do you train in bad light sometimes? - Page 2
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Old 07-01-2014, 01:57 PM   #11
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We are required to do a night qual each year. Night sites are required on all duty handguns. 95% have weapon mounted lights. Unfortuantely, with budget constraints actual training after dark has been severely curtailed.

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Old 07-01-2014, 06:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rentacop View Post
I have Tritium night sights on my 1911 . I tried drawing and sighting in a dark bathroom and found I mistook one of the rear dots for the front dot . These sights are worthless as far as I'm concerned .

Makes me sure the OP is a troll .
You just need more practice. They make night sights with different colored dots on the front and rear sights for 'less coordinated' shooters.
If I knew for a fact I was going to be in a shoot out in low light and had to chose between my vest and night sights I would take the night sights every time. Night sights increase hit probability 1000+% in low light.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:47 PM   #13
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When I took my ccw class six years ago they had a shooting in the dark part to it. It was way above the requirements for the State of Colorado. I was in a pitch black room. It was an indoor range. There was an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper stapled to a sheet of cardboard about 7 yards in front of you. I am guessing distance. I guy flashes a flashlight across the target for about 2 seconds. It was to simulate a car driving by and its headlights shining in your window for a second or two. I was able to dump 10 rounds into that sheet of paper without missing. I haven't felt a need to do it since.

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Old 07-10-2014, 11:05 PM   #14
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I always read and hear about the so called arm chair experts stating that you need better sights, IE: night sights, etc. For home defense this is "NOT" the case. You know your home better than anyone else ever could (situational awareness). Point shooting, without the use of sights for close quarters combat is your best training option. Remember that anything within the average home will be very close quarters. I have trained people in close quarters combat for many, many years. Remember, most encounters in the home will be in near or total darkness and sights will be of no value to you. If you have family members in the home, you need to formulate a plan with them for identification in any given situation to alleviate mistaken identity. Your hand gun should become an extension of your hand and point just like your index finger would as if you were looking at the target and pointing at the same time. Try it, look at a target and point your index finger at the target at the same time without looking at your finger. Then look at what your finger is pointing at. Your hand gun should do the same thing. It takes quite a lot of practice to become proficient at point shooting, but if you are using a hand gun for home defense, you need to learn to make it an extension of your hand without having to think about it. Commonly called muscle memory, it takes practice to achieve and practice to maintain. If you can't learn it on your own, seek someone out who can train you in the art of point shooting. You will be in a much better position to defend your home and family.




Jim.................

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Old 07-15-2014, 02:11 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by masterPsmith View Post
I always read and hear about the so called arm chair experts stating that you need better sights, IE: night sights, etc. For home defense this is "NOT" the case. You know your home better than anyone else ever could (situational awareness). Point shooting, without the use of sights for close quarters combat is your best training option. Remember that anything within the average home will be very close quarters. I have trained people in close quarters combat for many, many years. Remember, most encounters in the home will be in near or total darkness and sights will be of no value to you. If you have family members in the home, you need to formulate a plan with them for identification in any given situation to alleviate mistaken identity. Your hand gun should become an extension of your hand and point just like your index finger would as if you were looking at the target and pointing at the same time. Try it, look at a target and point your index finger at the target at the same time without looking at your finger. Then look at what your finger is pointing at. Your hand gun should do the same thing. It takes quite a lot of practice to become proficient at point shooting, but if you are using a hand gun for home defense, you need to learn to make it an extension of your hand without having to think about it. Commonly called muscle memory, it takes practice to achieve and practice to maintain. If you can't learn it on your own, seek someone out who can train you in the art of point shooting. You will be in a much better position to defend your home and family.




Jim.................
Jim,
This is what I teach, and have done so for MANY years also. Two things.
1. To be proficient at point shooting you MUST have a 'grip' witch results in your 'trigger' finger being parallel to the 'bore line'. Most of the semi-autos achieve this with a factory grip, but older revolvers require you to experiment with grips to find the one which is 'natural' to the shooter. When this is achieved you will find the to be almost second nature to those with normal eye/hand coordination to shoot very well.
2. To day there is a culture which has been pushing laser sights very hard as the 'ultimate' sighting procedure. I have nothing against lasers IF you learn to point shoot first!!!! As matter of fact lasers can be used to teach point shooting.
As I have said MANY times, "Murphy is alive and well and living in your basement" so don't count on technology when your life is at stake.
(another) Jim
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Old 07-16-2014, 11:12 PM   #16
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I do practice shooting from the hip when I am playing a 22lr pistol. It would be prudent to practice shooting from the hip with my carry guns. I doubt there will be any difference between the 22 pistols and a larger caliber.

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Old 07-16-2014, 11:56 PM   #17
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Every month or so when I am on my training schedule I have a shoot that runs from day into night so I can train with my night sights and lights. For most people who carry a defensive firearm might realize you are more likely to use it at night in the city so why not have the advantage over a perp of being able to see your sights? Or if you can run around in the dark bob mundaning it then power to you.

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