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Sniper03 04-14-2014 08:57 PM

How To Keep Range Neighbors Happy
 
Saw this and thought I might share it with my friends on the FTF who attend or are members of a shooting range! It is a little long but I think worth it! I have a personal story at the bottom.


Why put your range or range plans at risk by ignoring neighbor concerns when it’s easy to appease them? Even if they're non-shooters, it’s not hard to make your range welcome in the neighborhood. Here are 10 ways you can improve relations with range neighbors:

1. KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORS. Many range operators have no idea who their neighbors are. A simple way to find out is to ask your county executive’s office for a list of neighbors who will be notified of zoning hearings for your range. Use this list as a guide.

2. NEIGHBOR RELATIONS PERSON. Appoint a neighbor relations (NR) person. This should be a charismatic person in your group who gets along well with others. Keeping neighbors friendly is an ongoing effort that requires regular maintenance. The NR’s job should be to contact or visit each neighbor on a regular basis and ask questions such as, “Any complaints?” or “Anything we can do to help?” He should identify those who represent strong opposition; they may require special treatment.

3. OUTSPOKEN MEMBERS. Every shooting club seems to have at least one. He’s the flag-waver who shouts, “Freedom, liberty,” at meetings. He’s a great person to have on your side, but his rants can often create problems with the public perception of your range–especially at a public zoning hearing. It’s important to retain that person’s support and friendship, but you may want to discourage him from attending such public meetings.

4. STOP RUMORS. You and I both know the damage rumors can cause. They say that if you buy a $1 lottery ticket in a small town and it rewards you with 10 bucks, by the time the story reaches the other side of town, you've won a million dollar jackpot. Don't let rumors about your range fester and grow. Each time you hear one, quickly locate the source and politely correct the person who is spreading it.

5. VOLUNTEER WORK CREW. A wind storm knocks down a couple of trees in a neighbor’s yard. A nearby farmer gets ill and needs help with harvest. A local church needs volunteers for a roofing project. When you're NR identifies one of these problems in the neighborhood, he should have a willing group of volunteers ready to pitch in and help. Of course, you'll want to have the volunteers “correctly attired” with shirts or caps that advertise your club or range.

6. LOCAL CHARITIES. Don’t say “No” when local charities come calling. Charitable donations by a range are great for improving your image. Ranges often have limited budgets, so spend wisely to stretch your dollars. For example, suppose your town asks for a donation to its annual holiday charity drawings. If you donate $20 as a prize, the winner will stick it in the pool and likely forget where it came from. A $20 range pass may have no value if the winner doesn't shoot. Instead, consider spending $20 for a frozen turkey and attach a large label that reminds the winner who donated it. After lugging it around town – telling folks where it came from – the winner will cook and serve it to relatives, also telling them where it came from. You might call this getting maximum mileage from your donation.

7. BUY LOCALLY. When you need supplies or building materials for your range, whenever possible buy locally and make sure the merchant knows that the purchase is being made for your range. Most merchants deal with a broad band of people in the area. Making merchants goodwill ambassadors for your range is a big plus.


8. NEIGHBORHOOD PARTY. Everyone loves a party. So throw a meet-and-greet party once a year and invite the neighbors. This can be held along with an annual club shooting event. Tell neighbors if they'd like to shoot, come at 4 p.m., but if they don't care to shoot, come at 6 p.m. for a free barbecue and a door-prize drawing. Socializing with your neighbors in this manner builds strong relations.

9. JOIN LOCAL CLUBS & CHURCHES. A problem common to small towns and communities is a mistrust of outsiders. Members don't have to live in a community, however, to be accepted. Simply participating in a few local activities such as meetings and church events will make them part of the community and improve your range’s image.

10. UNUSUAL SOLUTIONS. Sometimes a problem requires an unusual solution. Chad Peters, president of the Morristown Gun Club in Morristown, Minn., relates a problem his club had: “A farmer and his wife who lived near the range didn’t like the sound of trapshooting and frequently complained to the county. Then came a year when dairy farmers were struggling with a hay shortage. The club has a small field that members mow and use for overflow parking for two large shoots each year. One member had an idea: Let’s make a deal with the complaining farmer. We'll let him use the field to grow hay, free of charge. In return, ask him to time his mowings to coincide with the club’s two large events. The farmer gladly accepted the free rent offer, and the club no longer had to mow for these events. Something else resulted: The farmer and wife are no longer annoyed by the sound of trapshooting.”

Personal Story: Myself and 5 of my friends are the only ones on a lease in Texas and have been for years. Several years ago the rancher who owns the lease was the victim of a large range fire. The range fire burnt almost every bit of fence down on the thousands of acres of the ranch. Raising cattle this was a disaster! We became a work crew and as always friends with the rancher and formed work parties to help him and his workers replace all the fence destroyed. This past year since he is getting up in age and his health is not the best. He advised if something happened to him, he wanted to take care of all of us. And did consider us all as friends not only as leeses of the ground over the past years. He then this past season signed a 10 year lease with his attorney and us that we can stay on the ground for 10 years. And there will be no increases in price over the 10 years. It is a family ranch when he passes away. This was nothing new since he had not raised the lease fees in years. So moral of the story if you are sincere and good to people most will be the same with you! An ounce of kindness goes a long way! That is why I thought the above information on the firearms range and neighbors was interesting.:)

03

Vincine 04-14-2014 09:27 PM

This what I'm talking about!

'Except' that it's what we all should be doing/acting all the time, and not just to ingratiate ourselves with firing range neighbors. It all a question of scale and personal connections. Outsourcing community needs to distant administrations is a recipe for corruption & waste. Playing well with others works. Community, community, community.

(Soapbox over,)

John_Deer 04-14-2014 09:36 PM

I found that the best way to persuade your neighbors to get along is to hire a very good lawyer. Neighbors will use your property as their own. Then when your shooting interferes with their trespassing they call the sheriff and complain about the noise. They will shoot their own house and claim you did it.

The first words I had with these people after allowing them to ride their 4 wheelers, hunt and shoot without saying a word was "the property owners association says no shooting." I replied I don't belong to your POA and the rules of your POA have no effect on my property. The lawyers have been doing the talking since. I posted my land and made an effort to keep them from trespassing on the advice of my attorney.

Axxe55 04-14-2014 10:50 PM

great post Sniper! you covered a lot of ground with some very good advice and honestly i dont think i can add anything to that.:D

alsaqr 04-14-2014 10:55 PM

Quote:

Neighbors will use your property as their own.
Sniper, that is a very good post on firing ranges. Too many firing range owners act like bulls in china shops and have problems with their neighbors. My own firing range is closed to everything except .22 lr shooting because the 85 year old lady who lives 1/4 mile away is very sick. She don't need to be hearing magnum kabooms.

i own several hunting properties: Have had a problem with only one neighbor. He's a big time farmer/rancher who can't understand my not allowing cattle, hay cutting and wheat planting on the property. The guy trashed his pasture by overgrazing and then wanted to rent my pasture and hayfields; i told him no. He turned his cattle on the place twice. Last time i chased his cattle onto the county road. Next time one of his cows will become Angus or Shorthorn burgers, as the case may be.

John_Deer 04-15-2014 02:43 AM

If his pasture is overgrazed the cattle will literally walk through the fence to get good grass. A cow has to have something to ruminate all the time or they will twist a gut and die.

One of my neighbors puts his stock in my pasture after I cut hay. During that time he fertilizes his pasture and makes major fence repairs. He will let me keep livestock at his place and he keeps my fences usable. We get along well.

It is the subdivision that was built on the the other side of my property that is my PITA. Those people are nuts. They are surrounded by rednecks and farmland. Yet they think we are to stupid to keep them on their 1.5 acre lot because we speak with a drawl and don't wear a suit. We have a huge advantage on them. We know everyone in county government and got our land zoned when their subdivision was a corn field.

Axxe55 04-15-2014 02:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John_Deer (Post 1558778)
If his pasture is overgrazed the cattle will literally walk through the fence to get good grass. A cow has to have something to ruminate all the time or they will twist a gut and die.

One of my neighbors puts his stock in my pasture after I cut hay. During that time he fertilizes his pasture and makes major fence repairs. He will let me keep livestock at his place and he keeps my fences usable. We get along well.

It is the subdivision that was built on the the other side of my property that is my PITA. Those people are nuts. They are surrounded by rednecks and farmland. Yet they think we are to stupid to keep them on their 1.5 acre lot because we speak with a drawl and don't wear a suit. We have a huge advantage on them. We know everyone in county government and got our land zoned when their subdivision was a corn field.

JD, the subject of the thread is about gun ranges, not private property, and how to keep the people living nearby to the gun range happy so everyone is happy.

Boyerracing343 04-15-2014 03:56 AM

Excellent write up.

KG7IL 04-15-2014 04:28 AM

Thanks for the post.
I have a home range and you have some good ideas for me as well.

GTX63 04-15-2014 11:20 AM

I'm out in the sticks but we have a house on either side of us. Back when we first moved in, we would hear shooting in their timber weekly; moreso during hunting seasons. It just seemed like that's what folks did out here. When I would bring up to the neighbors that we might be out back popping cans they would just grunt or keep talking about something else. It just isn't an issue here, but I can understand most places it would be.


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