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Robert NC 08-06-2009 11:07 AM

Pistol Training
 
Ok I have probably missed this somewhere on the site, but, I need a little help for target practice.

Know that the CCW course usually is 1, 3, 5, & 7 yards. That is no problem. Also remember that we used some barriers when we did training on the firing range in military. Just can't remember what distances. Been awhile and getting old. :confused:

I'm shooting S&W 9mm and 22 revolver. I know that I could pick any distance but would like some input from the experts.

Thanks for info in advance. :)

SGT-MILLER 08-06-2009 12:14 PM

Train at every distance up to and including 25 yards on a regular basis. Occasionally, you should also engage targets at ranges up to 50 yards (so your know where your sidearm shoots at that range).

I usually train at 7 yards, 10 yards, 15 yards, 20 yards, 25 yards, and I shoot out to 50 yards every once in awhile.

IGETEVEN 08-06-2009 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SGT-MILLER (Post 140280)
Train at every distance up to and including 25 yards on a regular basis. Occasionally, you should also engage targets at ranges up to 50 yards (so your know where your sidearm shoots at that range).

I usually train at 7 yards, 10 yards, 15 yards, 20 yards, 25 yards, and I shoot out to 50 yards every once in awhile.

++1 these are the best shooting training tactics. 50 yards is to verify your handgun is accurate at that distance and give you some confidence that you and your handgun, can still maintain a group at that distance as mentioned, a 50 yard physical threat shooting with a BG is possible, but highly improbable. Most encounters take place at 1-15 yards.

Jack

Rentacop 08-06-2009 04:39 PM

Robert-
Now that you have gotten the "advice from the experts " that you requested, I'd like add my opinion ( LOL).

Mickey Fowler and Mike Dalton said in their book, " Life Without Fear...", that you are ready to shoot in competition if you can keep all of your shots on an 8" paper plate at 50 yards. I don't know how big an 8" plate they used but mine are so small that I miss sometimes ! (LOL)

The conventional approach is to shoot at a 5.5" bull's eye at 25 yards because, at that distance, minor errors are easy to spot. Once you eliminate flinch, place your shots in a consistant pattern, build steadiness etc. , then you move to close-in combat-style shooting. That way, you first develop good shooting skills and then speed it up for combat.

Rob Pincus takes the opposite approach with his Combat Focus Shooting. He starts people off with close-distance Isoceles-stance shooting and he says his methods work.

IGETEVEN 08-06-2009 06:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rentacop (Post 140394)
Robert-
Now that you have gotten the "advice from the experts " that you requested, I'd like add my opinion ( LOL).

Mickey Fowler and Mike Dalton said in their book, " Life Without Fear...", that you are ready to shoot in competition if you can keep all of your shots on an 8" paper plate at 50 yards. I don't know how big an 8" plate they used but mine are so small that I miss sometimes ! (LOL)

The conventional approach is to shoot at a 5.5" bull's eye at 25 yards because, at that distance, minor errors are easy to spot. Once you eliminate flinch, place your shots in a consistant pattern, build steadiness etc. , then you move to close-in combat-style shooting. That way, you first develop good shooting skills and then speed it up for combat.

Rob Pincus takes the opposite approach with his Combat Focus Shooting. He starts people off with close-distance Isoceles-stance shooting and he says his methods work.

Damn good information there Rentacop and thanks for your input. Rob Pincus does have a very productive method in teaching his method of Combat Focus Shooting and I have used some of his methods. IMO, any and all exposures of different training shooting methods only enhances one's ability to shoot and perform that much better and consistently.

Jack

Robert NC 08-07-2009 02:27 AM

Thank you gentlemen. Every bit of information helps. Got my target holder built. Now for a moveable baricade and some time with a long tape measure. Then got to shooting and practicing.

katdadee 08-08-2009 02:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert NC (Post 140645)
Thank you gentlemen. Every bit of information helps. Got my target holder built. Now for a moveable baricade and some time with a long tape measure. Then got to shooting and practicing.

Hey Robert,
Where do you live at here in NC and do you have a lot of land or something? I wish I had some land that I could go practice on, here in the city the only shots I can practice in my yard are flop shots and chips and putts.

Amp

Rentacop 08-08-2009 05:43 PM

Regarding distances for training :
The old federal A-1 course qualification employed distances of 3, 7, 15, and 25 yards. The target was the old B-27 . All shooting except the weak hand shots was two-handed sighted shooting double-action with .38 Special revolver. Possible 300, 210 to pass. 60 rounds, with a possible 5 points for each shot. Anything 8-ring or better was 5 points. As I recall, the course of fire was something like this :
3 yards, draw and fire two shots in 3 seconds- Total 6 shots
7 yards, draw and fire 2 shots in 4 seconds. On last 2, fire two, load two, fire two in 15 seconds. 2 in 4 seconds two more times.
15 yards , draw and fire one shot in 5 seconds 6 times. On last shot, fire one, load 6, transfer to weak hand and fire one shot weak hand only. Stay aimed in. Fire one shot weak hand in 3 seconds 5 times.
25 yards- kneel draw and fire one shot in 8 seconds, 6 times. Stay aimed in.
Draw and fire 2 shots right barricade in 12 seconds. Stay aimed in and repeat ( 6 shots ). Repeat for left barricade.
This course of fire gave good marksmen enough time to shoot out the 10-ring, so it was not realistic as far as time goes. It did help illustrate the need to trade speed for accuracy at 25 yards, though. A later course for semi-autos was similar. The original A-1 has been modified for speed loaders, BTW. Nowadays, the A-1 target is the Transitional Target II .


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