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Old 07-17-2010, 10:31 PM   #21
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Ones definition of off the grid. When you start talking of solar power, generators, and any other luxury items in my mind is not going back to the basics. a good example is knowing what to do with all that meat you kill, and the fish you catch. Canning fruits and vegatables. How to make your own soap, charcoal, gun powder. The list is endless. After watching the guy up in Alaska, he himself said he couldn't do it alone. My wife is one that can make it in the wilderness. I'll kill what ever and she'll skin it and cook it. She was brought up old school. I need advice on how to make a smoker on a tight budget. Keep your head down and your powder dry!!!!!
I think living "off the grid" is often confused with reverting back to a lifestyle in which none of the conveniences of today existed. Going off the grid, to me, simply means not depending on public utilities for everyday life. Certainly some things would be purchased from "on the grid" sources, or else we are talking about tanning our own hides and weaving our own cloth for clothing, etc. Living "off the grid" is not 100% self-sufficiency to be sure, but it would be preferable to having no options other than waiting on the local power company to come back on line in the event of a SHTF situation.

Solar and wind power would certainly be excellent options for the long term, but a generator powered by either diesel or natural gas would be the best short-term solution, IMO.
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Old 07-17-2010, 11:41 PM   #22
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I think living "off the grid" is often confused with reverting back to a lifestyle in which none of the conveniences of today existed. Going off the grid, to me, simply means not depending on public utilities for everyday life. Certainly some things would be purchased from "on the grid" sources, or else we are talking about tanning our own hides and weaving our own cloth for clothing, etc. Living "off the grid" is not 100% self-sufficiency to be sure, but it would be preferable to having no options other than waiting on the local power company to come back on line in the event of a SHTF situation.

Solar and wind power would certainly be excellent options for the long term, but a generator powered by either diesel or natural gas would be the best short-term solution, IMO.
That's why, even when I moved back to suburbia I brought my solar panels along. I had a fireplace, a couple cords of wood, and the solar panels and I was in business when the power failed. Too many folks have no backup, and when the grid fails they have nothing. At least I had lights and some heat. I
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Old 07-18-2010, 12:37 AM   #23
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A poly tunnel may be a good idea to assist with year round veg.
I had not thought of that. In fact I was wondering "what am I going to do when its too cold for veggies". Already started researching these. Thanks!

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Ones definition of off the grid. When you start talking of solar power, generators, and any other luxury items in my mind is not going back to the basics.
Mostly I mean that I don't want to live off of paid utilities. I'd like any electricity I need to be generated by nature or other "free" means (solar, wind, water, etc). I'll need to dig a well or tap into some other water source, I'd like to not have AC or heat (other than a wood stove), I never watch TV anyhow, and could probably live without internet for stretches of time between visits to 'society' where I could hop on a free hotspot while picking up the various things that I need and cant produce myself.

Canning veggies and fruit will be a part of my lifestyle, as will preserving meats. But, I'll need various things from the grid: reloading supplies, salt, rice, clothing, replacement tools, building materials, etc.

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From my experience propane is the best for a fridge. The little one's that are in RV's work just fine. As for refrigeration in a melt down situation, you just need to do what they did way back when. A root cellar built into the side of a small hill. You cut your ice in the winter and put it in the root cellar, cover it with sawdust and you should have a natural fridge for quite some time, way into the summer I think.
The ice is a good idea, though that will be determined on the climate in where I can buy some land. I have definite plans to build a cellar/bunker for food storage and protection against nature (if I happen to be in a nasty storm or my domicile is damaged by some other force)
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Old 07-18-2010, 03:51 PM   #24
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I had not thought of that. In fact I was wondering "what am I going to do when its too cold for veggies". Already started researching these. Thanks!



Mostly I mean that I don't want to live off of paid utilities. I'd like any electricity I need to be generated by nature or other "free" means (solar, wind, water, etc). I'll need to dig a well or tap into some other water source, I'd like to not have AC or heat (other than a wood stove), I never watch TV anyhow, and could probably live without internet for stretches of time between visits to 'society' where I could hop on a free hotspot while picking up the various things that I need and cant produce myself.

Canning veggies and fruit will be a part of my lifestyle, as will preserving meats. But, I'll need various things from the grid: reloading supplies, salt, rice, clothing, replacement tools, building materials, etc.



The ice is a good idea, though that will be determined on the climate in where I can buy some land. I have definite plans to build a cellar/bunker for food storage and protection against nature (if I happen to be in a nasty storm or my domicile is damaged by some other force)
Have you thought about any places to move yet? If you are looking to stay in the midwest, I got some relatives in the hills of Northeast Iowa, around Wadena. Also, my property is in Notheast Vermont, and the prices are still very reasonable. The only problem is work. You can't make a whole lot of money there, but it would be a great place to hunker down.
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Old 07-18-2010, 03:59 PM   #25
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Have you thought about any places to move yet? If you are looking to stay in the midwest, I got some relatives in the hills of Northeast Iowa, around Wadena. Also, my property is in Notheast Vermont, and the prices are still very reasonable. The only problem is work. You can't make a whole lot of money there, but it would be a great place to hunker down.
I've been researching some areas. I think the midwest would likely be where I'll go (or stay, as it is). One thing is for sure, I'm getting the hell out of Illinois as soon as I can. Unfortunately, as with most of us here, money is tighter than prom night. And I will likely build this in stages.

First will be the purchase of land. Then I'll likely build some kind of cabin as a place for hunting and camping. Then the root cellar, solar, and wind power. Then I'll find the right time to head to the hills.
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Old 07-18-2010, 05:08 PM   #26
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I've been researching some areas. I think the midwest would likely be where I'll go (or stay, as it is). One thing is for sure, I'm getting the hell out of Illinois as soon as I can. Unfortunately, as with most of us here, money is tighter than prom night. And I will likely build this in stages.

First will be the purchase of land. Then I'll likely build some kind of cabin as a place for hunting and camping. Then the root cellar, solar, and wind power. Then I'll find the right time to head to the hills.
Yep, that's what I did. Bought the property in 1981 and it has been fully paid for for quite some time. I want to sell my house here in Pa, buy an RV and can then bounce around between there and the midwest. I've got 6 more years to run the road as a long haul truck driver and then it will be time to take a break. Good luck to you.
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