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-   -   Bore Brush Glock 30SF (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f56/bore-brush-glock-30sf-5766/)

Dan64456 07-21-2008 10:52 PM

Bore Brush Glock 30SF
 
When cleaning the barrel of the gun, are you supposed to only slide the bore brush, and/or wet patches in the direction of bullet travel? After watching a tutorial cleaning video, the guy mentioned to always insert the brush starting at the chamber end, then out the muzzle, yet right after mentioning that, he slid it all the way thru, then pulled back again in the direction opposite to that of the bullet travel... Seemingly defeating the purpose of starting out at a certain end of the barrel? Can someone clear this up for me? It is a pain in the a$$ to run the bore brush thru, then unscrew it to pull the looped cleaning rod back thru without the brush and having to reattach the bore brush for a second run thru in only one direction... If this is not necessary, I'd like to know about it. Thanks all

G21.45 07-22-2008 12:20 AM

Doesn't matter! The rule is; 'All the way through, AND all the way back'. You can start at either the muzzle or chamber end; however, the breech is preferred in order to avoid muzzle wear.

What you shouldn't do is change the direction of the brush in mid stroke. Learn how to guide the rod with the tips of your fingers in order to avoid constantly rubbing the crown or sides of the chamber, too.

You'll, also, save time and effort if you learn to wrap the cotton patches around the brush for all, but, the toughest cleaning chores.






(By the way who were you watching, Robert Dunlap at AGS?)

Dan64456 07-22-2008 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G21.45 (Post 32843)
Doesn't matter! The rule is; 'All the way through, AND all the way back'. You can start at either the muzzle or chamber end; however, the breech is preferred in order to avoid muzzle wear.

What you shouldn't do is change the direction of the brush in mid stroke. Learn how to guide the rod with the tips of your fingers in order to avoid constantly rubbing the crown or sides of the chamber, too.

You'll, also, save time and effort if you learn to wrap the cotton patches around the brush for all, but, the toughest cleaning chores.

(By the way who were you watching, Robert Dunlap at AGS?)

---Thanks for the info... So the muzzle won't wear even tho the brush is still entering it on the backstroke? And the guide rod I use is made of plastic (It came with the gun) so I'm assuming the chamber rubbing probably isn't much of an issue?
And as far as Robert Dunlap... I don't think so. I watched a couple of videos on youtube. One guy had a series of like 3 videos, the other was from a TV show and had a mustache, light brown hair and an almost southern accent... That's all I can tell you. LOL.

G21.45 07-22-2008 04:40 PM

:) The nylon brush and plastic rod that came with your Glock is all that you'll, usually, ever need. If you shoot lead, then, you'll probably have to use a phosphor-bronze (or Tynex) brush. The Hoppe's brushes fit onto the Glock rod.

No, you're not going to hurt your muzzle on the backstroke. (Why would you?) If you must clean a firearm from the muzzle end, (Garand rifle or a revolver) then buy a conical shaped rod guide to stick in the muzzle end while your cleaning.

If you want to speed things up remember to wrap the patches around the brush while you're scrubbing - This works for all but the most stubborn lead or jacket fouling; on that stuff you need to use the brush alone.

Pick up some of THIS and, make cleaning easy on yourself!

Dillinger 07-22-2008 04:52 PM

+1 on what you have been getting from info from G21 - A lot of what you hear about not starting at the business end of the barrel is that the crown can be damaged if you don't know what the hell you are doing.

For bolt action rifles, there is a blank that you put in the chamber that guides the rod right into the threads, then you can stroke back and forth the length of the barrel with having to worry about damage to either the chamber or the crown/muzzle.

Keep in mind that the lands and grooves can be damaged by excessive brushing, or using a lapping compound to a ridiculious extent, or using a steel brush, but for the most part, a good gentle scrubbing, some patch work and you shouldn't have anything to worry about. :D

Or you can get yourself an UltraSonic cleaning tank and drop the parts in, walk away and come back to a clean gun - which is what I prefer... LOL

JD


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