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-   -   Water (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/water-52637/)

tenntyrant 11-28-2011 01:16 PM

Water
 
How long does bottled water last and would that be a good way to stock up on it?

trip286 11-28-2011 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tenntyrant
How long does bottled water last and would that be a good way to stock up on it?

The regular store bought bottled water can last a while with the original seal and out of direct sunlight, and in a cool, dry, dark place. I think if you buy it by the gallon though that it's cheaper.

Water will be one of the first consumables to be completely used up, so a good purification system is also a good investment. A hand operated filter pump and a bunch of chem purifiers will keep you hydrated, but will become bothersome after a while (but what's more bothersome, pumping a filter or dying?)

Some here are working on home filtration systems that can pretty much run themselves.

My family is set up with a distillation rig, but I've got hand pumps and chems in BOG's and the vehicles. No stockpile of water at all here. I don't recommend against it, it's just a personal choice. We do keep enough water on hand for about a day though.

Jimmy 11-28-2011 02:02 PM

Water is my #1 prep item. Between filters, bottled, cistern, community water, and a well, I've done my best to be ready in that respect.

You can go two weeks without food. 3 days MAX without water. Less under bad conditions.

Jimmy

Jeepergeo 11-28-2011 06:07 PM

If you buy commercially produced (in the U.S. A) bottled water in containers sealed by the manufacturer, and store the water in a dark, relatively cool environment, the water IMO is definitely good for a year and probably much longer. For improved taste, you might want to rotate your supply so nothing is over a year or two years old.

The U.S. FDA (see link below) suggests that bottled water has an "indefinite safety shelf life".

It's a good idea to have some backup water purification supplies to help extend your stored stash. A good backpacking type filter and a gallon of bleach and you can produce more potable water once your stored bottled water runs out. The shelf life on the bleach is under a year, so that needs to be changed out more often.

You can buy a MiOx system and produce your own bleach from table salt and an electrical current. Small systems to produce MiOx (mixed oxidant) are available for about $100.

http://cascadedesigns.com/images/pro...m/msr_miox.jpg

February/March 2002 Ask the Regulators -- Bottled Water Regulation and the FDA

What is the shelf life for bottled water?
"Bottled water is considered to have an indefinite safety shelf life if it is produced in accordance with CGMP and quality standard regulations and is stored in an unopened, properly sealed container. Therefore, FDA does not require an expiration date for bottled water. However, long-term storage of bottled water may result in aesthetic defects, such as off-odor and taste. Bottlers may voluntarily put expiration dates on their labels."

bkt 11-28-2011 07:21 PM

I have several tens of gallons stored and I do NOT rotate it out religiously. If I had concerns about it, I'd run it through the Berkey first. Water tends to keep pretty much indefinitely. It can get stale but pouring it from one container to another a few times to re-oxygenate it works wonders for taste.

If at all possible, get access to a natural water source so you don't have to rely on whatever you keep stored.

purehavoc 11-28-2011 08:00 PM

This is what I have and best of all its made right here in the good ol USA , Mine a older model "water works" and all clear blue colored but I have had it 11 yrs and never used it , its still in the original bag in my BOB



•Ceramic/carbon Marathon™ EX element effectively removes bacteria and protozoa including giardia and cryptosporidia
•Also removes unpleasant tastes and odors caused by organic compounds, such as iodine, chlorine and pesticides
•Filter can be cleaned over and over for maximum field life with no tools required
•AirSpring Accumulator™ increases filtration speed up to 1 liter per min.
•Bottom screws onto an MSR Dromedary® Bag or Nalgene® water bottle for easy operation (both sold separately)
•Easy disassembly lets you troubleshoot and maintain the MSR MiniWorks EX filter in the field
Weight reported dry, without accessories.
Please note: MSR products can only be shipped to U.S. addresses.

Made in USA.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v5.../miniworks.jpg

orangello 11-28-2011 08:09 PM

After that katrina situation, even my "people actually buy water in bottles?" parents (in their 70's) keep a few of the 3 gallon or 5 gallon jugs of water in the garage for temporary outages and some of those iodine pills to boot. My personal stash is not so robust but does include some water.

purehavoc 11-28-2011 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeepergeo (Post 638212)
If you buy commercially produced (in the U.S. A) bottled water in containers sealed by the manufacturer, and store the water in a dark, relatively cool environment, the water IMO is definitely good for a year and probably much longer. For improved taste, you might want to rotate your supply so nothing is over a year or two years old.

The U.S. FDA (see link below) suggests that bottled water has an "indefinite safety shelf life".

It's a good idea to have some backup water purification supplies to help extend your stored stash. A good backpacking type filter and a gallon of bleach and you can produce more potable water once your stored bottled water runs out. The shelf life on the bleach is under a year, so that needs to be changed out more often.

You can buy a MiOx system and produce your own bleach from table salt and an electrical current. Small systems to produce MiOx (mixed oxidant) are available for about $100.

http://cascadedesigns.com/images/pro...m/msr_miox.jpg

February/March 2002 Ask the Regulators -- Bottled Water Regulation and the FDA

What is the shelf life for bottled water?
"Bottled water is considered to have an indefinite safety shelf life if it is produced in accordance with CGMP and quality standard regulations and is stored in an unopened, properly sealed container. Therefore, FDA does not require an expiration date for bottled water. However, long-term storage of bottled water may result in aesthetic defects, such as off-odor and taste. Bottlers may voluntarily put expiration dates on their labels."



That looks like a pretty neat little filter but what happens when you run outta batteries or salt ? I think I will stick with the human powered hand pump :D

Jimmy 11-28-2011 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by orangello (Post 638311)
After that katrina situation, even my "people actually buy water in bottles?" parents (in their 70's) keep a few of the 3 gallon or 5 gallon jugs of water in the garage for temporary outages and some of those iodine pills to boot. My personal stash is not so robust but does include some water.

After Katrina is when I got real serious about water. Because there was none after the storm. That won't happen again...;)

Jimmy

RairWeatherSmok 11-28-2011 11:18 PM

I had 5 - 1 gallon jugs of water stored in my closet. All leaked out after 3 or 4 years. Just empty bottles and water damage :(


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