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-   -   A little knowledge for all semi-auto (and revolver) owners. (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/little-knowledge-all-semi-auto-revolver-owners-96932/)

M605 09-12-2013 01:33 PM

A little knowledge for all semi-auto (and revolver) owners.
 
Does my gun have a clip or a magazine? I have seen so many people call a magazine a clip I thought I would create a thread about it. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia has a nice write on them, but my favorite is of course Hickok45 which made this nice little vidieo on the differences for them. Hope this helps the shooters out there that are not sure the difference between the two.


As I was playing around in Hickok45's youtube site I ran across this video as well, How NOT to shoot a semi-auto pistol. Something similar happened to a friend of mine back in 1979 when I bought my first semi-auto (a .25 Titan F.I.E. for $49.95 at the local department store) when we took it out the first time, but he only got a good cut from it. For the beginners this will save you some skin/pain and for the experienced it should be a little amusing to see what happened to the hotdog.


While I am at it here is a little ditty on the revolver by Hickok45


CrazedJava 09-12-2013 02:13 PM

Here's my ongoing issue with the whole "magazine vs. clip" debate.

Nobody cares. It's a level of semantic detail that is ONLY important to people of the gun. It's like talking to a Trekkie (who wants to be called a "Trekker") and have them explain the differences between the various types of ships named Enterprise. It's only important to them.

We can get as twitterpated as we want over it, but it's a semantic detail that wastes time. We don't need to condescendingly correct people, we need them to understand why having 30 rounds in a clip is not a bad thing.

M605 09-12-2013 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrazedJava (Post 1369674)
Here's my ongoing issue with the whole "magazine vs. clip" debate.

Nobody cares. It's a level of semantic detail that is ONLY important to people of the gun. It's like talking to a Trekkie (who wants to be called a "Trekker") and have them explain the differences between the various types of ships named Enterprise. It's only important to them.

We can get as twitterpated as we want over it, but it's a semantic detail that wastes time. We don't need to condescendingly correct people, we need them to understand why having 30 rounds in a clip is not a bad thing.

For the record I am not "condescendingly correcting people". I am sure some people will find it interesting, sorry you don't, but thank you for your rant. :o

lwspoon1 09-16-2013 01:55 PM

Thanks for the information

mountainman13 09-16-2013 02:07 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by CrazedJava (Post 1369674)
Here's my ongoing issue with the whole "magazine vs. clip" debate.

Nobody cares. It's a level of semantic detail that is ONLY important to people of the gun. It's like talking to a Trekkie (who wants to be called a "Trekker") and have them explain the differences between the various types of ships named Enterprise. It's only important to them.

We can get as twitterpated as we want over it, but it's a semantic detail that wastes time. We don't need to condescendingly correct people, we need them to understand why having 30 rounds in a clip is not a bad thing.

There appears to be more than a difference of semantics.

CrazedJava 09-16-2013 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mountainman13 (Post 1373641)
There appears to be more than a difference of semantics.

Sure, to us. I know the difference between a magazine and a clip. The problem is that arguing over semantics is a "forest for the trees" situation.

What is your priority? Showing off your superior gun knowledge or having a meaningful debate on why gun control doesn't work?

Believe it or not, you can't have it both ways.

I've worked in the technology field for many years now. I have tons of esoteric knowledge that simply does not translate well to people who are non-technical. In the process of explaining projects or negotiating contracts it is very tempting to start correcting non-technical people on their vernacular. While I always make sure requirements or specification use the correct language, I have found that in trying to convince someone to see things my way or to at least consider my point of view trying to correct them on terminology is a great way to set them against me.

I don't own a single firearm that uses a clip. When I talk to someone who uses that term in reference to modern firearms, I just do a sort of inner head shake and keep my eye on the ball. Getting mired in the details is going to gain me nothing.

Now if I can get someone to the range and is interested in shooting, THAT is the time to do some education.

therewolf 09-16-2013 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrazedJava (Post 1369674)
Here's my ongoing issue with the whole "magazine vs. clip" debate.

Nobody cares. It's a level of semantic detail that is ONLY important to people of the gun. It's like talking to a Trekkie (who wants to be called a "Trekker") and have them explain the differences between the various types of ships named Enterprise. It's only important to them.

We can get as twitterpated as we want over it, but it's a semantic detail that wastes time. We don't need to condescendingly correct people, we need them to understand why having 30 rounds in a clip is not a bad thing.

This state perfectly how a large percentage of us feel. In essence,

who cares?

Now, you call O-care a "good health care plan", THEN we have

something to argue about...

mountainman13 09-16-2013 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrazedJava (Post 1373675)

Sure, to us. I know the difference between a magazine and a clip. The problem is that arguing over semantics is a "forest for the trees" situation.

What is your priority? Showing off your superior gun knowledge or having a meaningful debate on why gun control doesn't work?

Believe it or not, you can't have it both ways.

I've worked in the technology field for many years now. I have tons of esoteric knowledge that simply does not translate well to people who are non-technical. In the process of explaining projects or negotiating contracts it is very tempting to start correcting non-technical people on their vernacular. While I always make sure requirements or specification use the correct language, I have found that in trying to convince someone to see things my way or to at least consider my point of view trying to correct them on terminology is a great way to set them against me.

I don't own a single firearm that uses a clip. When I talk to someone who uses that term in reference to modern firearms, I just do a sort of inner head shake and keep my eye on the ball. Getting mired in the details is going to gain me nothing.

Now if I can get someone to the range and is interested in shooting, THAT is the time to do some education.

Can't argue with that. Overloading an idiots brain gets you nowhere fast. Completely agree. There is a time and place for educating. Also agree.
But...in my experience a bit of education can go a long way to converting an anti-gunner.

Quentin 09-16-2013 03:11 PM

It does matter. Gun grabbers use carefully chosen labels to advance their agenda. Like "high capacity clip", "assault rifle", "Saturday night special". These are inflammatory terms to win over people sitting on the 2nd Amendment fence.

Don't fall into their trap, use proper terms, not their labels.

TekGreg 09-16-2013 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CrazedJava (Post 1373675)
Sure, to us. I know the difference between a magazine and a clip. The problem is that arguing over semantics is a "forest for the trees" situation.

What is your priority? Showing off your superior gun knowledge or having a meaningful debate on why gun control doesn't work?

Believe it or not, you can't have it both ways.

I've worked in the technology field for many years now. I have tons of esoteric knowledge that simply does not translate well to people who are non-technical. In the process of explaining projects or negotiating contracts it is very tempting to start correcting non-technical people on their vernacular. While I always make sure requirements or specification use the correct language, I have found that in trying to convince someone to see things my way or to at least consider my point of view trying to correct them on terminology is a great way to set them against me.

I don't own a single firearm that uses a clip. When I talk to someone who uses that term in reference to modern firearms, I just do a sort of inner head shake and keep my eye on the ball. Getting mired in the details is going to gain me nothing.

Now if I can get someone to the range and is interested in shooting, THAT is the time to do some education.

Crazed, I also work in a technical field and agree that when you are trying to come to terms on an agreement that it is of no import if they call a "widget" a "thingamajig" as long as the object is understood to be the same thing. Acting superior in any way is a great way to blow a deal and gains nothing for anyone.

However, the problem comes in this general attitude of the general public. "Whatever" or "I don't care" seems to be the response of almost everyone that doesn't want to exercise a brain cell on anything.

Example: a friend of mine went in to get a tattoo about a month ago. The artist asked him, "do you want this to be illustrative or realistic?" Now, he's a man's man and doesn't want to look stupid, but he doesn't know what illustrative means! Not a common term, and something the artist could easily explain, but he doesn't want to look stupid, so he replies, "Whatever." Can he get upset at the results? Now he could be screaming, "That wasn't what I wanted! You screwed up my arm!"

Or better yet, lets make it life-threatening. Someone who has ridden in a car for 30 years but doesn't want to be bothered with learning to drive is sitting in the passenger seat, looking a different direction than the driver, when he sees someone running a red light and about to hit their car. He shouts to alert the driver, "HIT THE...uhhh...thingy...on the floor...that slows..." WHAM!

If anyone had taken a moment to get past their "whatever" attitude, one wouldn't have a cartoon permanently inked to his arm and the other would be alive. Obviously I'm not saying that the clip vs. magazine thing is worthy of this level of attention, but the "Don't Care/whatever" attitude is.

A good general rule is that if you are in a confrontational posture, don't correct. If you are more congenial, and you can do it without looking like a superior snob, then it doesn't hurt to take a few seconds to educate. Some people find the trivia interesting and you can make it fun instead of demeaning. It's almost always in the way you deliver it, rather than the information itself.


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