1924. (Thank God they didn’t change the name to 1924!)

The reason we see few arched MSH's on today’s production 1911’s is due to the small horseback shooting demographic.

I share this experience with you (and others) to show how an unknown problem was fixed by observant and helpful fellow gun owner.
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Old 02-28-2012, 07:15 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canebrake

It's a new gun, shoot it, get to know the gun before you make any changes.

[*]NO new springs, it's a new gun.[*]If you lower the the front sight your dad will shoot high. (see below*)[*]The only change you need should be your experience with this new gun. Get your dad to teach you to shoot. He seems to be doing something right!


You want some real help? Get a friend to video you shooting and post it up. We'll tell you what you're doing wrong!

* About as good a summary as I've ever heard from my friend gorknoids;
The sights on your pistol are probably within a gnat's ass of being perfect. If they are not perfect, at least they are consistent. The other half of the shooting machine (The nut holding the weapon ) will never be perfect or consistent. Like fingerprints, every trigger-squeeze is unique. All of us ( Okay, all but 2 who will deny it) let go a "flyer" every now and then. Some of us (Me) do it more than most, and it's impossible to pinpoint just which one of the variables caused the shot to go wandering. I'm talking about missing the target entirely at 15 yards when you're accustomed to putting half inside the 7 ring or better. I don't count anything inside the 8 because I know it was just luck, because I'm not that good.
The idea is to recognize that you have 2 things working for you (A well-made gun and a stationary target) and about a gazillion things working against you (Distractions, all of your muscles, your eyesight, ADD, whatever) and to work on minimizing the things which work against you. The thing I have found to be the most helpful is rhythmic breathing. It gives me timing, keeps things fluid, and keeps me from fixating on muzzle wobble. See it, shoot it, inhale; see it, shoot it, inhale. Firearm design and ballistics are studies in mathematics, but shooting is Zen. You have to put the human into it, but you can't force the issue. The big thing is to practice a lot so that you're not caught up with the mechanics of the act and more focused on simply recognizing when the shot is going to go where you ask it to.

Under the 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!' column, Let me share this little MSH "fix" I didn't know I needed.

When I first got my Defender I couldn't hit paper with it! The gun had FTF and FTE issues and my cognitive dissonance was screaming what a dumb purchase!!!

My third trip to the range was my turning point. It was a slow day and the Range Officer was hanging around me escaping from the boredom. After watching my frustration he offered this question, "First mouse gun?" My hubris wanted to tell him to go clean up brass but my intellect said help. I said, “Yep.”

He said, “You can’t grip that mini-me like a Government model. Your grip is too low.

He went on to show me how to grip the Defender by jamming my thumb-web into the beavertail first and then let my fingers find their natural placement. He went on to tell me my grip looked good but he bet me he could make it better.

I figured at this point any assistance will help and said, “How?” He explained that he bet my strong side hand was doing all the gripping and that would pull the muzzle off target when the trigger is pulled. Have your weak side hand provide about 60% of the grip pressure.

I ran the remainder of my ammo on target, NO FTF/FTEs, me in amazement and the Range Officer with a big grin on his face!

What’s that cute story have to do with a MSH? OK…OK I’m getting to it!

My hands were obviously too big for this 3” 1911. In search for a fix I thought the addition of a magwell would add to the length of the Defender frame. (I know, I know, I should’ve bought the LW Commander!!)

I called Smith & Alexander in Texas and got Allen Smith. I explained the above ‘cute’ story and WOW! Talking to Allen is like taking a pistolsmith class! He said my problem was more a MSH issue than a short grip. He ask me if my shots were mostly low and to the weak side? ...."Yep."

He told me that when the Army came back to Browning for changes to the M1911 one of the complaints was the Calvary, shooting mostly from horseback, were always hitting under their targets and wanted something done with the sights. JMB being the true genius that he was knew the sights were fine and came up with the arched MSH to force the shooter’s hand up higher on the grip. This simple change moves the muzzle higher in a natural point shooting stance and increased accuracy. The arched housing is one of the few changes made to the design and the result was the M1911A1 introduced in 1924. (Thank God they didn’t change the name to 1924!)

The reason we see few arched MSH's on today’s production 1911’s is due to the small horseback shooting demographic.

I share this experience with you (and others) to show how an unknown problem was fixed by observant and helpful fellow gun owner.
So you think most of it is in my grip? I could see that. Sometimes I shoot great and other times im shooting low and to my weak side.

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Old 02-28-2012, 10:39 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jhamblen View Post
So you think most of it is in my grip? I could see that. Sometimes I shoot great and other times im shooting low and to my weak side.
Yes I do. Keep practicing.

Shooting low - 1911 Forum
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Get her dirty, then clean her so she starts to respect you. When her trust is complete, she will serve you well for a lifetime!

"...if doves shot back, there wouldn't be a need for a bag limit."
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Old 02-28-2012, 11:24 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canebrake

Yes I do. Keep practicing.
Thank you

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