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-   -   Fragged On The Range This AM. (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/fragged-range-am-6308/)

gorknoids 08-16-2008 09:21 PM

Fragged On The Range This AM.
 
Took a piece of copper with a lead smear on it to the chin this AM from another lane. I'd just reloaded and was preparing to shoot, when I was hit from the right side by what I first thought was spent brass, but traveling really fast, and from the wrong side. The blood trickling and the burning sensation were my first clues that it wasn't brass, and the stuff was still hot when I pulled it out. I don't know if someone hit a target frame or what happened, but I'm curious if anyone else has had this happen, particularly competition shooters and career rangemasters. The fragment came at me 90 degrees from the right through a gap in the partition, was perfectly flat, and was definitely part of a copper jacketed round fired in a 45' range.
The severity of the wound is nothing. The potential (Located just about equidistant between my right eye and my right jugular vein) is sort of weirding me out. So, if you've got a story, let's rap.

Dillinger 08-16-2008 11:39 PM

Boy, you are lucky indeed brother. I haven't had this happen, nor has it happened when I have been at the range.

We have had two guys who have "mushroomed" a pencil thin hunting barrel with hot reloads. The last guy had to get his hand cast because he broke two knuckles on his front hand.

Nothing compared to taking a hot piece of lead/copper between the eye and the jugular.

Buy yourself a lottery ticket - it sounds like you have got the lucky touch at the moment.

Here's hoping you heal up, both physically and mentally, in a short period of time.

JD

gorknoids 08-17-2008 12:04 AM

LOL! Maybe I'll get some therapy...
After a career in Naval aviation ordnance, this was comical. I'm just wondering if anyone has experienced fragments making their way back to the firing line with enough force to cut to the meat. The rangemaster (Or civilian equivalent) said that he would have the backstop cleaned, but the chunk that hit me was still hot enough to burn my fingers.
It was an absolute fluke, no doubt, but the mechanics of what wrought it have me flummoxed. I've been shooting something or another for 35 years or so, and have never seen anything like this.

cpttango30 08-17-2008 03:11 AM

I have not but I seen a guy on Youtube that shoot some steel targets at 100 yards with a 50bmg take a shot to the head. Knocked his ear muffs right off his head.

G21.45 08-17-2008 05:23 AM

:) Yes, more times than I can count! Several years ago at the Greater Pittsburgh Rod & Gun Club I was down in the pistol defilades well beneath the crest of the hill behind which the trap range is located. While standing in line waiting for my turn at the pepper poppers, I was struck - hard - in the back of the head by descending shot charges.

After the third time I got hit, I suddenly noticed that nobody was standing next to me! Everybody thought it was quite funny that I'd been hit 3 times in the back of the head within, about, an hour's time. They were joking with me; but, they were serious, too. The jinx finally got broken when another pistol shooter suddenly grabbed his shoulder and went, 'ouch'!

I guess what I'm saying is that when it's your turn, it's your turn; and, you're going to take the hit!

Years ago we used to shoot at an uphill pistol pit with a 100 yard rifle range behind a low dirt berm over the left shoulder. Once you were in the pit you couldn't quite see the rifle range; but, if that range was active, you would constantly hear the whiz and whine of centerfire bullet jackets and fragments flying just over the top of your head AFTER they had smacked into the backstop.

One thing I have against standing on the line at an indoor range is the metal target frames that other shooters on one or both sides will set at, about, 7 yards and start blasting away at. As pistol marksmen these guys universally stink; their bullet patterns are all over the target; and, you're absolutely correct, if they hit the frame you could get a piece of - not the bullet, but - the jacket coming right back at you.

The indoor range I use keeps everyone in the center of the room and close together - except for the guys they know can shoot. This protects their walls from being hit and allows some of us to be farther away from the shootout and flying brass in the center of the line.

I always wear expensive industrial grade safety glasses with photogray lens and large side shields; and, I've never regretted paying the price. Fortunately, what happened to you is rare; it does happen, but not often.

Still, things tend to run in threes; so, try not to stand close to other shooters for awhile. The good part is that when something like this happens the bounce-back angles are usually shallow; consequently, the farther you are to either side the better! ;)

RL357Mag 08-17-2008 02:49 PM

I've had fragments hit me from people shooting revolvers with too much cylinder play. That's fairly common, and another reason I don't use public ranges anymore.

gorknoids 08-17-2008 07:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RL357Mag (Post 36540)
I've had fragments hit me from people shooting revolvers with too much cylinder play. That's fairly common, and another reason I don't use public ranges anymore.

That is probably what happened, now that you mention it.

G21.45 08-17-2008 11:57 PM

Forcing cone splatter is usually very fine - About the size of grains of sand. Is that what you were hit with?

RL357Mag 08-18-2008 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G21.45 (Post 36590)
Forcing cone splatter is usually very fine - About the size of grains of sand. Is that what you were hit with?


That depends on how badly out of time the cylinder is - I have a real old H&R .38 S&W Top Break that I don't shoot anymore because the cylinder lock-up is so sloppy I get about two degrees of rotation in either direction when it is cocked. I had a brass-framed replica Colt .44 Sheriff's Model black powder pistol from Western Arms that now sleeps at the bottom of the Croton Resevoir....it shot so badly out of time that it was dangerous.

gorknoids 08-18-2008 04:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by G21.45 (Post 36590)
Forcing cone splatter is usually very fine - About the size of grains of sand. Is that what you were hit with?

No, it was about 1/2 the size of my pinky fingernail and made a cut about 3/4 of an inch long. Copper with some lead on it, and about as thick as a light guitar pick. It was still hot enough to burn my finger when I pulled it out. It looked like a shaving more than anything.


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