Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   Survival & Sustenance Living Forum (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/)
-   -   Living off the grid (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/living-off-grid-29102/)

falseharmonix 07-08-2010 03:38 AM

Living off the grid
 
After watching the video about the couple living off the grid in Alaska, I've been interested in just what it would take to make something like that happen. I've been searching for a large enough plot of land to support hunting, fishing, trapping, and farming for a single family. This is more than just a whim, as I've often dreamed of sustaining my own survival.....

Aside from the obvious sustained living essentials (hunting, fishing, trapping, gardening/farming, food storage, shelter, fire, water, protection, etc), how do I go about making something like this a possibility?

canebrake 07-08-2010 04:29 AM

Big step!!!!!

No more WWB ammo.

http://i695.photobucket.com/albums/v...ons/hippie.gif

c3shooter 07-08-2010 11:23 AM

Step 1. Read. A lot. I learn better from the mistakes of OTHERS (and it is less painful.

Step 2. Define "Off the grid". It usually means being self sufficient for utilities- not being connected to the national power grid. However, to some folks, it means total self sufficiency. Here's a hint- that is really not going to happen for extended periods. I am a pretty fair carpenter- hell, I can make my own nails, or pegged beam construction if I need to- but I do not have a source of coal, limestone, and iron ore on my property, and I am not going to be making steel for a chisel.

Step 3- Figure out where you want to get to- and be willing to modify your goals as you go. "I want my whole house powered by a wind generator." OK- but the house you have in mind has a 3 ton heat pump, and the winds in your area are not going to deliver that much power- nor run your electric water heater, electric range, clothes dryer, etc. Soooooooo- we opt for a clothes line, skip the AC, go for the wood stove, and actually DO have enough home grown electricity for CFLs, a stereo, and an LCD TV.

Step 4. Take small bites at first. I have some country boys that grew up splitting firewood, canning green beans, and slaughtering a pig to make sausage- and they could go back to that tomorrow and not miss a beat. But is all that is new to you, take it a step at a time. Systemic shock, ya know.

Step 5. Mine knowledge. Not the possessive mine, but the verb. The old guy down the road that DOES still raise his own livestock, and processes the meat- may need a hand at butchering time. Tell him you want to learn how- can you come help? Don't know how to use a gin pole (no connection to alcohol) to raise a wind generator tower? Find someone that is doing it, and volunteer your labor. Madly making notes to self all while. For about $39, you can buy a BUNCH of back issues of Mother Earth News from the 70s and 80s (check Ebay). Magazine of the "back to the earth" folks. Haunt used books shops for nuggets of knowledge. I just got a copy of The Homebuilt Wind-generated Electricity Handbook for $4.

Rick1967 07-08-2010 01:04 PM

I would be all for that type of thing. But, I would loose my wife and kids. They would never go for it. That's why I am a city dweller. Well small town anyway.

dunerunner 07-08-2010 04:05 PM

Look for property with a live stream that can be partially damed. Combine a small gasifier fueled generator, solar, wind and low head hydroelectric for power. Raise your oun chickens, beef and pork. Grow and can your own fruit and vegetables. Raise trout (if water in your pond is deep and cold enough) or catfish and crayfish in your partially damed stream (pond).

Build a methane generator and dump all sewage and animal waste in it. This will heat water (along with solar and electric), to heat your house and for domestic use. Get used to being cold and working hard, every day.

Find property that borders BLM or National Park land. That way you don't have to go the expense of having 1000 acres for access to wild game and timber, you just take a walk in the park!!

Good Luck!

falseharmonix 07-08-2010 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 311869)
Step 1. Read. A lot. I learn better from the mistakes of OTHERS (and it is less painful.

Step 2. Define "Off the grid". It usually means being self sufficient for utilities- not being connected to the national power grid. However, to some folks, it means total self sufficiency.....

I'd like to have zero electricity run to the living area. I'd likely invest in solar and wind for minimal things (and a gasoline powered generator for all of the other things from time to time). I'd like to have a well dug for my own water. Wood stove for heat, open the windows for "AC". However, I realize there are some things I cannot make...building materials, reloading supplies, gasoline, salt, sugar, flour, etc...these I will need to purchase. So, in all reality it wont be complete isolation, but as much as possible is my aim.

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 311869)
Step 3- Figure out where you want to get to- and be willing to modify your goals as you go. "I want my whole house powered by a wind generator." OK- but the house you have in mind has a 3 ton heat pump, and the winds in your area are not going to deliver that much power- nor run your electric water heater, electric range, clothes dryer, etc. Soooooooo- we opt for a clothes line, skip the AC, go for the wood stove, and actually DO have enough home grown electricity for CFLs, a stereo, and an LCD TV.

In all honesty, I'd like to have as few 'creature comforts' as possible. I never watch TV, and can always find free hotspots for internet in urban areas. I love to cook, and imagine I could make do without gas for a stove so long as there is wood to burn. However, long term food storage without a fridge would be something I have no experience in. Canning would be a necessity , and gardening, hunting, and fishing would be my main source of food.

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 311869)
Step 4. Take small bites at first. I have some country boys that grew up splitting firewood, canning green beans, and slaughtering a pig to make sausage- and they could go back to that tomorrow and not miss a beat. But is all that is new to you, take it a step at a time. Systemic shock, ya know.

I imagine it will take many years to gather the funds to buy the land, build the living area, all the equipment needed to be self-sufficient. What would likely be my scenario is I buy the property as a hunting/vacationing spot, and slowly turn it into a home I could one day live in (either total retreat from civilization, retirement, or SHTF bunker)

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 311869)
Step 5. Mine knowledge. Not the possessive mine, but the verb. The old guy down the road that DOES still raise his own livestock, and processes the meat- may need a hand at butchering time. Tell him you want to learn how- can you come help? Don't know how to use a gin pole (no connection to alcohol) to raise a wind generator tower? Find someone that is doing it, and volunteer your labor. Madly making notes to self all while. For about $39, you can buy a BUNCH of back issues of Mother Earth News from the 70s and 80s (check Ebay). Magazine of the "back to the earth" folks. Haunt used books shops for nuggets of knowledge. I just got a copy of The Homebuilt Wind-generated Electricity Handbook for $4.

Knowledge mining is something I've been doing for a while. A lot of it is survival based, but some is gardening and farming, some hunting, some field medicine, etc...

Thank you for your reply!

IDVague 07-08-2010 07:20 PM

I read an article about this in the late 1980's and it was fascinating at the time. I read and re-read it several times and it laid out the plans for self-sufficient living by owning a balance of crop land, grazing pastures, and woodlands. After committing most of it to memory, I began telling my father about it. I described how a small herd of livestock, some chickens, a milk cow, and some hogs would provide protein for a family of 6, a moderate sized garden would provide plenty of vegetables, and if there were mature fruit trees on the property that was an added bonus. A larger plot could be used to provide extra vegetables to sell or trade for other supplies, provided there were an adequate number of able bodies to maintain it. The woodlands would provide an additional supply of wild game to augment the protein supply and fresh water fish on the property would also be a plus.

I hadn't gotten past this point to explain about using wood as a heat source and how kerosene lanterns would provide lighting and an emergency generator could be kept around just in case when my dad stopped me and said, "You just described my life up until the age of 17." He then went on to tell me how much he didn't want any part of going back there. I certainly agree with that, but I also know that many of us who didn't have that early experience should make ourselves prepared in the event it becomes necessary. It concerns me that even my generation would be hard pressed to survive such an event, when our view of "olden days" is black & white TV with 3 channels and an antennae on the roof. The younger generation is almost assured to whither and die without an iPod and a cell phone. While preparation for the unthinkable is vital, I hope we have enough fight in us to keep it from happening.

willshoum 07-08-2010 07:38 PM

Sh$t from Shinoalo
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by falseharmonix (Post 311762)
After watching the video about the couple living off the grid in Alaska, I've been interested in just what it would take to make something like that happen. I've been searching for a large enough plot of land to support hunting, fishing, trapping, and farming for a single family. This is more than just a whim, as I've often dreamed of sustaining my own survival.....

Aside from the obvious sustained living essentials (hunting, fishing, trapping, gardening/farming, food storage, shelter, fire, water, protection, etc), how do I go about making something like this a possibility?

You my friend need to do a lot of homework. If you think for one moment that you can pull this off your a better man than me. Alaska is an unforgiveing land. Do your research and take it one step at a time. Remember there a no roads and help is miles away. Bears are allways a problem.:eek:

falseharmonix 07-08-2010 08:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by willshoum (Post 312025)
You my friend need to do a lot of homework. If you think for one moment that you can pull this off your a better man than me. Alaska is an unforgiveing land. Do your research and take it one step at a time. Remember there a no roads and help is miles away. Bears are allways a problem.:eek:

Well, I wasn't thinking Alaska per say. Just living off the grid somewhere in the US.

willshoum 07-08-2010 08:19 PM

Liven off the land
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by falseharmonix (Post 311762)
After watching the video about the couple living off the grid in Alaska, I've been interested in just what it would take to make something like that happen. I've been searching for a large enough plot of land to support hunting, fishing, trapping, and farming for a single family. This is more than just a whim, as I've often dreamed of sustaining my own survival.....

Aside from the obvious sustained living essentials (hunting, fishing, trapping, gardening/farming, food storage, shelter, fire, water, protection, etc), how do I go about making something like this a possibility?

Pick your sight carefully, You will and can do this if you do your home work. Look to the interior of the U> S> High ground is preferred. And change your eating habbits. Learn to sleep W/O ac. Pack your bags with antibiotics in case of injury. This list can go on an on. Remember to look in the pool before you jump. Keep in touch. Wills in da swamp in La.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:28 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.