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Old 10-17-2011, 04:09 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Soliferrum View Post
too bad were all not green berets. never mind my post. everyones a bad ass congratulations. im going to go pick a fight and disarm my attacker using a series of head butts.
LOL, let us know how that works out for you.

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Old 10-17-2011, 04:57 PM   #12
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Soliferrum,

I have a feeling, regardless of what I say here, you are one of those guys that need to see, hear, experience it yourself (and that, is not bad), but I would like to comment on your theory, and would bet there are other members here who would be interested in your findings, as well.



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Originally Posted by Soliferrum View Post
one opened up with the picture of the class charging at the camera with their war faces on and such. and of course everyone had a form of AR. It kept on about how it teaches defensive stances and preached function rather than form. which is always good, but please someone explain to me a "defensive stance." ...isnt that for fist fighting? im not quite sure but i think i have enough knowledge that in a gunfight with rifles, unless you have a substantial about of cover between you and your target, you shouldnt be standing much at all.
The defensive stance isn't how you "stand to fight", as in meaning you will remain stationery during the fighting. Your opinion that, if not behind cover you shouldn't be a stationery, is very correct. Most fights, regardless of weapon type, are dynamic in nature. Movement induces the challenge of connecting regardless of the means, bullet, hand, club, blade, etc. The "defensive stance", positions the body to offer the best advantage when moving and engaging, or moving and avoidance. We refer to this a fighting stance, and more specific as "your fighting stance".....the stance you can develop based on your physical stature, the lethal tool you are using, your body flexibility, and the specific conditions at the moment of the fight.



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Originally Posted by Soliferrum View Post
Other pictures showed a "unique" grip on the rifles they teach. the non firing hand is almost fully extended, small small bend in the elbow, the thumb is over the top of the rifle grip, the web of the hand being almost up against the front sight post. they said this grip helps in target acquisition. i said "meh, what the hell." doing that myself i learned almost all of my left peripheral vision was gone. im not sure how im supposed to fight with my left eye completely blocked. and before anyone says "well its closed anyway cause youre aiming." youre supposed to keep both eyes open when using an optical.
The "unique" hold you refer to is called the "extended hold" (there are I'm sure other names for this). The extended hold is becoming very popular with competition shooters and has found it's way into some tactical schools. We prefer the "mag well hold" as we feel it gives you better control during the dynamic movement of a fight, positions the secondary hand closer to the gun controls, gives better vision (not that much), and also keeps the body parts tighter for CQB and almost all none-standing positions. Nonetheless, it is an advantage for some to trim a fraction of a second off their score when competing. Beings we conduct a Fighting School, we prefer those positions and holds which are more likely to help win on the 2-way range, rather than the game environment of the 1-way range.

As for the two eye open thing.....I agree, if you can shoot with both eyes open, it should be an advantage, however there are those who shoot with one eye closed (right handed shooter, left eye dominate), who have learned to be very effective in a fight.




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Originally Posted by Soliferrum View Post
on another review for handguns, different school, they were showing actual lessons in, for lack of a better term, fist fighting with a handgun. bad guy with a knife, good guy showing block with left hand and pulling weapon with his right, as well as PULLING THE BAD GUY CLOSER to close the distance and putting the barrel against him......if i know i have a gun and a guy pulls out anything, im going to push him or get as far away from him as humanly possible cause i know im just going to unload on him when i get the quickest chance, and heres this tool wanting the complete opposite. im not sure if anyone told him in arms distance a knife is ungodly more deadly than a gun.
Our handgun training involves distances as close as chest-to-chest with muzzle pressed to the body, out to 100 yards. Carbine training includes the similar chest-to-chest, out to 300 yards, and precision rifle from chest-to-chest, out to 1,000 yards (and beyond). How and when you draw a handgun and at what distance from the aggressor, under what circumstances is a bit more complex than can be addressed in a post, but as a general rule.....if the handgun is holstered and the bad guy has a knife within several feet......"going to guns" is most likely going to get you cut beyond repair. In other words, our reaction should not be to draw and fire, because by the time we do that, we will have already been sliced or stabbed multiple times. That does not mean we would never pull the gun, just that most handgun students feel the their gun is the answer to all attacks, and the bloody fact is, when at physical contact distance, most likely the gun is not the best defense.



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Originally Posted by Soliferrum View Post
im going to start looking for places to go around the northeast texas area and my biggest fear is paying for a class i will leave in a few hours cause im being taught useless lessons by a pompous know it all, who dosent.
We will stack our training up against any other with confidence. That being said, we are not the end-all of training and always recommend our students attend any of the other quality schools across the nation. Unfortunately there are schools and trainers out there who are not presenting what we would consider to be valuable training. Also, because of the industry, it may be difficult for students, in some areas of the country, to find a quality school of their liking. The good side is, there are many, many quality schools and very qualified teachers available.

Until you have attended some training, it is not fair to the schools and especially not fair to you, to second guess and grade them by what you see and read in the gun rags. Of all the sources available to us in the shooting and training industry, the most unregulated and misleading, in my opinion, are gun magazines! (keeping in mind I occasionally read them!!) Nonetheless, you present a valid point. You have one of the premiere training schools in the country, Thunder Ranch, in Texas. Although this is not northern Texas, it wouldn't be that much of a journey. Clint Smith moved from the Texas location to his new home training facility in Oregon, but is still conducting classes at the Mt. Home original location. I would think there are many other fine schools in Texas and probably some in your back yard. Perhaps other members can give you a recommendation.

In Arizona we have hundreds of schools, especially in the Phoenix Metro area and most are at best qualified to conduct a CCW class. However, there are a couple worth the dollar and time.....we like to think we are one of them. There is also Gunsite, a couple hours north of Phoenix. Although not the quality it once was (just an opinion....), it is still a value and will always be the center that started it all.

In my opinion, there are no schools that have it all, know it all, present it all. There are however, many schools which lead the industry with quality and value. One thing for sure.....once you have attended a couple classes at a couple different schools, you will be much better prepared to make a judgement of there value. And even if the school you first select doesn't stand up to your current standards, I bet you will learn a lot and be glad you stuck out the day.

.
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