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Old 12-18-2011, 03:09 AM   #31
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GWK4667, I think you have very valid points. I was taught that after shooting to wash face and hands and blow my nose.

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Old 12-18-2011, 01:13 PM   #32
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Why i have an issue with state or fed law trying to govern parental duties!!

A 12 y/o handling a .357 mag.
Right , wrong or indifferent. The kid knows how to handle a firearm safely!

I realize there are MANY out there that DO NOT take their JOB as PARENT as seriously as some.
i agree with you. i dont like it, but its the law here. i think the onus should be on the parent(s) not the govt dictating what to do with a kid.
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:44 PM   #33
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Both indoor and outdoor have a risk - - - of course the outdoor range will have mother nature to blow and rain to wash but any good indoor range will have a ventilation system that will bring as much lead away from the shooting line ( and shooters ) as possible. The new requirements call for 50 CU FT per minute air flow ( 75 CU FT prefered ) for every SQ FT of area at the shooting line to be moving from behind the shooter to the target area. But when studies were done even with this flow lead styphnate and lead peroxide are found on any surface ( tables, floors, top of drink cans, clothing, shoes)

Before you take that drink go to a restroom and wash your hands and face ( and lips ) ASAP after leaving the line. The old wives tail was to wash in cold water to keep your pores closed - - - new research proves you need to wash in warm to midly hot water ( minimum of 15 seconds just like your kindergarden teacher said ) so that the pores can open and be flushed.

So what I'm trying to say is if a child is to young to keep thier hands away from their face they have no business at a shooting range!

This is an unseen danger and every adult has a duty to keep our children safe. I'm not trying to scare, I'm trying to give you the tools to keep safe.
In the matter of safety, some scare tactics are appropriate.

Dont we blow up mellons and water jugs (or actual holes in game animals) to show those just starting out what the business end of a gun does?

Anywho, i dont see this as "Scarey", i see it as needed information. Information that we dont always consider. Information we (I) should think about a little more.

Thanks for the heads up!
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Old 12-18-2011, 03:45 PM   #34
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i agree with you. i dont like it, but its the law here. i think the onus should be on the parent(s) not the govt dictating what to do with a kid.

Just another example of "The state" making laws to protect us from ourselves.

Nanny stating!
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Old 12-27-2011, 02:58 PM   #35
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Wow! After reading this thread, I went and did some snooping around the Internet. Found the following site.

Lead Contaminates Handout

One quote from the article: "The author of this article is a firearms instructor and an avid shooter, and was aware of the potential of lead poisoning with indoor range use, but like most, he hadn't worried much about it. However, encountering this report caused him to have his blood lead level tested. It turned out that he had serious lead poisoning which explained the reason for a host of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms that had been developing for months, but which his physician had been unable to diagnose. It also motivated the author to do some serious research into lead poisoning, and to write this article."

The report he mentioned is described also: "In the August 19, 1989 issue of the weekly magazine, Science News, there appeared an article summarizing a research project on lead poisoning that was first reported in the American Journal of Public Health."

I think I may stock up on some of the face masks that hospitals use to keep that junk off me. And I'm definitely going to be hitting the men's room right after shooting from now on. Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks?

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Old 12-27-2011, 04:54 PM   #36
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Balota, Thanks so much for finding this - - - I have the NRA info and it is down to about 19 pages but I feel the five paragraphs I just copied tell much of the story.

ROUTES OF EXPOSURE

Lead poisoning can come from a number of sources. The more common ones are, lead in paint, in the glaze on dishes, in old lead lined water pipes, water tanks, and water coolers, in plumbing lead-solder joints, in dust contaminated from years of burning leaded gasoline, in industrial settings, in moonshine whiskey distilled in lead soldered auto radiators, and from the shooting range or the handling of ammunition. The last two are obviously the concern of this article, but it is important to remember that if you are exposed to lead from several sources it can add up quickly.

Lead can enter the body by breathing it in as a dust or vapor, by ingesting it, and to a lesser extend, by absorption through the skin. On the shooting range it tends to enter via all three routes. Every time you discharge a handgun a spray of lead erupts into the air around you. If you are shooting cast lead bullets, part of this lead is in the form of microscopic particles sheared from the bullet as it passes down the barrel. Down range, the bullet impacting on the armor plate emits a spray of fine lead particles. More importantly, the chemical commonly used in primers is lead styphnate, and detonating the primer discharges a cloud of molecular lead compounds. So the air on a shooting range -- even an extremely well ventilated range -- tends to contain a lot of lead, both as dust, and as gas. It settles in large amounts on the floor, and on other horizontal surfaces as well. Even if the range passes OSHA standards for airborne lead contamination (which many don't), you will still often find yourself standing in a cloud of lead filled gun smoke as the air currents eddy around you. All the while you are breathing in lead, about 30-50% of which will dissolve from your lungs into your bloodstream. If you have any doubts about this, just blow your nose when you leave the range after a lengthy shooting session. That black stuff in the mucous is the residue of gun smoke, and it contains a lot of lead.

The powder residue you get all over your hands also contains a lot of lead. Left on your hands, some of this can actually be absorbed directly through your skin. More importantly, if you eat with this residue still on your hands, you will contaminate your food with a significant amount of lead. You can also contaminate your food with residue from around your mouth, particularly if you have a mustache. Your breathing concentrates lead around your nose and upper lip, and a mustache will act as a filter to trap the particles and gases. Your sandwich or pizza will then carry those particles into your mouth. This is particularly important to realize, because although only about 10% of ingested elemental lead is absorbed, nearly 100% of ingested lead salts -- formed when you ignite the primer -- are absorbed. So ingestion is a very efficient way to absorb certain forms of lead.

Handling fired brass can result in the same problem. The powder residue on fired brass also contains a lot of chemical and particulate lead. The author knows of one individual who didn't spend much time on the range, but who regularly sorted brass while munching snacks, and gave himself serious lead poisoning in the process.

If you have small children, it is also important to realize that you can carry lead residue home and contaminate your living quarters and car. You will get the dust on your shoes, on your clothes, on your shooting gear, and in your hair. It will then be tracked into and settle on the floor of your home. Children, of course, live on the floor and put everything into their mouths. And as we noted before, they are extremely susceptible to lead poisoning. In the course of the research for this article, the author was told by a local health official of a case where the children of one particular family were found to have elevated blood levels of lead, and the family car was so badly contaminated (from the family's clothing) that it simply had to be gotten rid of.

I find I have a harder time teaching about the safety issues of lead than training safe handling procedures!

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