Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Discussion Forums > Survival & Sustenance Living Forum > Heat without electric or gas

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-04-2012, 02:04 PM   #21
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 700
Liked 248 Times on 142 Posts
Likes Given: 163

Default

I grew up with wood heat. That's all we had. Went on many a trip to help pick wood up as a kid too. We live in the country on 31 acres and have access to allot of dead trees on the neighbors farm too so getting wood would not be a problem for a long time. A 50 gallon barrel of gas would last a long time for wood cutting if it were stable the whole time. I've got a good size garden tractor and a small trailer to haul wood with that I'd use. It would burn far less gas than my full size pickup.

We're thinking of one of these. It's a Heritage model from Hearthstone Stoves. Anyone have any experience with soapstone stoves? I plan to build a hearth from something like flagstones or natural rock to sit it on and put that same rock up the wall behind it for 4-5 ft. I'd also use a double wall insulated stainless stove pipe.


__________________

Last edited by Jim1611; 02-04-2012 at 02:14 PM.
Jim1611 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 04:59 PM   #22
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ellis36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Batesville,Mississippi
Posts: 803
Liked 629 Times on 290 Posts
Likes Given: 364

Default

That should work. Run your insulated pipe down as close to the top of the stove as you can. Paint it whatever color is appropriate. The insulated pipe comes in fixed lengths, so fill in the difference with a short piece of single wall pipe to the stove. Even though the insulated pipe interlocks with the ceiling fixture it's got some weight so it's good to have it resting on the stove. Then put one of those temperature sensors on the single wall pipe so you can monitor the fire in the stove from your chair. (The double-wall pipe just gets a little warm and will make your insurance man happy.) Then the rock wall will be mostly decorative. Nice looking installation.

__________________
ellis36 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 05:11 PM   #23
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9199 Times on 5056 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1611
I grew up with wood heat. That's all we had. Went on many a trip to help pick wood up as a kid too. We live in the country on 31 acres and have access to allot of dead trees on the neighbors farm too so getting wood would not be a problem for a long time. A 50 gallon barrel of gas would last a long time for wood cutting if it were stable the whole time. I've got a good size garden tractor and a small trailer to haul wood with that I'd use. It would burn far less gas than my full size pickup.

Anyone who lives on a decent piece of land and is thinking about cutting and hauling fire wood, should at least consider something like a shetland pony and little wagon. It's surprising how much those little boogers can pull, and they are lower maintenance than a small tractor, if, like anything else, they are taken care of properly to begin with.

I'm not knocking the garden tractor, and 31 acres is still small enough that you can carry the wood home by hand if needed. But a little shetland, compared to a full size horse, is like the comparison of your garden tractor to your full size truck.

Just something to think about. My family, at my planned bug out location, has several horses and a couple of donkeys, with work harnesses for all. We still use the tractor exclusively though. But we know we have real live horsepower if it's needed. It's not a bad investment, and the food animals are already designated.
__________________
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 05:52 PM   #24
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 700
Liked 248 Times on 142 Posts
Likes Given: 163

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trip286 View Post
Anyone who lives on a decent piece of land and is thinking about cutting and hauling fire wood, should at least consider something like a shetland pony and little wagon. It's surprising how much those little boogers can pull, and they are lower maintenance than a small tractor, if, like anything else, they are taken care of properly to begin with.

I'm not knocking the garden tractor, and 31 acres is still small enough that you can carry the wood home by hand if needed. But a little shetland, compared to a full size horse, is like the comparison of your garden tractor to your full size truck.

Just something to think about. My family, at my planned bug out location, has several horses and a couple of donkeys, with work harnesses for all. We still use the tractor exclusively though. But we know we have real live horsepower if it's needed. It's not a bad investment, and the food animals are already designated.
That's an excellent point. As of now I don't have a horse or poney but do have almost all of the place fenced for that purpose. Just keep them fed and who needs gasoline!
__________________
Jim1611 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 06:06 PM   #25
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9199 Times on 5056 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1611
That's an excellent point. As of now I don't have a horse or poney but do have almost all of the place fenced for that purpose. Just keep them fed and who needs gasoline!
Pretty much. There are guidelines published on how many animals to have per acre to keep the roughage from being overgrazed. Also guidelines on pasture rotation if your exceeding the animal per acre rules. It doesn't take nearly as much to keep animals fed as people think. Some supplemental grain and dry roughage (hay) would be necessary, but something like a shetland or a donkey wont come close to breaking the bank.
__________________
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 06:16 PM   #26
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jordan89's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Defiance,Ohio
Posts: 1,255
Liked 69 Times on 49 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trip286

Pretty much. There are guidelines published on how many animals to have per acre to keep the roughage from being overgrazed. Also guidelines on pasture rotation if your exceeding the animal per acre rules. It doesn't take nearly as much to keep animals fed as people think. Some supplemental grain and dry roughage (hay) would be necessary, but something like a shetland or a donkey wont come close to breaking the bank.
Do you have any reading material on the subject?
__________________

Everybody needs a little Devastation!

jordan89 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 06:31 PM   #27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9199 Times on 5056 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Not here. I'm not a horse owner, but my parents have it all in hardcopy in their library.

I believe they just googled something like "grazing recommendations" to find it. We've all been around horses all our lives anyway, so we already had pretty good ideas on how many animals were too much.

One quarter horse will keep at least two acres of land chewed down to the nub year round. They have seven horses and 2 donkeys, with about 20 acres worth of actual pasture land. Through rotation, grain, and hay, none of the pasture land or animals are suffering.

If a long term SHTF situation happens (like a governmental collapse) they plan on harvesting one horse immediately and preserving the meat as well as they can.

They are also shopping for solar panels and windmills right now, so heat (which is the original topic) may be a moot point. Hopefully. But even still, at least the freezer will still work, which means we won't have to expand that tiny little smokehouse.

__________________
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 10:29 PM   #28
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hiwall's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleator,AZ
Posts: 3,260
Liked 698 Times on 448 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

"Run your insulated pipe down as close to the top of the stove as you can."
I would run single wall pipe up to the ceiling and transition there to the insulated pipe. That is the way it is usually done, its cheaper and you get the heat off the single wall pipe into the room. Also if you let the donkey sleep in your house he will help keep it warm

__________________

Just walking on the edge of of my grave.

hiwall is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 04:57 AM   #29
Lifetime Supporting Member
FTF_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Vikingdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains,CA
Posts: 13,530
Liked 7834 Times on 4523 Posts
Likes Given: 10088

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellis36 View Post
That should work. Run your insulated pipe down as close to the top of the stove as you can. Paint it whatever color is appropriate. The insulated pipe comes in fixed lengths, so fill in the difference with a short piece of single wall pipe to the stove. Even though the insulated pipe interlocks with the ceiling fixture it's got some weight so it's good to have it resting on the stove. Then put one of those temperature sensors on the single wall pipe so you can monitor the fire in the stove from your chair. (The double-wall pipe just gets a little warm and will make your insurance man happy.) Then the rock wall will be mostly decorative. Nice looking installation.
Wrong and right. Use insulated double wall pipe to pass inspection, then replace it with single wall stovepipe inside the house. Single wall stovepipe will radiate more heat into the living area than insulated will. If you want to heat the neighborhood keep the insulated pipe.

I have heard about single-wall stovepipe that has a heat-sink attached.

Vermont Castings makes some incredibly efficient stoves.
__________________
Vikingdad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2012, 12:43 PM   #30
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 700
Liked 248 Times on 142 Posts
Likes Given: 163

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vikingdad View Post
Wrong and right. Use insulated double wall pipe to pass inspection, then replace it with single wall stovepipe inside the house. Single wall stovepipe will radiate more heat into the living area than insulated will. If you want to heat the neighborhood keep the insulated pipe.

I have heard about single-wall stovepipe that has a heat-sink attached.

Vermont Castings makes some incredibly efficient stoves.
We've also been looking at the Vermont Casting stoves. They are good ones without a doubt.
__________________
Jim1611 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
electric boat motors shooter57 The Club House 7 08-04-2011 12:59 AM
Electric Cars - Green? planenut Legal and Activism 35 10-21-2010 01:41 AM
$ 640 electric bill! hillbilly68 The Club House 14 01-30-2010 01:22 PM
Electric Trap Thrower notdku General Shotgun Discussion 3 06-03-2007 03:55 PM