Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   Training & Safety (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/)
-   -   Recoil (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/recoil-17832/)

Ermac 09-08-2009 08:20 PM

Recoil
 
When I'm shooting a rifle from rest alot of times my shoulder get the crap kicked out of it but when I'm standing up I'm fine. What gives?

skullcrusher 09-08-2009 08:39 PM

It is easier to draw the rifle to your shoulder tightly when standing than to press your shoulder into the rifle from a rest. Also, when standing, it is a natural motion to absorb the kick with your full body. Your shoulder gets all of the force when shooting from a rest.

Ever notice that when you are sighting in a rifle, you feel every bit of the recoil. But when shooting at game, you don't even notice the kick?

Ermac 09-08-2009 08:49 PM

That explains alot thanks.

Moss99 09-08-2009 08:54 PM

Basically what Skull said...

I've found that when shooting from a standing, kneeling or sitting position, the body is free to move with the recoil of the gun but in the prone position or when shooting from a bench, the body does not freely move and therefore absorbs much more of the recoil, giving the effect of a harder kick to the shooter.

aliendroid 09-08-2009 11:49 PM

I guess I'm a ***** but when I fire my 30.06 20 times my shoulder and chest hurts. lol.

Dillinger 09-08-2009 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aliendroid (Post 157080)
I guess I'm a ***** but when I fire my 30.06 20 times my shoulder and chest hurts. lol.

A couple of thoughts for you.

Pachmyer Decelerator Recoil Pad

Muzzle Break

That will tame your recoil to something much more managable...

JD

cpttango30 09-09-2009 12:16 AM

It is all ergonomics. You are in a very different position when you shoot on the bench.

I think that is some reason why bench guns are so heavy. It is not for accuracy it is to help reduce felt recoil....

skullcrusher 09-09-2009 01:02 AM

There is a perfect union to be found when bench shooting. It is different for everone. You gotta get behind the rifle with your mass and shoulders. If you are sitting too high, you will get a scope bite. If you have never been bitten by the scope, you have not shot enough. Agian my opinion. (amo)

Dillinger 09-09-2009 01:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skullcrusher (Post 157128)
If you have never been bitten by the scope, you have not shot enough. Agian my opinion. (amo)

:eek::confused:

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot over?!?!

Or maybe you were taught the right way to address the rifle in the first place, and you have your rifle fit to your correct length of pull. ;)

JD

skullcrusher 09-09-2009 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dillinger (Post 157131)
:eek::confused:

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot over?!?!

Or maybe you were taught the right way to address the rifle in the first place, and you have your rifle fit to your correct length of pull. ;)

JD

That's fine if your only shooting purposes are target and target.

Most shooters I know have engaged the scope and rifle and at one time or another only to have it bark their face. Sure, it is easy enough to address the rifle and position with caution when your target is a target that does not move or breathe air. It is cool when you can buy a rifle fitted and sighted with your length of pull as a guide for a custom deal. The angels sing everytime that is done and paid for.

So I throw back the Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:43 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.