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Old 01-13-2013, 12:42 PM   #21
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I stripped my barrel and I think I'm just going to buy the BC cold blueing. Not the kit. I know I need degreeser and cotton swabs but what else do I need and what is the process of apllying it?

Attachment 79343
Directions on bottle work well-
I keep a box of non powdered surgical gloves for things like that-
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:21 PM   #22
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Man I'd DuraCoat that bad cat.It's an easy, inexpensive way to gussy up a gun. I have done several cold blue jobs on some guns here and for the most part it worked pretty well. I just see the DuraCoast thing a little more permanent a solution.

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Old 01-15-2013, 10:58 AM   #23
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For what it's worth, here's my .02 on this... Before retiring, I restored firearms as a hobby more than for a source of income. Now that I'm retired, I restore firearms to suppliment my retirement income. I've used cold blueing on more than one firearm and I would place any of my clients guns up to the scrutiny of a "gun pro" to prove they could tell whether it was hot blued or cold blued. In any project such as refinishing, prep is the most important. My drug of choice for cold blue happens to be Oxpho-Blue from Brownell's... I've used Birchwood Casey products but Brownells formula seems to give me the best consistant result. After applying several coats of cold blue (when I've completed the reblue), I finish off by soaking the parts in oil for at least 24 hours. What this does is set the blueing and also has the added benefit of deepening the blued finish color. I have several long guns in my safes that were done this way and have shown no signs of fading and these were done many years ago.

C3 made a good point earlier when he mentioned heating the metal before applying the cold blue solution... Even though it's not required, heating will help by opening the pores (so to speak) allowing the solution to get deeper into the metal. It works and all it takes is a hair dryer. Cold blue is nothing more than a poor mans way to refinish the metal. Hot bluing and cold blueing are both a chemical etching of the steel. Cold blue is simply more safe and less caustic (to a degree)...

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Old 01-15-2013, 11:06 AM   #24
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I guess I must be that "always someone." So what is a "gun pro?" A gunsmith, a medal winning target shooter, a gun store salesman? Maybe it is just someone who has been around guns all his life and has been shooting and reloading for around 50 years or so? If the later is so, then I qualify. I have not found some "magic formula." I only followed the directions. BTW, my local "gun pro," an experienced gunsmith, told me about really oiling the the project. Granted it is not a $200 professional hot tank bluing job, but it ain't bad. In fact, I was a little skeptical about using the cold blue at first, but now I am glad I used it. Spending $8.00 instead of $200 or more to blue the barrel of a $400 rifle makes a lot of sense to me. I will just be sure no "gun pros" see it. BTW, the guns have no smell at all other than a gun oil smell.
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I must be as well cottontop, I have cold blued many old ( junkers) as some would call them with great results but then again I can read directions on the bottle, an I also cleaned an polished the hell out of it before the ( crappy cold blue ) was applied. One must first understand that the prep must be done good to get good results.
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:10 AM   #25
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I stripped my barrel and I think I'm just going to buy the BC cold blueing. Not the kit. I know I need degreeser and cotton swabs but what else do I need and what is the process of apllying it?
Surgeons gloves the latex type, lots of cotton balls, 0000 steel wool to polish lightly between coats to even the blue, an solvent to clean it before u start any blueing an clean it untill it is clean an do it again. Then start blueing it just go slow an make long passes not short ones to keep it uniform. It WILL LOOK GOOD IF YOU TAKE YOUR TIME AN DID A GOOD PREP JOB.
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:46 PM   #26
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Heating the metal does not "open the pores." Heating simply makes the cold blue chemical reaction (copper sulphate plating) happen faster.
If you guys really want to blue guns, try rust bluing. It takes more time, but it can be done at home and is much more durable. Plus it gives a very nice blued finish. Rust bluing was done before the advent of hot salts bluing. It's the finish used on some of the finest guns.

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Old 01-16-2013, 01:43 AM   #27
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Heating the metal does not "open the pores." Heating simply makes the cold blue chemical reaction (copper sulphate plating) happen faster.
If you guys really want to blue guns, try rust bluing. It takes more time, but it can be done at home and is much more durable. Plus it gives a very nice blued finish. Rust bluing was done before the advent of hot salts bluing. It's the finish used on some of the finest guns.
Yes, some of the finest blued finishes I have ever seen were highly polished rust blued finishes. Hot salts are 100% faster thats why smiths use it. But a good prep on a rust blue ohhhh its perty.
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Old 01-16-2013, 11:50 AM   #28
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Yes, some of the finest blued finishes I have ever seen were highly polished rust blued finishes. Hot salts are 100% faster thats why smiths use it. But a good prep on a rust blue ohhhh its perty.
I agree-
I honestly think the name keeps many from even concidering it
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Old 01-16-2013, 01:46 PM   #29
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Perma Blue seems to work ok for me. It's ALL about the prep!

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Old 01-16-2013, 02:29 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDeShivs View Post
Heating the metal does not "open the pores." Heating simply makes the cold blue chemical reaction (copper sulphate plating) happen faster.
If you guys really want to blue guns, try rust bluing. It takes more time, but it can be done at home and is much more durable. Plus it gives a very nice blued finish. Rust bluing was done before the advent of hot salts bluing. It's the finish used on some of the finest guns.
Sorry but I must disagree with you. Heating the metal causes it to expand.. Expantion is a direct result of the molecular (spelling I know) bonding properties of the metal to "open" up. If you read my post I made the comment: "so to speak" take that for what it means. The reason folks heat metal parts to break them lose, for instance, is so that after expanding when hot, the metal contracts as it cools making it possible to break lose the stuck parts i.e. stubburn bolts and such..

I do agree that rust blueing is the best finish you can get.. That's how they did it in the past and it's still the best today. It takes a lot of patience but the end result will last a life time. Thing to remeber is that the "blue/black" finish is actually the protective oxidized finish of the steel itself. Left unprotected by not keepinfg oil on it, will still result in further oxidizing of the metal and eventual rust bucket status..
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