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-   -   Heavy trigger (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f57/heavy-trigger-97728/)

starving030 09-27-2013 06:22 PM

Heavy trigger
 
I'm sure this has been covered here somewhere before but I couldn't seem to find it. If there is a thread please link it.

So I am a first time 1911 owner now. I traded for a Taurus PT1911pbl. Beautiful gun btw. Never really new the difference between blued and polished blued. Anyways, I love it thus far but I am afraid I have been spoiled by my other guns when it comes to the trigger. Especially my 357 and it's ultra light trigger. Is there a way to have a 1911 trigger very short and light? A hair trigger, kinda.

My 1911 has the adjustable trigger but seems like there is still a good distance from when it feels like it engages the spring to finally firing.

Or is a 1911 by design a strong clunky trigger?

danf_fl 09-27-2013 07:33 PM

First, don't try to adjust the trigger pull with the screw in the trigger. It is designed to adjust the overtravel only.
Adjusting the overtravel incorrectly will affect the firing pin movement and could render your handgun inop with the "Series-80" setup in a Taurus.

Trying to get a "hair trigger" on a 1911 is best left to someone who has experience with the 1911. It can be done, but it is not recommended as a kitchen workshop project.

The minimum I like on my 1911s is about 4# with minimal overtravel required for all parts to work correctly.

There is a reason a gunsmith will charge about $200.

Overkill0084 09-27-2013 07:33 PM

Typically 1911s have pretty good triggers. But some are heavier than others. My Springfield had a decent, but heavier than necessary trigger, IMHO. The common joke is that the Springfield legal dept. sets up the triggers. Initially I didn't really realize how heavy it was until I got my Dan Wesson CCO. A far nicer trigger right out of the box. So your situation isn't terribly rare. My solution was to ask around other shooters until I was referred to a good gunsmith who knew how to do 1911 triggers. 1911 trigger work isn't terribly complex (e.g. shouldn't be too expensive) but it does require the right gear and a trained touch.

starving030 09-27-2013 08:26 PM

Oh I'm not even going to try to do anything other that the screw on the trigger. I am no gunsmith and won't pretend to be.lol Also, I apologize that I'm not good with the terminology of overtravel and other terms. I just know that there is a little slack at first that feels like nothing is being engaged, then it tightens up, then a lil more and bang. The screw took care of the slack part. I am wondering about the the distance between the slack and the bang. I am just guessing but is that when the trigger actually pushes through the spring? And is there a way to shorten that distance?

Also, from your guys experience, is the trigger supposed to have some up and down movement?

danf_fl 09-27-2013 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by starving030 (Post 1385736)
The screw took care of the slack part. I am wondering about the the distance between the slack and the bang. I am just guessing but is that when the trigger actually pushes through the spring? And is there a way to shorten that distance?

Also, from your guys experience, is the trigger supposed to have some up and down movement?

The screw is for overtravel. Without overtravel (the trigger movement after releasing the sear), the firing pin block in the slide will get nicked and stop moving up or down and will not let the firing pin hit the primer.

Some take up (free movement) is required for the trigger to allow reset. Some experts use that portion to "stack" the trigger.

How much movement up and down?

starving030 09-27-2013 09:04 PM

Quote:

The screw is for overtravel. Without overtravel (the trigger movement after releasing the sear), the firing pin block in the slide will get nicked and stop moving up or down and will not let the firing pin hit the primer.

Some take up (free movement) is required for the trigger to allow reset. Some experts use that portion to "stack" the trigger.
Yeah. looks like I'm gonna have to do some research to learn the basics. I didn't understand much of that.lol

Quote:

How much movement up and down?
It moves about 1/32 or so. The problem is it causes an inconsistent pull on the trigger. It's like using a different trigger every time because it sits where it wants to. Difficult to explain.

danf_fl 09-27-2013 09:13 PM

It's not mine, but I would contact Taurus.

Explain how it causes an inconsistent trigger pull and let them handle it through warranty.

bntyhntr6975 09-27-2013 09:28 PM

A buddy recently picked up a Taurus 1911, not sure same as yours or not. It has a surprisingly nice trigger. Not what we're used to on our series 70 designs, but still nice.

I agree with contacting them and seeing what they will do about it.

magnumman 09-27-2013 10:08 PM

Congrats on the new gun. Taurus makes a nice 1911. I had one a few years ago buy let it get away. I ended up getting my dad the aluminum alloy framed pt1911 for his birthday. His was a little stiff as well but got better with use. If I were you, I would shoot it quite a bit before you spend money on a trigger job. You might find that it is not completely necessary.

starving030 09-28-2013 12:50 AM

Quote:

It's not mine, but I would contact Taurus.
Thanks for the idea. Taurus has already emailed me the shipping label and to expect a 2-4 week turnaround. Shipping paid both ways. I never dealt with them directly before, they have some great customer service. They are even gonna replace the black thumb safety with a stainless one for free. I'm going for a polished blue with silver accents look.


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