Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > Engraving & Refinishing > Refinishing: why no mention of Rustoleum?

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Old 03-05-2010, 04:13 PM   #21
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Several governments, most notably the British back in and around the World Wars used to paint their weapons. I don't know the formulation they used, but it was both an ugly flat black and very durable. Way more durable than bluing. Kind of similar to black crinkle coat we used to see on electric motors designed for engine rooms and sump pump rooms. I have handled several weapons with those British coatings, all 40 years old back then (20 years or so ago) and all of them without a trace of bare metal. Were they repainted by some armorer when scuffed down to the bare metal? I dunno. I do know that in private hands they showed little trace of wear.

The downside is they were not beautiful weapons that let you see your reflection in them. Quite the opposite in fact, tool marks evident through the paint, sometimes applied so thickly the proof marks and other stampings were barely visible.

I still have an Inglis with this paint coating. I admire its tough durability, and also believe it is a good choice for a weapon to be carried in sentry duty in all weather year after year, or carried through the mud on a war lasting four or five years or ten, perhaps passed on to three or four owners as each one becomes another casualty and the gun is reissued. However, (hopefully) none of my own guns suffer those kinds of persistently nasty environments.

I had a Jennings .22 once, back when the company was so brand new their guns weren't yet labeled as junk, and it boasted a baked on Teflon finish. Looked really nice on day one. Three or four years of daily concealed carry (loaded with a mix of Stingers and solids) as a back up piece in a dedicated pants pocket, and there was no finish at all on it. Teflon flakes off and peels. No one told me that when I bought it. Every night another piece, usually a pinhead sized flake would be gone till eventually it was all gone.

I learned Black Chrome flakes too. I was issued an Asp with that coating once. It too within a decade had flaked to bare metal in many spots.

Nickel can flake and peel too incidentally. Many older nickel guns that were actually used or carried exhibit this.

These days I am leaning towards parkerizing of very polished (i.e., 1,000 grit) pistols as being the best of both worlds as a way of combining the durability of a military finish with a good looking gun.

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Old 09-18-2010, 02:09 AM   #22
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I used high temp header paint to refinish half a Cobray once. My buddy used the rest on his AR. They looked awesome at first and they were unblemished. The durability wasn't really there because the shade scratched easily. The super gloss chrome on the upper lasted and looked better because it went on thicker. It wasn't a liquid that needed high temperatures to cure properly.

The paint had a weird lingering odor because it never cured. A flowery smelling firearm is wrong for many reasons so I sold the pistol. He sold his AR for the same reason.

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Old 09-25-2010, 02:07 PM   #23
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With so many bake on and spray on gun finishes out on the market these days, why would anyone consider using Krylon or Rustoleum? Neither one of these products are made for gun surfaces to start with. They will not last .. they will scratch off and flake off over time.

Duracoat and products like that are (in my opinion) the only way to go if you are looking for a spray on finish. Parkarizing is a very good option as well if you've got the money and space to properly set up for it same as hot bluing. But the hardware store brands of spray paints should never be used for guns of any sort.

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Old 09-29-2010, 08:45 PM   #24
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Duracoat and products like that are (in my opinion) the only way to go if you are looking for a spray on finish. Parkarizing is a very good option as well if you've got the money and space to properly set up for it same as hot bluing. But the hardware store brands of spray paints should never be used for guns of any sort.[/QUOTE]

I might agree, maybe on the metal. But I've used a rustolieum texture spray on paint on a composite stock with wonderful results. The rifle has made several trips to the range in the past 4 years and looks as good as it did the day it was painted. I also believe there are products that were developed for metal that are just as good as duracoat, but i also believe if you are going to redo the metal, Blue it or Parkarize it. Just my opinion. I don,t expect anyone to agree with me but thats the way I feel.

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Old 09-30-2010, 03:01 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dteed4094 View Post
Duracoat and products like that are (in my opinion) the only way to go if you are looking for a spray on finish. Parkarizing is a very good option as well if you've got the money and space to properly set up for it same as hot bluing. But the hardware store brands of spray paints should never be used for guns of any sort.
I might agree, maybe on the metal. But I've used a rustolieum texture spray on paint on a composite stock with wonderful results. The rifle has made several trips to the range in the past 4 years and looks as good as it did the day it was painted. I also believe there are products that were developed for metal that are just as good as duracoat, but i also believe if you are going to redo the metal, Blue it or Parkarize it. Just my opinion. I don,t expect anyone to agree with me but thats the way I feel.[/QUOTE]


I appologize.. Should have been more specific. Spray on finishes like rustoleum and krylon will work just fine on wood and composits if that is what you choose to do "however", those types of spray on paints are not suitable for gun metal. They simply will never withstand the test of time. Believe me, I have tried this back when I first started doing restorations on my own pieces.

Bluing (whether hot or cold) and parkerizing are great finish options on metal. Duracoat and products like it are great on metal AND composits and wood. If you are wnating to restore your backyard BBQ or outdoor furniture? Then Rusty and Krylon are good choices. Also, Header paints and the like are not good choices for guns. In my opinion, if you're gonna restore a gun, use stuff made for them... Not much more money and you will be much happier in the long run.
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:48 PM   #26
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Can anyone think of a reason why the $5 bottle of 'kick arse' grill/high temp Rustoleum wouldn't be superior to the $8+ "commercial" grade of (say) Krylon/Sherwin Williams, which I hear is essentially Duracoat (or maybe it was Guncoat, I'm not sure)?
The one reason cheap grill paint is not a good choice for a gun finish is that a gun needs to be cleaned to keep it shooting accurate. That means the finish needs to be able to hold up to gun cleaners, and most paints don't. But there are a few paints that are chemical resistant like this one.
VHT Engine Enamel™
The VHT engine enamel has a very good chemical resistance I did a test on a scrap piece of metal before using it on my guns. On this test piece after curing the paint by baking I scrubbed it with acetone in a scotch-brite pad it dulled the finish a bit but it didn't come off like the normal grill paint.
I only use this paint on guns that were painted from the factory like the AMD65.

Other guns that need bluing I use Birchwood Casey's super blue or perma blue to finish.
For the best procedure to apply this BC bluing check out my post on this link.
http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f54/birchwood-casey-super-blue-29402/index2.html
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Old 10-05-2010, 02:50 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caimlas View Post

Can anyone think of a reason why the $5 bottle of 'kick arse' grill/high temp Rustoleum wouldn't be superior to the $8+ "commercial" grade of (say) Krylon/Sherwin Williams, which I hear is essentially Duracoat (or maybe it was Guncoat, I'm not sure)?

Krylon and Rustoleum products are NOT the same as Duracoat. Not sure where you heard that but they are no where near the same.
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