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Old 02-12-2012, 06:56 AM   #11
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I actually read somewhere that storing seeds in the freezer not the fridge helps protect the seeds. But they were just referring to storage between growing seasons...if I find that link i'll post it.

Edit: not what I was looking for but here.

http://www.seedforsecurity.com/article.php?articleid=27

Although long term seed storage can be avoided with proper rotation.

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Old 02-12-2012, 02:21 PM   #12
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Here in N. Mississippi, as Feb. 15 approaches, it's time to plant the potatoes. I have the furrows open, fertilizer already applied and a layer of oak leaves in the bottom of the furrow. A row of white and a row of red. This morning the temp. was 17, but a warm-up is predicted for the end of the week. Also time to start the tomato plants.

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Old 02-12-2012, 03:18 PM   #13
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Patriots Supply is were i got my survival seed bank lots lots of seeds i just bought one say it good for 5 years i just bought it to store seeds in case i need them i just leave them set in my room on the dresser 60 degrees and dry in their their double seadled and in a container other than that i buy my seeds from the amish locally i just like to have a good mess of diffrent seeds avaible in case you no somethin happens and the patriots survival seed bank is good deal! also local seeds least for here they grow em southern indiana

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Old 02-12-2012, 03:36 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by ellis36 View Post
Here in N. Mississippi, as Feb. 15 approaches, it's time to plant the potatoes. I have the furrows open, fertilizer already applied and a layer of oak leaves in the bottom of the furrow. A row of white and a row of red. This morning the temp. was 17, but a warm-up is predicted for the end of the week. Also time to start the tomato plants.
I do my potatoes in 55 gallon drums. I put about a foot of soil in the bottom, plant three or four pieces of potato. When these plants get to be about 8 inches tall I bury them with more soil. Keep it up until they barrel is full. This works great for me. When digging the potatoes I just dump over the barrel. Works like a charm. I have 5 barrels for potatoes.

Be sure to use barrels that have not had any chemicals in them. My barrels came from a newspaper and had India ink in them. I burned them clean and they have been in use for 15 years or so.
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Old 02-12-2012, 03:38 PM   #15
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Viking;
There is an avenue of preparedness that suggests self sufficiency through supplying your own food including growing and harvesting it. I am not, nor are my friends, farmers (herb and vegetable gardens as well as chickens notwithstanding). And we don't want to be. But we could and would have to be under some extreme circumstances that last years. That's why the seeds. That's why the kits/seedbank/storage product availability.

We're not looking forward to it but there could be a time when people have nothing but time for that kind of thing...

Sorry -- don't mean to hijack the "tips" thread and should start another.

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Old 02-12-2012, 06:39 PM   #16
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I do my potatoes in 55 gallon drums. I put about a foor of soil in the bottom, plant three or four pieces of potato. When these plants get to be about 8 inches tall I bury them with more soil. Keep it up until they barrel is full. This works great for me. When digging the potatoes I just dump over the barrel. Works like a charm. I have 5 barrels for potatoes.
Great idea! I see you know about potatoes.
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Old 02-12-2012, 11:53 PM   #17
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Great idea! I see you know about potatoes.
There's an Irish joke in there somewhere.

Now I know were I've been going wrong with my compost (not tuning it). I do add fish parts to it on occasion and that adds to the smell also, but its worth it.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:14 AM   #18
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Viking;
There is an avenue of preparedness that suggests self sufficiency through supplying your own food including growing and harvesting it. I am not, nor are my friends, farmers (herb and vegetable gardens as well as chickens notwithstanding). And we don't want to be. But we could and would have to be under some extreme circumstances that last years. That's why the seeds. That's why the kits/seedbank/storage product availability.

We're not looking forward to it but there could be a time when people have nothing but time for that kind of thing...

Sorry -- don't mean to hijack the "tips" thread and should start another.
I do understand where you are coming from, but I don't understand (and I am not knocking the concept, just trying to figure it out) how one could reasonably expect to one day start growing enough food to support their family under SHTF scenario if they don't practice it on a smaller scale with the seeds that they are banking on for the future. Keeping your seed bank fresh is incredibly important for most plants. Unfortunately the plants that freshness is not an issue with are weeds.

I would suggest that one would plant at least some of the crops that you have purchased for storage just to learn how they are grown. Say one row of wheat, a couple of tomatoes, some corn, only a few seeds from each package. Learn how to process wheat when it is ripe. ( I have no idea how to do this myself). My point is that doing is knowing.

On another related subject, today my son and I spent several hours with a guy who taught us how to cut and store scion wood for grafting (with chestnut), then he taught us how to make several different types of grafts on apple trees. I have fumbled around with it in the past with marginal success and I learned volumes today, this will help me to become more successful in the future. Grafting is an art that cannot be learned on the internet, at least not in a greatly useful way. Doing it is knowing it. Oh, and another thing I learned I was doing wrong was using the wrong tools. A specially ground very sharp knife is almost an absolute requirement for the proper cuts. I had been using a typically ground very sharp knife that would tend to cut a curved whip rather than the straight whip that is needed.

Anyhow, great day learning something that I am putting to practice this week and long into the future.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:38 AM   #19
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i have to agree with Viking even tho i have been blessed with living on a farm my whole life and learning how to do things with my hands. i agree folks should as least learn how to grow crops on a small scale how to weed cultivate side dress with fertilizer etc folks should also learn how to kill slaughter a chicken coon deer and such that way when the time comes when they need to do it their not wondering HOW

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Old 02-14-2012, 12:28 AM   #20
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Short term, intermediate, long term vs. starting over as a subsistance farmer. I'm not concerned about knowing how nor being able to, just having the seeds to do it because we are NOT doing it today for tomorrow.

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