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-   -   Taking a Stance (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/taking-stance-3347/)

DCJS Instructor 02-17-2008 01:14 PM

Taking a Stance
 
The Stance is the base for the shooting platform. Not only does a proper stance assist in controlling recoil, it also allows you to move and react quickly and to draw your weapon with minimal movement.

The proper stance consists of:

a. Shoulders square to the target.
b. Feet shoulder width apart.
c. Weight slightly forward on the balls of the feet.
d. Head remains high and still with chin pointing at the target.
e. Ears in front of shoulders, shoulders in front of hips.
f. Be Comfortable.

The shooting stance is basically a support or shooting platform. The quality of the stance is a major determining factor in creating conditions for maximum control and accuracy for shooting.

A high degree of control is necessary to deliver a rapid, accurate shot. Every individual is unique and possess characteristics that are their’s alone. These characteristics include height, weight, muscular and skeletal development, degree of flexibility and more. Therefore, there can be no universal shooting stance that can be utilized by all people.

Each shooter, under the guidance of the Firearms Instructor, and consistent with safety must find the shooting stance which is best suited to them and provides the greatest degree of stability and accuracy for shooting. The shooter must be able to assume their stance instinctively, as a reflex action with minimal effort or conscious manipulation of their body.

Remember: "Conflict is inevitable; Combat is an option".

Stay Safe & Shoot Straight!

Tom Perroni

matt g 02-17-2008 06:19 PM

I shoot from more of a martial arts stance, with my shoulders at a 45 to my target rather than a 90 but it seems to work well for me. Other than that, all of your other points prove true.

SimonTuffGuy 02-26-2008 01:03 AM

Nice points Tom. Our NRA instructors at the handgun class I took back in March put these same points in our heads. As Matt said, I feel more comfortable with a miss-matched foot and at more of a 45 degree angle. It just feels better on me.

I think that if I were put into a combat more in a split second, I would be more able to function in "my" stance, than trying to square up, etc.

RJ Stewart 02-26-2008 02:50 AM

I prefer a modified Weaver stance with a martial arts style planting of the feet. It enables me to move while firing, and I'm a harder target to hit than if I'm standing in an Isocolese stance, shoulders square to the target. I think in a shooting situation where you may have to move the shoulders square to the target is not practical.

matt g 02-26-2008 02:37 PM

I started doing it, because I shot long guns for close to 20 years before I picked up my first pistol. It was easy for me to make the transition, by not changing my stance much. I was able to track and lead targets from the long gun position, so I stuck with it rather than attempting to learn something new.

robocop10mm 02-26-2008 07:42 PM

Ah, the Weaver vs Isocoles argument. I shoot Weaver but am trying to retrain myself to Isocoles (Squared to target) for a variety of reasons.
1. Body armor- squaring to the target allows the body armor to rpotect my vital areas. Weaver leaves my arm pit vulnerable.
2. Recoil management- MUCH faster back on target for follow up shots when squared to the target.
3. Multiple target aquisition- better able to pivot to the left (I'm right handed) from the Isocoles.

HK SMG school taught me that I can dump an entire mag, full auto into a silver dollar sized hole at 10 yards by squaring to the target and flexing my abs to pull my shoulders forward. Thompson SMG- 5 shot bursts into a pie plate at 75 yards. M-16- 5 shot bursts into pie plate at 125 yards.

jeepcreep927 03-06-2008 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robocop10mm (Post 17501)
Ah, the Weaver vs Isocoles argument. I shoot Weaver but am trying to retrain myself to Isocoles (Squared to target) for a variety of reasons.
1. Body armor- squaring to the target allows the body armor to rpotect my vital areas. Weaver leaves my arm pit vulnerable.
2. Recoil management- MUCH faster back on target for follow up shots when squared to the target.
3. Multiple target aquisition- better able to pivot to the left (I'm right handed) from the Isocoles.

HK SMG school taught me that I can dump an entire mag, full auto into a silver dollar sized hole at 10 yards by squaring to the target and flexing my abs to pull my shoulders forward. Thompson SMG- 5 shot bursts into a pie plate at 75 yards. M-16- 5 shot bursts into pie plate at 125 yards.

Perfectly stated on all points. Mobility is greatly increased with an isosceles stance. It's a more solid foundation to begin with, allows a much increased ability to traverse targets, and allows proper body position to move. Try a weaver or modified weaver and see how far you can rotate JUST your upper body. Then do the same with an isosceles and comapare how far you can rotate. It also allows you to move in any direction, properly, without crossing your feet and allows oblique movement. I don't know of any legitimate schools of instruction that teach anything else anymore for handgun, shotgun, subgun or carbine use.

Samhain 03-06-2008 01:48 PM

I agree with the rest of you. My stance is not square either.
I also shoot better with my elbows bent a little and my face closer to the gun, rather then arms fully extended.

ranger_sxt 03-06-2008 08:13 PM

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...ight/rule4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...ight/Rule7.jpg

jeepcreep927 03-07-2008 02:35 AM

The posters are great. If you want to minimize proper tecnique to that degree go ahead. Sure, you may get by having a jacked up stance and crossing your feet while running up the down side of an escalator while drawing you Desert Eagle .50 AE from your homemade ankle holster, but how many times? If you think "training" means you do what you can to get by,once, than have at it. It may work out for you, it may not. I doubt there's many professionals out there, military or L/E, who say "yeah, I just use what the hell ever stance I happen to slump into, I'll get by, and ten years from now no one will remember anyway." No one except your wife and kids cause your dead cause you tripped over something because you had your head up your ass with your foot positioning and you got smoked cause instead of getting to your weapon to protect yourself, you're fumble ****ing around on the floor. But, some dude put up some posters on a gun forum and apparently Wyatt Earp said do whatever you want, no one will remember. Have at it boys. Shoot from a friggin lawn chair with your feet up on the beer cooler for all I care.


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