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-   -   First aid kits (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/first-aid-kits-105517/)

rifleman1 03-27-2014 03:10 AM

First aid kits
 
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I just received my suture kit and oasis disposable skin stapler,I have been trying to think of more essential first aid items to add to my kit and this is what I came up with so far.
What would be a good alternative string to use to stich wounds in lew of actual suture? And another thing besides the basics in a first aid kit what would be a must in your kit?
My goal is to have everything I would need from basic cuts and scrapes to knife and gun wounds and broken bones.
This is going to be my bug out first aid kit and I'm trying to get everything one would need to treat myself and my family.

SSGN_Doc 03-27-2014 03:39 AM

I don't consider a minor surgery kit as "first aid".

Quick clot, tampons (good for packing into
Puncture wounds, or for bloody noses). Superglue. Sterile gauze. Some iodine. Ace wraps. Silk tape. band-aids. Surplus battle dressings. Trauma sheers. A couple sets of hemostats. OP airways. Nasal trumpets. A couple of chest seals. Roll gauze. SAM Splints.

Suture material should be sterile, and non porous if you don't have absorbable suture for deep layers. If you are going to try closing wounds, then you need sterile water or saline. Another couple reasons I don't think of surgical supplies as "first aid". If doing minor procedures with a scalpel, you should probably have lidocaine and sterile syringes and needles.

Not knowing your background, I'd have to ask if you have actually done any wound closures, or minor surgeries?

Axxe55 03-27-2014 03:41 AM

good idea for a thread!

subscribed to learn a bit more myself. my first aid kits are pretty basic in nature and it's quite possible i may need to update or expand them to make them more usuable.

rifleman1 03-27-2014 03:49 AM

[QUOTE=SSGN_Doc;1541264]I don't consider a minor surgery kit as "first aid".

Quick clot, tampons (good for packing into
Puncture wounds, or for bloody noses). Superglue. Sterile gauze. Some iodine. Ace wraps. Silk tape. band-aids. Surplus battle dressings. Trauma sheers. A couple sets of hemostats. OP airways. Nasal trumpets. A couple of chest seals. Roll gauze. SAM Splints.

Suture material should be sterile, and non porous if you don't have absorbable suture for deep layers. If you are going to try closing wounds, then you need sterile water or saline. Another couple reasons I don't think of surgical supplies as "first aid". If doing minor procedures with a scalpel, you should probably have lidocaine and sterile syringes and needles.

Not knowing your background, I'd have to ask if you have actually done any wound closures, or minor




Everything I need is in the books I have and I would rather have the supplies than not. This is a bugout bag I do not plan on suturing or doing surgeries just for fun this Is a bag that will go with us if the shtf.i hope to never have to use it.but I would rather have than not .

SSGN_Doc 03-27-2014 04:53 AM

[quote=rifleman1;1541281]
Quote:

Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc (Post 1541264)
I don't consider a minor surgery kit as "first aid".

Quick clot, tampons (good for packing into
Puncture wounds, or for bloody noses). Superglue. Sterile gauze. Some iodine. Ace wraps. Silk tape. band-aids. Surplus battle dressings. Trauma sheers. A couple sets of hemostats. OP airways. Nasal trumpets. A couple of chest seals. Roll gauze. SAM Splints.

Suture material should be sterile, and non porous if you don't have absorbable suture for deep layers. If you are going to try closing wounds, then you need sterile water or saline. Another couple reasons I don't think of surgical supplies as "first aid". If doing minor procedures with a scalpel, you should probably have lidocaine and sterile syringes and needles.

Not knowing your background, I'd have to ask if you have actually done any wound closures, or minor




Everything I need is in the books I have and I would rather have the supplies than not. This is a bugout bag I do not plan on suturing or doing surgeries just for fun this Is a bag that will go with us if the shtf.i hope to never have to use it.but I would rather have than not .

The issue is that if you don't know about wound closure, you can actually do more harm than good. Closing a deep puncture wound can be inviting infection. Closing a wound too late may also lead to poor results as can leaving sutures in too long, or not long enough

"First aid" is the sort of stuff you do for either very minor injuries that require little or no professional medical follow up, or are only buying time to get you to professional medical help, usually within hours, or maybe a day or two in extreme situations. Once someone is hurt is not the time to learn suturing. Layered closure techniques, evaluating nerve and vascular damage, administration of anesthesia, inoculation for tetanus, decision making regarding whether to close a wound at all is usually the product of some experience.

American Rescue products has some nice kits that provide most of what you need for basic first aid. They come in wide varieties, to meet needs from very basic small kits for very general first aid to more specific kits for maritime use, to tactical self aid or advanced trauma kits. Looking at their kits should give you some good ideas of what is out there. I had a few different varieties of their kits aboard the submarine. I really like some of their newer battle dressings.

SSGN_Doc 03-27-2014 05:14 AM

That should be North American Rescue Products.

Popgun 03-27-2014 05:20 AM

I remember cutting myself pretty good one time in my garage. I pulled the skin together and wrapped it tight with some "blue tape" I had handy. When I got to the emergency room to have it stitched up, the nurses complimented me for using blue tape as they said that it was very effective in closing a wound to stop the bleeding and yet it's not too hard to remove.

Ahhh, another good use for blue tape

rifleman1 03-27-2014 05:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc (Post 1541372)
That should be North American Rescue Products.

I'm going to check it out,thanks.

Doc3402 03-27-2014 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc (Post 1541264)
I don't consider a minor surgery kit as "first aid".

Quick clot, tampons (good for packing into
Puncture wounds, or for bloody noses). Superglue. Sterile gauze. Some iodine. Ace wraps. Silk tape. band-aids. Surplus battle dressings. Trauma sheers. A couple sets of hemostats. OP airways. Nasal trumpets. A couple of chest seals. Roll gauze. SAM Splints.

Suture material should be sterile, and non porous if you don't have absorbable suture for deep layers. If you are going to try closing wounds, then you need sterile water or saline. Another couple reasons I don't think of surgical supplies as "first aid". If doing minor procedures with a scalpel, you should probably have lidocaine and sterile syringes and needles.

Not knowing your background, I'd have to ask if you have actually done any wound closures, or minor surgeries?

You missed maternity pads. I love those things. In my opinion they are more versatile than ABD pads because of their size and shape.

I would carry superglue, tincture of Benzoin, and butterfly closures long before I would mess with a suture kit, and I know how to suture.

SSGN_Doc 03-27-2014 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doc3402 (Post 1541436)
You missed maternity pads. I love those things. In my opinion they are more versatile than ABD pads because of their size and shape.

I would carry superglue, tincture of Benzoin, and butterfly closures long before I would mess with a suture kit, and I know how to suture.

Spot on, brother. Anything deeper than what can be taken care of with the benzoin and steri-strips, or superglue, should raise the question of seeking advanced medical care, or if it should be closed at all. Some wounds are better off being left open, and then packed, with daily dressing changes until they close from the bottom of the wound all the way back to the surface. Usually it's a process of weeks, but less likely to get infected or leave bacteria harboring pockets under the surface of a closed wound.


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