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Old 08-11-2013, 05:39 PM   #41
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I noticed that several people chimed in about how goats ARE hard to care for, and die easily, etc. Anybody care to elaborate?
I'd like to hear their experience also. Mine are easy.

And they will go on a walk with me and the dogs. Hmmmm...
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Old 08-11-2013, 05:43 PM   #42
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And they will go on a walk with me and the dogs. Hmmmm...
LOL, that's funny. The farmer I work for says they are very social, too. He seems to like his goats more than most people.
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Old 08-11-2013, 05:46 PM   #43
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They are naturally herd animals, so they will not do well by themselves. The more there are the better off they are. Also, the more troublesome ones might be the pure breeds? I know my purebred spaniel is more trouble than all of the mutts I have had combined.
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Old 08-12-2013, 04:44 PM   #44
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They are naturally herd animals, so they will not do well by themselves. The more there are the better off they are. Also, the more troublesome ones might be the pure breeds? I know my purebred spaniel is more trouble than all of the mutts I have had combined.
I only had 1 goat and she was no problem at all, could be the exception to the rule. She was not a purebred and that could of been the reason.
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Old 08-12-2013, 05:38 PM   #45
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Still no progress with the wife. At this point, all the brambles are going to die off for the year anyway. May as well wait till next spring.....
I noticed that several people chimed in about how goats ARE hard to care for, and die easily, etc. Anybody care to elaborate?
Die easily? My neighbor's had a bullet wound (stray shot) and a couple of cuts that required stitches from falling through brush! You couldn't kill that goat if you wanted to! He wasn't a purebred or papered, just a Heinz 57 goat.

Goats are like any other animal: they are social and need interaction. They prefer to be in a herd, but any amount more than one will allow them to entertain each other. With a single goat, it'll want to interact with the humans like a pet.

A viable male is the hardest to handle. They are more aggressive than any other and will "mark" (pee on) everything in sight when he wants to mate. It's best to own fixed males or females and then just pay to have the females bred every year to a viable male owned by someone else. Otherwise, they don't need anything but food and water. If you have long-haired breeds, there is more to do, as they will need shaving or brushing out every Spring.

If this is a serious consideration for you, I would contact a goat breeder near you. He can tell you what breeds do well in your state, which have the best attitudes, which ones do best alone (if you only want one) and may even be willing to let you borrow or "Rent to Own" a couple. That is your best bet for information on an animal you are going to invest in. Take a trip next Saturday and learn all you need to know!
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Old 08-12-2013, 05:46 PM   #46
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I'd like to hear their experience also. Mine are easy.

And they will go on a walk with me and the dogs. Hmmmm...
This is the herding tendency I was talking about. They will join in with dogs, chickens, humans, ducks - just about anything that won't attack or eat them. Like dogs, they will also protect anything they think of as "in their herd." The neighbor's goat would attack snakes and hawks that went after his chickens. We never did figure out how he gored the snake with his horn, but it was funny to see him trying to shake his head hard enough to get the snake off of his horn and the now-dead snake flailing all over the place...
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Old 08-14-2013, 06:29 PM   #47
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http://news.yahoo.com/baa-ohare-turns-goats-clear-airfield-brush-215819395.html

Ohare airport is bringing in goats to clear brush.
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:18 AM   #48
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My wife and I raised dairy and meat goat for over 20 years. She milked them almost year round. We raised two children on goat milk and I still have the cream separator that we used to get the heavy cream out of the milk. Most of ours were Nubian. e did have a few odd breeds throughout the years too. Just before my wife passed away we bought two French Alpine does. Both were like cows. BTW , males are called bucks and the females are does. Real goat people know you are a newbie if you call one a billie or nanny. And goats are actually pretty picky about what the will eat. Goats are browsers like deer not grazers like sheep.
We bought a 6 week old buckling and hand raised him to be a breeder. Bottle fed him and by the time he was old enough to breed he could be led on a leash.
Goat herding is a labor intensive endeavor but the rewards are good milk, butter, and some killer ice cream. My wife even made goat cheese that was was very popular around Christmas time with our friends.
Just ask around if you want info on goats. Goat people are as friendly folk you will ever meet.
If I can be of any help I will be glad to answer to the best of my knowledge and if someone wants/needs a 1911 Delavall separator let me know. It was one of the first electrics ones.
Good luck with you quest.
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Old 08-26-2013, 09:16 PM   #49
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Just a little more on goats... Our goats loved blackberry bushes and star thistle. Along with fruit trees, wifes rose bushes, most anything in the garden and oak leaves. We raised Boar babies and sold them as meat goats toward the end. Our Boar buck weighed close to 250 lbs and had great conformation. Sold some of his offspring to people in Idaho to extend the bloodline.
If I wasnt so lazy I would get a couple more just for the company. They are very social animals, can be trained as pack animals and can be eaten in an emergency. Keep your barn and milk room spotless and the milk is great. Keep your buck away from the milk room as far as possible.
You can make a quick Ricotta cheese very easy too. Makes great lasagna.
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:25 PM   #50
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So, I have been doing some side work for a farmer on and off ...
He seems to have a soft spot for his goats, though. He's got some for sale, very reasonable @ $100/pair. Now, like I said, I'm no farmer, but it has dawned on me that if the SHTF, farming your own food is what's really going to do it for you. Not that goats are food..........For now, I'm half interested in them ...
Keep this incident in mind...

WINDSOR, Vt. (AP) — A pile of goat manure spontaneously caught fire, spreading stench and wrinkling noses through a Vermont town but causing no damage, officials said.

The odor evoked "a damp kind of burning leaves or brush fire," Windsor Town Manager Tom Marsh said.

A worker on her way to milk goats discovered the fire in the 120-cubic-yard manure pile around 3 a.m. Wednesday, said George Redick, owner of the 800-goat Oak Knoll Dairy. He and others put out the flames with water from a hose but the pile continued to smolder. He planned to call the fire department later in the morning, but firefighters were already searching for the source of the smell by 6:30 a.m.

Marsh said he could smell the fire at his hilltop home five miles away. He called it "a little disconcerting, because it was a very strong smell."

Redick says the manure would typically have been spread around the farm earlier in the year, but the rainy season and other factors kept that from happening.

He said he used to think spontaneous combustion was make-believe.

"Now I'm a believer," he said.


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