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-   -   Rifle Refinishing Duracoat HK Black (semi gloss) in Charlotte, NC Area (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f54/rifle-refinishing-duracoat-hk-black-semi-gloss-charlotte-nc-area-30137/)

ARnoob 08-06-2010 08:12 PM

Rifle Refinishing Duracoat HK Black (semi gloss) in Charlotte, NC Area
 
I'm thinking of having my SAR 3 and M70 Ab2 refinished in Duracoat HK Black (semi gloss). I really like that look. Do you guys know of anyone in the Charlotte, NC area who does this? What should that cost me? I know that I could refinish it myself with the $50 kit, but I don't have the proper area/tools to strip and degrease the original finish.

Thanks!

ARnoob 08-11-2010 05:16 PM

I was looking at a site that has some of the official Duracoat patterns, and the Multicam looks nice. I also kind of like the Russian "Flora" pattern.

I think that I'll just have the poly furniture of my Arsenal 106fr Duracoated instead of the entire rifle.


http://www.houtsenterprises.net/medi...USSIANARMY.jpg

http://www.houtsenterprises.net/medi...MULTICOLOR.jpg

danf_fl 08-12-2010 01:19 AM

Have you thought about doing it yourself? Duracoat cures at room temp and takes about 2 weeks. Brownells has aerosol cans of the stuff.

TheOldMan 08-12-2010 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danf_fl (Post 330164)
Have you thought about doing it yourself? Duracoat cures at room temp and takes about 2 weeks. Brownells has aerosol cans of the stuff.


Using the aerosol cans is gonna suck especially if it's your first time. Most often the can will freeze up on you while you're spryaing prompting you to keep dipping the can in luke warm water to avoid that from happening. You could get set up with an air brush kit for less than $100 if you shop around.

I use a 2.5 gal. compressor from HomeDepot and an airbrush I picked up at a Hobby shop for about $26. If you do end up doing it yourself, make sure to follow the directions to the letter and measure correctly. Preping the firearm well is also a must..

Take it from me, you will aprreciate the results much better knowing you did it yourself too.

By the way, Duracoat does not come premixed in aerosol cans..

CA357 08-12-2010 04:11 PM

I'm going to use Aluma Hyde II from Brownell's on my 1917. I'll post pictures of how it turns out. It is a no bake finish and comes in an aerosol can.

ARnoob 08-13-2010 03:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOldMan (Post 330478)
Using the aerosol cans is gonna suck especially if it's your first time. Most often the can will freeze up on you while you're spryaing prompting you to keep dipping the can in luke warm water to avoid that from happening. You could get set up with an air brush kit for less than $100 if you shop around.

I use a 2.5 gal. compressor from HomeDepot and an airbrush I picked up at a Hobby shop for about $26. If you do end up doing it yourself, make sure to follow the directions to the letter and measure correctly. Preping the firearm well is also a must..

Take it from me, you will aprreciate the results much better knowing you did it yourself too.

By the way, Duracoat does not come premixed in aerosol cans..

Yeah, I have thought about doing it myself, but I'm not experienced with an airbrush or even the cans. I looked around at places that offer the service, and it certainly is expensive.

I'd be happy with just having the furniture Duracoated, but it would still cost quite a bit.

ARnoob 08-13-2010 03:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CA357 (Post 330483)
I'm going to use Aluma Hyde II from Brownell's on my 1917. I'll post pictures of how it turns out. It is a no bake finish and comes in an aerosol can.

I'd love to see how yours turns out.

danf_fl 08-13-2010 06:43 AM

I do stand corrected about Duracoat and aerosol cans. I apologize for the mistaken information.

In any spray painting (can, gun, air brush), runs will normally come when the piece being sprayed is upright. As with shooting, practice is very useful.
With my first frame, I used GunKote and a small gravity feed spray gun. After baking, the wife saw how it turned out and had me do some brass coated knobs. The knobs are still complete with no flaking, peeling, chipping, or any other problems. and these are on cabinets that the knobs are grabbed throughout the day.

(A good practice is to grab a spray can and "paint" a sheet of cardboard leaning against something. Or a metal outside piece of furniture. Hit Wallyworld and spend a couple of bucks. You will learn that light spraying will last longer, be neater, than graffitti on a railroad side car.)

TheOldMan 08-13-2010 01:53 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ARnoob (Post 330716)
Yeah, I have thought about doing it myself, but I'm not experienced with an airbrush or even the cans. I looked around at places that offer the service, and it certainly is expensive.

I'd be happy with just having the furniture Duracoated, but it would still cost quite a bit.

A can certainly appreciate your apprehention in wanting to dive in and do this yourself. I didn't know the first thing about using an airbrush either until I did my first gun but it turned out very nice. I've added a picture of the alloy frame of a winchester 290 that I did for a friend of mine. Key things to remember is to follow the directions to the letter (both in shaking the bottle for three minutes after the ball releases inside and getting the correct mix between paint and hardener).. For very reasonable cost, I think it pays for itself. Firearm prep is also key to a good finish.

lonyaeger 08-13-2010 02:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by danf_fl (Post 330164)
Have you thought about doing it yourself? Duracoat cures at room temp and takes about 2 weeks. Brownells has aerosol cans of the stuff.

I did both my AR and my 10/22 with Duracoat. I used the kit.

You said "strip the original finish." Unless the gun has been painted before, yoiu don't have to do anything to the existing finish, other than degrease it, which is ESSENTIAL.

It's easy to do. It looks fantastic. Doesn't take a lot of room. Does NOT take two weeks to cure, unless you're going to put the weapon through the wringer. You can reassemble and use within a few days. And it's fun!

I'll post photos of the two rifles I did when I get a chance.


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