Storm shelter/bunker - Page 2
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Discussion Forums > Survival & Sustenance Living Forum > Storm shelter/bunker

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-24-2013, 01:59 AM   #11
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hiwall's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleator,AZ
Posts: 3,386
Liked 763 Times on 487 Posts
Likes Given: 239

Default

Like these. already designed. already made.

box-culvert0001.jpg   culvert2.jpg   main-boxculvert.jpg  
__________________

Just walking on the edge of of my grave.

hiwall is offline  
dango Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2013, 03:34 AM   #12
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,174
Liked 3455 Times on 1933 Posts
Likes Given: 19279

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
Unless you have had experience in designing and building things from concrete- don't. No, really- don't.

First, if this is below grade, you will need a means of controlling ground water drainage- and a LOT of dirt to move (3x3x3 of soil is about 3000 lbs). You will need to keep your excavation from collapsing while working inside it (sloping or benching the earthen sides)

Concrete comes in different strength mixes- the 3000 lb concrete that works good for sidewalks will not cut it. You will need steel rebar for reinforcement. Design will need to support weight of concrete + weight of soil over it. Forms must be substantial and supported, or you WILL blow out a form. Concrete is HEAVY- and wet concrete is caustic- will eat the skin off you.

There ARE prefab concrete and/or metal structures. If you can lay block you may be able to build your own structure, but again, you will need a design (and possibly building plans)


PS- Gunite maxes at around 4,000 PSI compressive strength- usually a lot lower. Concrete can run up to 10,000, and work with some specialty stuff even higher, but $$$

Oh- burying a shipping container- walls of container have no support against a load applied at a right angle to the sides. Walls will bow in under pressure, and then fail. Walls would need design to resist that load.
I'm no engineer but the beauty of a SPHERE or HEMISPHERE with GUNITE ,
no form is necessary , but attention to reinforcement steel and something to shoot against is critical , but no load-bearing form is needed.!

It would take an engineer or architect with vision and understanding of basic physics and the advantages of "SHOOTING vs FORMING"..plus ventilation , strength to weight ratios , drainage,etc. !
Just something to look at is all ?
My experience with "Gunite" is limited , but I have demo-ed concrete and old gunite. From my perspective , trying to tear this crap out, GUNITE is more Polish than concrete.! 16 lbs. , 30 lbs. and 90 lbs. jack hammers and life was never fun when GUNITE was used.
__________________
dango is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2013, 05:52 PM   #13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dragunovsks's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: West of Louisville KY,Indiana
Posts: 2,310
Liked 201 Times on 138 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gm49007
Is pouring concrete cheaper than purchasing a container
A container will run you around 2 to 3k for a 40 footer but as mentioned by others itll have to be heavily reinforced as only the corners are designed to carry the load. Thats why when stacked on a ship or container yard they only stack same length containers. If they stacked 20' containers on a 40 footer the weight of the smaller ones would crush or at least damage the lower units. While they are steel they are only slightly thicker than the body on your car or truck. We use containers welded to a container chassis with the roof removed to haul scrap iron and crushed cars and after being stuffed with sheet iron with a grapple claw for a couple years they bow outward pretty severly. So piling tons upon tons of dirt across the roof of a container will cause problems unless its heavily reinforced. Also unless your live in the desert itll eventuallt rust out and collapse anyways.

Id go with concrete with rebar in it, but keep in mind concrete alone will not keep water out. You'd have to put in a sump pump or something to keep the bunker dry the same way residental basements have a sump pump. If it was me id go with a catch basin, design it so that when the water in the catch basin rises to lets say 2" itll spill over into a buried drain pipe, down a slope and out into the outside world down the hill from your bunker. That idea uses no electricity so you wont have to worry about keeping power to your bunker when not using it.
__________________

Century Arms AR-15A2, 5.56
1946 Mosin-Nagant M44, 7.62x54R
1978 YUGO SKS, 7.62x39
NEF Protector Pump, 12 gauge
Savage Model 64, .22LR
NEF Pardner Tracker II, 12 gauge
Rock Island Armory 1911A1, .45 ACP
Remington 870 'Express Magnum' 12 gauge
Bersa Thunder .380

dragunovsks is offline  
dango Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2013, 10:18 PM   #14
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
locutus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 10,171
Liked 6528 Times on 3641 Posts
Likes Given: 6162

Default

Consider a railroad steel container or old boxcar above ground, with berms around it.

locutus is offline  
dango Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2013, 06:59 AM   #15
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,174
Liked 3455 Times on 1933 Posts
Likes Given: 19279

Default

In concrete and gunite , a "Latex" additive can be added to the mix and thus ,water proof..! Then is just simple cracks maintenance..! Or "ELASTO MERIC"

__________________
dango is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2013, 07:57 AM   #16
Lifetime Supporting Member
FTF_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 14,522
Liked 8810 Times on 5094 Posts
Likes Given: 11482

Default

Shipping containers are a bad idea. It doesn't take much dirt to collapse them, and as mentioned they will fail due to rust eventually, depending on your climate. For a small underground shelter you can get some of those poly septic tanks (I would steer away from the used market) as they are engineered to be buried and they are water tight. Keep in mind that you absolutely must have good ventilation and provisions for sanitation as well. These septic tanks only go up to about 1500 gallons in size which is pretty small. I have heard of people who plan on building underground gun vaults using this idea. Seems like it would work well to me.

Right up the road there are a couple of wineries that have built their own wine caves. Its big business up in Napa and Sonoma. They get heavy mining equipment in and excavate the tunnels, then they install the rebar framework up against the walls and ceiling of the tunnel and gunite it. I toured one of them during construction, the largest gallery is 30 feet wide by 25 feet high. Total footprint is 13,000 square feet. This is one of the smaller wine caves I have seen. http://nordbywinecaves.com/Gallery.htm?who=Rhys%20Vineyards&type=Complete

__________________

Shoot me an email at vikingdad995@gmail.com

Quote:
"Among the many misdeeds of British rule in India, history will look upon the Act depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest."
- Mohandas Gandhi, an Autobiography, page 446.
Vikingdad is offline  
dango Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Wilderness Shelter? TLuker Survival & Sustenance Living Forum 2 11-13-2012 04:23 AM
Building a fallout shelter BullseyePrecision Survival & Sustenance Living Forum 13 01-13-2012 08:53 PM
Whats your e-shelter? Gus556 Survival & Sustenance Living Forum 9 07-20-2011 05:32 PM
U.S.G.I Shelter Half $24.99 Cope's Distributing Sponsor Display 0 07-24-2009 03:25 PM