Painting jobs.


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Old 03-27-2013, 06:25 PM   #1
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Default Painting jobs.

What's the best way and what paint should u use to paint synthetic rifle stocks.



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Old 03-27-2013, 09:56 PM   #2
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The stock needs treating first as plastic doesn't except paint very well. There's a gas method and a flame method. I wouldn't try either, so send it off if you want it done correctly...OR... If your like me and treat your firearms as tools, Some Dura-Coat or Rust-Oleum for plastic is fine. Roll around in the gravel and use it like it was built for. Scars, scratches, dents and dings are character



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Old 03-27-2013, 10:17 PM   #3
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Do not use the "Fusion" paint for plastic.
It looks good for a while, but will soon flake off.
On some plastics it does not "fuse" that well.

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Old 03-30-2013, 03:44 PM   #4
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Krylon plasti-coat or just plain Krylon will do a good job if you prep & apply correctly-

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Old 04-01-2013, 03:47 PM   #5
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Is the dura-coat paint easy to applicate and do u have to use an air brush to applicate it.

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Old 04-01-2013, 04:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zamzow View Post
Is the dura-coat paint easy to applicate and do u have to use an air brush to applicate it.
I would honestly recommend cerakote for your application. Duracoat isnt a bad product but the cerakote will bond much better.
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Old 04-01-2013, 10:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
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I would honestly recommend cerakote for your application. Duracoat isnt a bad product but the cerakote will bond much better.
Bonding has to do with the prep, not the name on the bottle.

The main difference between Cerekote and DuraCoat are the way they cure and the materials they consist of.

Saying one is better than the other is like saying a Glock is better than a 1911.

One cures via the air and one cures via an oven - both are extremely durable if prepped and cured properly. Cerekote's advantage is if you have ovens big enough, once they bake, they are done. DuraCoat's advantage is the finish has some elastic properties, unlike a ceramic based finish, which basically cracks if it "bends" even a little. Its all preference based.

The "this one is better" argument only exists because of people who like to latch onto one product and defend is mercilessly.

Obviously I use DuraCoat - and have for years - but I won't put down CereKote or GunKote - DuraCoat is just my preference. But they ALL suck if you don't prep correctly.
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuraCoater View Post

Bonding has to do with the prep, not the name on the bottle.

The main difference between Cerekote and DuraCoat are the way they cure and the materials they consist of.

Saying one is better than the other is like saying a Glock is better than a 1911.

One cures via the air and one cures via an oven - both are extremely durable if prepped and cured properly. Cerekote's advantage is if you have ovens big enough, once they bake, they are done. DuraCoat's advantage is the finish has some elastic properties, unless ceramic which basically cracks if it "bends" even a little. Its all preference based.

The "this one is better" argument only exists because of people who like to latch onto one product and defend is mercilessly.

Obviously I use DuraCoat - and have for years - but I won't put down CereKote or GunKote - DuraCoat is just my preference. But they ALL suck if you don't prep correctly.
You got me there. Thanks for the info.
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Old 04-03-2013, 03:22 PM   #9
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You can even get fantastic results out of products like Krylon if you prep properly. The problem with those products is simply that they are not formulated to stand up to a lot of cleaning solvents and so forth that are often used on firearms.

Hell, Ive used my fair share of Rustoleum Hi Temp Grill paint on stuff. haha

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Old 04-08-2013, 06:55 PM   #10
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4 years ago I painted this old model 70, twice. The lesson I learned from the first very unsuccessful paint job ( which started peeling off immediately upon drying) was that as soon as you think you have done a good job of cleaning it, clean it again. After giving it a good scratching up with some 500 grit paper I soaked and wiped and soaked and wiped with acetone. You can't clean it too much. Now, 4 years of dragging it through the woods, mountains and snow the scope is the only thing I've ever had to touch up, and only because I shied away from scuffing it before painting.

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