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Some things you might not have thought about


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Old 02-09-2011, 09:41 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirrel_Slayer View Post
Darin, what types of things do you take into consideration when deciding what type of weapon and caliber to use solely for home protection, ie. the dedicated night stand gun.
HD my biggest concern is alway over penetration vs stoppability. Depending where you live I would alway consider where that round is going and choose something that disperses energy quickly. My experience points to a slower velocity heavier round. Something like a .45.

My go to when at all possible is a shotgun with #4 buck. It is the best compromise between power and penetration. If I could get my hands on it, I would love to get PolyShok. It's a newer "all around" round for shotgun that was only available to LE. The reports I read when my department went to it was it stops with whatever it strikes first including sheet rock or a BG.

As far as a HG, I have always trusted the .40 because I carried it a lot and am fairly used to it. But it contradicts my premise of a lower velocity heavier round. However, I recently bought a .45 I am researching that round quit a bit. Some people really like revolvers and for that I would definitely go with a .38 special and then maybe .357 a couple of tubes down.

Just like with everything else practice, pratice, pratice.

The single most important piece of advice I can give anyone is remember to slow things down. To me that is the difference between someone who is in control and someone who is making rash decisions. If you slow everything down, fight or flight subsides, panic goes away and tunnel vision resolves.

Thanks
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"A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks."
Thomas Jefferson
From the great speaker...er uh Barak Obongo

"Liberals make great proctologists. They're the only ones who truly know what the inside of an anus looks like."~me

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Old 02-09-2011, 09:49 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by robocop10mm View Post
Well, if you are buried in snow and the street is down to one lane, I suppose the street address placard and or mail box is still in plain view and perfectly readable from a police car in the street.

Driving in extreme snow conditions is like flying with NVG's over the desert. You can easily lose your bearings.
100% true. LE knows their streets and hundred blocks, but when your house is isolated due to weather or location, you have to understand we don't have a built in GPS.

This is a great opportunity for you to learn from. What if you needed the police or medics ASAP, what could you do to improve your chances of being located?

1. Turn on all exterior lights.
2. If possible stand outside to get their attention. But don't worry if you see them sitting at the end of the street. They might be waiting to pony up and get a plan ready.
3. If you have a light near the street, consider having a pulsator put on it that will flash the light.
4. If your car is accessible, turn on the hazard lights.
5. Have an address marker that is reflective and is higher than any possible obstructions.

Whatever you do that is out of the ordinary, tell dispatch ..."My house has the flashing lights" or "the car with the hazard lights on."

Also, as much as LE is there to serve and protect, remember a lot of the time we are a janitorial service that takes reports. Always be prepared to handle situations yourself with a level head. Practice scenarios in your head, so that way if something happens you are mentally prepared.

Hope this helps you out,
Darin.
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Quote:
"A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks."
Thomas Jefferson
From the great speaker...er uh Barak Obongo

"Liberals make great proctologists. They're the only ones who truly know what the inside of an anus looks like."~me

Last edited by DarinCraft; 02-09-2011 at 09:55 PM.
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Old 02-09-2011, 09:52 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarinCraft View Post
HD my biggest concern is alway over penetration vs stoppability. Depending where you live I would alway consider where that round is going and choose something that disperses energy quickly. My experience points to a slower velocity heavier round. Something like a .45.

My go to when at all possible is a shotgun with #4 buck. It is the best compromise between power and penetration. If I could get my hands on it, I would love to get PolyShok. It's a newer "all around" round for shotgun that was only available to LE. The reports I read when my department went to it was it stops with whatever it strikes first including sheet rock or a BG.

As far as a HG, I have always trusted the .40 because I carried it a lot and am fairly used to it. But it contradicts my premise of a lower velocity heavier round. However, I recently bought a .45 I am researching that round quit a bit. Some people really like revolvers and for that I would definitely go with a .38 special and then maybe .357 a couple of tubes down.

Just like with everything else practice, pratice, pratice.

Thanks
Good stuff. I have both a .45 and a .38, and have sent plenty of lead down the tubes of both. A 12 guage pump shot gun is in the near future, so I will remember the #4 Buckshot suggestion. Thank you for the info.
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Old 02-09-2011, 10:55 PM   #24
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This is good information. I'm thinking of getting that bedside holster holder that Crossbreed sells, that slides between the mattress and box springs. When I'm in bed, I can drop my arm down right to where the gun (most likely the Para P-10 .45) would be.
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Old 02-09-2011, 11:08 PM   #25
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really well put i never put that much consideration into it besides lock and load
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Old 02-10-2011, 05:41 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckhuntr View Post
This is good information. I'm thinking of getting that bedside holster holder that Crossbreed sells, that slides between the mattress and box springs. When I'm in bed, I can drop my arm down right to where the gun (most likely the Para P-10 .45) would be.
Quote:
Originally Posted by remi514 View Post
really well put i never put that much consideration into it besides lock and load
I'm glad I could help
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Quote:
"A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks."
Thomas Jefferson
From the great speaker...er uh Barak Obongo

"Liberals make great proctologists. They're the only ones who truly know what the inside of an anus looks like."~me
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Old 02-11-2011, 04:34 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robocop10mm View Post
Well, if you are buried in snow and the street is down to one lane, I suppose the street address placard and or mail box is still in plain view and perfectly readable from a police car in the street.

Driving in extreme snow conditions is like flying with NVG's over the desert. You can easily lose your bearings.
Noob mistake on my part. The conditions were good visibility the day I was blocked in. It was after the storms.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DarinCraft View Post
100%
This is a great opportunity for you to learn from. What if you needed the police or medics ASAP, what could you do to improve your chances of being located?

1. Turn on all exterior lights.
2. If possible stand outside to get their attention. But don't worry if you see them sitting at the end of the street. They might be waiting to pony up and get a plan ready.
3. If you have a light near the street, consider having a pulsator put on it that will flash the light.
4. If your car is accessible, turn on the hazard lights.
5. Have an address marker that is reflective and is higher than any possible obstructions.
Darin.
Awesome feedback, I wouldn't have thought to do most of that. Whenever I expect someone I have exterior light on. I really like the idea of turning the hazards on.
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Old 02-14-2011, 06:11 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by NickW View Post
Noob mistake on my part. The conditions were good visibility the day I was blocked in. It was after the storms.




Awesome feedback, I wouldn't have thought to do most of that. Whenever I expect someone I have exterior light on. I really like the idea of turning the hazards on.
Glad to help. Goal is to learn from things. I wouldn't call it a mistake, you just didn't know.
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Quote:
"A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks."
Thomas Jefferson
From the great speaker...er uh Barak Obongo

"Liberals make great proctologists. They're the only ones who truly know what the inside of an anus looks like."~me
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Old 02-14-2011, 07:41 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by Car54:

Another thing you can do that doesn't involve shooting is to constantly be aware of your surroundings and those who surround you. Watch people and their actions. The hands and eyes are the most important areas to watch. Most often furtive eye movement and hand gestures will coincide with each other just prior to or at the onset of any action.

Be alert and look for areas of safety that offer cover or concealment for you and your family if an incident breaks out. Always think of getting to safety before engaging the threat unless your life depends on immediate action. It might be as simple as moving into a store from the court area in a mall. If possible continue to watch the incident as you move to safety while notifying the authorities, but don't jeopardize anyones safety in order to give a blow by blow account.

Another thing, police departments have stressed a danger zone called the "reactionary gap". This is an area within 21 feet of you where a person can get to you within 1.5 seconds and do you harm. If trouble presents itself to you always make sure you try to keep at least that distance. A person armed with a knife who is not very proficient with it can still get to you and do you harm before you react if within the 21 foot gap.
This was posted on another thread by Car54 who is a retired Officer. This is great information when outside of your house. This could make you a great witness and maybe someones savior.

If you practice a person's description, then move onto multiple persons, then onto what they were doing, and when you get good quiz yourself. What was the guy sitting in the corner of the restaurant wearing? What was he doing?With this you can accomplish numerous things:
1) you WILL be more aware of your surroundings.
2) IF something happens, you WILL be a great witness for LE
3) You WILL start to recognize behavior and will be able to react more effectively. Whether that be getting your family and getting the hell out or dealing with the threat more forwardly.

This is great info Car54
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Old 02-17-2011, 01:36 PM   #30
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An alarm system with motion detectors can be a great help in determining if someone is in the house and where they are. If you have a control panel in the bedroom, which you should, the motion detectors will pick any movement and it will be indicated on the control panel zone indicators. You can track the intruder as he/they move through the house....assuming they are still in the house with the alarm going off. Motion detectors can be programed to not detect pets, unless the pet is a 80 lb. German Shepherd, in which case you won't need the alarm system turned on because you have a security guard.

Lennie
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