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-   -   Training that "counts" (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/training-counts-48000/)

BigByrd47119 09-09-2011 05:35 AM

Training that "counts"
 
Hello again everyone.

I recently added a Diamondback DB380 to my firearms collection.The DB does not have a last round hold-open. This lead to me wonder...

Do you keep a mental count of how many rounds you have left if your firearm while at the range? Its OK, according to the manufacturer, to dry-fire this gun, but in a training environment it seems to me that knowing how many rounds you have left in the gun is important. If we will preform as we train, it makes logical sense. I had never considered the possible merits of round counting before this as I would just wait for a slide to lock back. However, now I can see where this could be valuable.

So, do you round count? No? Do you have a reason for either or?

I know I will be.

Thanks in advance.

danf_fl 09-09-2011 08:22 AM

I don't "round count" most of the time. I use the empty weapon to see if I have developed a flinch when practicing (by trying to squeeze one more round) and to practice mag changes. I vary how many rounds I have loaded in each mag and lay them out, grabbing any mag at random.

NOVA 09-09-2011 11:27 AM

I voted no, but really there should be another option in your poll: "SOMETIMES"

I can imagine a situation , say in Home Defense, where you would not want to empty your mag until you know the threat is gone or unless you have an extra mag. I have no formal training in that scenario, so hopefully others will post their opinion on it and we'll all get educated.

On the other hand, counting rounds implies thast the shooter expects to have an empty gun. I can tell you from personal experience that assuming the gun is empty is a mistake you NEVER want to make. This is why the safest practice is to always assume every gun you touch is LOADED.

BigByrd47119 09-09-2011 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NOVA (Post 577266)
I voted no, but really there should be another option in your poll: "SOMETIMES"

I can imagine a situation , say in Home Defense, where you would not want to empty your mag until you know the threat is gone or unless you have an extra mag. I have no formal training in that scenario, so hopefully others will post their opinion on it and we'll all get educated.

On the other hand, counting rounds implies thast the shooter expects to have an empty gun. I can tell you from personal experience that assuming the gun is empty is a mistake you NEVER want to make. This is why the safest practice is to always assume every gun you touch is LOADED.

I'm looking at this from a purely tactical standpoint. Take for example the I-Hop shooting. What if there was 2+ gunmen and you couldn't get out without seriously compromising yourself. Assuming that a shootout occurs with breaks in the action. Because I'm carrying a .380 I have 2 extra mags with me. With one in the tube and two in the mag, its time for a reload if there is a break in the action. If I never train to keep count at the range, I would never remember to do it in a real world scenario. That's what I'm getting at I suppose.

How many others practice this?

Vincine 09-09-2011 01:00 PM

God forbid you’re involved in a shooting incident, I would think you’d want to know where all your bullets are all the time, before and after they’re fired. If you’re low on rounds, and you have an opportunity to load a full magazine, why would you take the chance and wait till you were empty hoping you’ll get another chance then?

BigByrd47119 09-09-2011 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vincine (Post 577282)
God forbid you’re involved in a shooting incident, I would think you’d want to know where all your bullets are all the time, before and after they’re fired. If you’re low on rounds, and you have an opportunity to load a full magazine, why would you take the chance and wait till you were empty hoping you’ll get another chance then?

That's the purpose of this thread. Do you practice counting rounds so that in a shtf situation you would naturally know how many rounds you had (and know if you should reload)? If you don't practice it, I don't think you would do it in a real life or death situation.

Toll13 09-09-2011 01:18 PM

I know what you're thinking. "Did he fire six shots or only five?" Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement I kind of lost track myself. But being as this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself one question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?

silverado113 09-09-2011 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NOVA (Post 577266)
I voted no, but really there should be another option in your poll: "SOMETIMES"

I can imagine a situation , say in Home Defense, where you would not want to empty your mag until you know the threat is gone or unless you have an extra mag. I have no formal training in that scenario, so hopefully others will post their opinion on it and we'll all get educated.

On the other hand, counting rounds implies thast the shooter expects to have an empty gun. I can tell you from personal experience that assuming the gun is empty is a mistake you NEVER want to make. This is why the safest practice is to always assume every gun you touch is LOADED.


I agree on the sometimes option but I voted yes because I do round count sometimes. However the way I look at it, is in a shootout I would be worried about putting rounds down range and on target. As a Marine I can't count that high anyways....lol no but really if you haven't been in a firefight believe it or not it is kind of like slow motion and muscle memory takes over more than anything so practice, practice, practice and when you think you are good practice some more!

therewolf 09-09-2011 04:00 PM

I count. Carefully.

The reason is my favorites, the rimfire 22s, can be damaged if you

dry fire them.

It doen't hurt to get in the habit with all the guns, then counting for the .22s

is a habitual, reflexive, muscle memory action, like checking to see if a

gun is loaded every time...

silverado113 09-09-2011 04:08 PM

Treat Never Keep Keep = Treat every weapon as if it was loaded, Never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot, Keep your finger straight and off the trigger until you intend to fire, Keep the weapon on safe until you are ready to fire. 4 safety rules. Rule for Gunfighting = Be polite. Be professional. Be Courteous, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet.


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