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-   -   How I practice shooting. What do you think? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/how-i-practice-shooting-what-do-you-think-17789/)

aliendroid 09-07-2009 06:58 PM

How I practice shooting. What do you think?
 
So I've owned a handgun for over 10 years but never really tried to learn to shoot well until one day at the firing range I noticed from about 7 yards that I was grouping them on the target but not on the x and I asked the guy at the counter what I was doing wrong. To cut the story short I paid for 2 hours of lessons. Now I can put every bullet in a 6 inch diameter group from 15 yards whereas before from that distance I couldn't even hit the target half the time and that was only 3 shooting sessions ago :eek: .

My problem is that I brace and flench before for the recoil, so the way I've been working that out is with fake plastic bullets.

I fill a mag with 3 real : 1 fake bullet at random and I try to shoot so that when I happen to come on a plastic bullet, my sights do not move away from the x after the trigger is pulled. Very hard to do.
Next I fill a mag with 1 real bulet : 3 fake bullets at random and do the same thing. It is easier to do when the chance of the next bullet being fake is higher.
Then I repeat over and over switching between the two above ratios.
I find that my shooting gets better between the start and end of each shooting session. The last mag has only real bullets in it.

Are there any other tips that people out there have to getting better?

IGETEVEN 09-07-2009 07:48 PM

1 Attachment(s)
You already are doing a good firing practice exercise using the mix snap caps or plastic rounds and live rounds in your mags. Continue this with several mix and match mags loaded with the snap caps or plastic rounds and live rounds, not knowing when a dummy round will chamber. Doing this will get you proficient in controlling your sight picture and not dropping the front sight during your follow through trigger squeeze, no matter what round chambers. A Note about Pulling the Trigger. Your trigger pull should be a smoothly applied, constantly increasing force, like you are depressing a spring. Hell, you are depressing a spring. One of the mental games that helped me quite a bit is this:

Pretend that the front sight is attached to the trigger. When pressure is applied to the trigger, the front sight moves rearward towards the rear sight. The goal of pulling the trigger is to pull the front sight post straight though the center of the rear sight notch. With enough practice, you will feel like you are steering the gun with the trigger, mainly because you are. Here is a very helpful chart that will give you an idea of what you may see if you are not following through correctly in your shot placement. It's a keeper. Practice, practice and more practice. :)

Jack

ktmboyz 09-07-2009 07:56 PM

Dummy rounds are also excellent for the practice of clearing misfires or malfunctions. Tap, rack and refire

Rentacop 09-07-2009 08:20 PM

Try the bump drill : Aim in and keep pressing the trigger and releasing it until you accidentally fire a shot. Then you'll see what a surprise break is.

Here's a link to Bruce Gray's bump drill video :
DOWN RANGE TELEVISION with Michael Bane - DOWN RANGE TV - DRTV

mr1911 09-07-2009 09:30 PM

I'm no bullseye specialist, but after years of self deffense practice I noticed trigger controll to be the greatest asset to accuracy, focus on your trigger, ignore re-coil as if it doesn't even exist, the more you shoot the less you'll even notice any recoil and all the flinching and jerking will go away.

aliendroid 09-08-2009 02:28 PM

Thanks for the tips

aliendroid 09-08-2009 02:36 PM

I'm going to the range today. I've been going about once per week.

TelstaR 09-13-2009 12:19 AM

This is why I alway suggest that a person learn the basics with a 22 revolver. They dont get the bad habits and when they move up to higher cal they dont get the flinch.

G21.45 09-13-2009 03:11 AM

:rolleyes: Oh, boy! I'm debating: Should I make you some of you guys smarter, or just remain quiet?

I've been training people how to shoot for almost 25 years. I've seen it all; I've done it all, too. You do NOT, 'steer' a pistol with the trigger. If you have that impression it's only because you have a correct grip on the pistol's frame; and, that grip is leading you to believe that you're, 'steering' the front sight by some other means than a proper grasp.

At 16 yards I can empty a magazine into a 4" circle as fast as the slide will cycle. (I'll post proof if anyone wants to see some of my targets.) Let me talk to you about that presumed, 'trigger flinch' you're working on: It's NOT really a flinch. It only looks that way to the, perhaps, cognizant but, otherwise, unwitting eye.

What you are actually dealing with is an, 'OUT-OF-SEQUENCE' reflex action. When you learn how to fire a pistol very quickly AND very accurately you will discover that you actually need to, 'flinch' in order to manage the front sight and hit the target well.

'Flinch' at the wrong time in the same manner that most people do when firing at a slower rate and what you'll see (among other things) is the muzzle taking a nose dive. 'Reflex' at the right time and what you'll see is the front sight pull back down and, nest approximately 2/3rd's of its height into the rear sight notch. (One of the secrets of shooting very quickly is to always hold slightly low on the target; that way you don't have to wait on the front sight to fully nest.)

'Ball & dummy' drills are a good way for any semiskilled pistol shooter to learn how to hit the target. The problem is that the best combat pistol shooters, all, have to move on past this stage of personal performance. Over the years I have developed a specific training regimen for learning how to do this while expending the fewest possible number of rounds.

I'll be honest with you: I don't need the glory and don't feel like posting any of the particulars over the internet. If you want to get into this further with me, send a PM. I don't mind taking up this subject with you in personal correspondence.

For now what you're doing is fine. However, what you don't want to do is to remain on the present, 'learning plateau' forever. You do NOT control the muzzle with the trigger. Furthermore, when you get really good at this, inside 12 yards you really don't need the front sight. You can hit the target, strictly, off the back of the slide. ;)

IGETEVEN 09-13-2009 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G21.45 (Post 158868)
Oh, boy! I'm debating: Should I make you some of you guys smarter, or just remain quiet?

I've been training people how to shoot for almost 25 years. I've seen it all; I've done it all, too. You do NOT, 'steer' a pistol with the trigger.

At 16 yards I can empty a magazine into a 4" circle as fast as the slide will cycle.

The problem is that the best combat pistol shooters, all, have to move on past this stage of personal performance.

I'll be honest with you: I don't need the glory and don't feel like posting any of the particulars over the internet.

Furthermore, when you get really good at this, inside 12 yards you really don't need the front sight. You can hit the target, strictly, off the back of the slide. ;)



1). With all due respect, and barely sir, you should of taken your own advice and remained quiet.

2). I don't know where you have been for almost a year, and out of nowhere, you show up and you are the authority and final word on firearms training and shooting technics. Where are your manors, patience and courtesy that one would expect from a well seasoned instructor like yourself. You show up here and proceed to tell everyone that their way of shooting and training is all wrong and yours is the only right way. You would think in 25 years, especially for someone who has "seen it all and has done it all too" as you claim, one would be familiar with several different training and shooting exercises and know that everyone instructs and learns differently. And as long as poor training technics are not used and poor shooting habits result from the instructions, the end results will be proper firearm handling and learned shooting habits.

I did not have the privilege of learning my shooting and firearms instructions through an "NRA Instructor" all my real training and experience came from military instructors, with years of real shooting and training experience. Daily and continuously hands on practicing and shooting with close team members. Exposure, training and proficient use of various handguns, rifles and ordinances. Real combat experience and various firearms and training schools (sniper). Real world shooting at various targets that get close, move, shoot back, and bleed for just as long or longer than you claim. I still train and shoot with civilian, military, police and SWAT qualified instructors with the same years of training, skills and experience that you have stated and I still continue to learn. ;)

3). If you were honest and you did not feel you did not need the glory as you stated, to post over the internet, you sure seem to be tooting your own horn awfully loud. :rolleyes:

4). "When you get really good at this, inside 12 yards you really don't need the front sight. You can hit the target, strictly, off the back of the slide."

This is the only shooting advice that you stated, that IMHO, was the only true final product from real shooting experience worth listening to for any beginners or advanced shooters.

Thank you for enlightening this forum with your superior knowledge and obvious skills and your many years of firearms instruction. I hope your advice will not be confused for arrogance and ego by the other forum members. It is always nice to hear advice, comments, and beneficial shooting instructions and opinions from qualified instructors like yourself and other experienced forum members. I myself, have in all of this, learned something new sir, from even you. :)

Jack


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