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Old 04-14-2013, 04:20 PM   #31
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You are far more likely to be struck by lightning than a nuclear weapon.
Thanks for stating the obvious from 1945 till yesterday. Now let's look ahead and prepare as we each see fit going forward...
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Old 04-14-2013, 11:10 PM   #32
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You are far more likely to be struck by lightning than a nuclear weapon.
That's not the point...
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Old 04-15-2013, 04:45 AM   #33
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A friend of mine always said, "when it happens, do yourself a favor and run towards the light"

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Old 04-18-2013, 11:27 PM   #34
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That's not the point...

Really?? Then what is the point?
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:07 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
Or as we used to say-

"Nuke 'em 'til they glow-

So you shoot 'em in the dark!"


I always heard it as

"Nuke 'em till they glow

and then use their butts for runway lights!"
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:10 AM   #36
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Nuke survival 101

There are two main categories
1. Being in the damage radius of a nuclear weapon when it detonates
2. Being in the area that will be contaminated with radioactive fallout.

For 1. there are 2 defenses- A. Put 7,000 ft of granite rock above your head (see Cheyenne Mountain Colorado) OR-B. Be somewhere else when it happens. The damage done by a nuke consists mainly of the same things associated with conventional explosives- blast and heat. They are almost immediate (well, so fast you don't really have time to ponder it). Direct immediate nuclear radiation in excess of 600 rads- no real treatment possible- it is a done deal.

Most of the concern is with the second hazard. Soil and debris that is sucked thru the fireball becomes radioactive. It is carried downwind, and falls back to the earth as dust. It IS radioactive- but unlike plutonium or uranium that stays hot for hundreds of thousands of years, it decays a lot in about 14 days.

You mission is to keep the dust away from you, and refrain from breathing it for about 2 weeks (or less, depending on how much is out there- but we will call it 2 weeks)

You CAN try shielding (dense materials- Concrete, lead, brick, books, dirt, water) but distance is also in your favor- all radiation works on an inverse square- 4 times as far is 1/16th the dose, etc. So a clean space with air between you and fallout is a good start.

Not breathing fine dust- and keeping it away from you- Requires a space that can be pressurized with CLEAN air- pushes out, keeps dust from coming in. Called positive pressure. There are commercial filters and blowers- but you can also build a pretty decent version using furnace filters and rolls of toilet paper. You can also build a simple bellows type air pump from heavy cardboard and good tape. Idea being to pull air thru filter into your place of sanctuary, letting excess push out.

Inside, you will need food, water, and provisions for sanitation for 2 weeks. If you MUST go outside for any reason, time is your enemy. Keep it short. A high efficiency respirator or military protective mask can keep dust out of your lungs, a poncho can help keep it off you, but you need to decontaminate before going back into sanctuary.

You can score a surplus radiation meter for a few bucks on E-bay. or make your own foil electroscope type. There are also meds to help prevent your body from taking in radioactive iodine, (potassium iodide) since your body concentrates iodine in one spot- the thyroid.

There is a LOT of reading available on line and in print. Look for a paperback copy of Pulling Through by Dean Ing. Read it before you need it.

Now, some of you right now are thinking "Boy, old C3 sure is paranoid!" Well, of COURSE I am! Graduated from US Army NBC school in 1970, live in a target rich environment, and have 2 nuke power plants about 20 miles away.
I remember hearing all this in Damage Control school at the Norfolk Naval Station just before I deployed to the USS Holland AS-32 in 1979
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:03 AM   #37
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The best thing you can do to avoid potential problems with nuclear radiation are as follows:

1. Not be in the blast radius of the UCR

2. Leave the area as fast as possible

3. Do not inhale or ingest anything that was potentially irradiated in the blast or covered with particulate matter that was disturbed by the blast (fallout).

Understand that your skin is one of the most perfect barrier membranes ever devised. You can wash irradiated material off your skin and be relatively unaffected, assuming no inhalation or ingestion of irradiated material and decontamination as soon as feasible.

If you're curious, the military generally uses HTH for decon. You don't need HTH, you can mix bleach with water.

There are a lot of things that will affect the dose of radiation you receive and concentration, length of exposure, and type of exposure all come into play.

The Alpha particles will be blocked by your skin.

The Beta particles will be blocked by common clothing.

The gamma rays won't be blocked by anything except very dense materials like granite, ceramics, and lead for example. Probably best to let mother earth do what it does best and take that hit for you.

The neutron radiation will, like gamma rays, require a substantial quantity of very solid material between you and the emission source.

If you are not in the blast radius and were smart enough to get down, your exposure to the gamma rays and neutron particles will likely be brief and slight. These are the most energetic and difficult to stop types of radiation which will do the most damage if no effective barrier is present. That said, the alpha and beta particles pose a risk for a much longer period of time, comparatively speaking. The gamma burst from a UCR is measured in microseconds, I think. Like c3shooter said, the fallout could take hours to days (or longer if the yield of the device is high enough to put matter into the jet stream).

The things I've learned about radiation have mostly been from the Navy, from doctors, and from my Uncle (a mathematician/statistician who did some design work on the neutron bomb).

If you aren't in the blast zone and can exit the fallout zone upwind as fast as possible and simply cover your face/mouth/ears/eyes to inhibit inhalation or ingestion of irradiated material, you should live. Gas masks and CPO suits are mostly a waste of time and money unless you have detection equipment, can don the PPE prior to the UCR, or must spend more time in the irradiated area than is necessary to leave it (generally this would mean you were part of a government team with the training, equipment, and procedures to work in an irradiated environment and wouldn't be hear asking questions about it).

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