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Old 04-21-2011, 05:24 PM   #11
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This is the one I have in my pack. It's low cost and reliable. You don't absolutely need the stand, but it's very helpful with larger pots and pans or if you have something heavy (like a pot of water).

Also, do a search for tin can stove or hobo can stove. If you have a multi-tool with shears or a good blade and a punch (the 1/32" one in your kit for handgun repair is perfect) you can make one in about 15 minutes. It will run on isopropyl alcohol and other fuels.
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Old 04-21-2011, 05:38 PM   #12
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I also keep a bunch of Sterno around. I have been putting off buying Esbit Stoves, but I plan on getting them and fuel soon.
The Esbits are good in a pinch, but seem to make a sooty mess on my steel pans. I keep a few of them around though.

I would like to make a coffee kit around some Sterno cans . Funny enough, after seeing my share of hurricanes and power outages, the thing I missed most was always a good hot cup of coffee. I bought a single cup filter (looks like a small oil funnel) and when I'm outside it comes in handy. Takes about 10 minutes to make a cup.
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Old 04-21-2011, 06:09 PM   #13
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I have lots of backup for coffee. Two electric drip coffee makers, a large Melitta drip pot & filters, two of the single cup filters like yours and an old fashioned espresso pot. I've got to have my coffee.

I do still need to pick up a percolator from a thrift store.

I also need a griddle.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:32 PM   #14
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O.K. I may upset a few here, but do you guys do REAL BUSHCRAFT, whereby you use what you find in the woods, and survive or do you lug loads of heavy gear ie cooking stoves etc. Anyone care to lay down a list of what you would take for say a 4 day trip into the woods, Ie Bivvy, Paracord, knives, I used plural, as I take 2, everytime. plus the usual fire starting items.etc.

Jungleman.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:42 PM   #15
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I don't really know much about "bushcraft". I've done a bunch of hiking and backpacking in my life. Now that I'm older, I go "camping".

Quite honestly, If I'm left in the woods with nothing, I don't think I'll fare all that well. However, I've planned for most eventualities and I believe I'll be okay.

Why not start a new thread about bushcraft? You can make it a "how to". I know that I'd read it to learn new skills.
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:03 PM   #16
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I don't really know much about "bushcraft". I've done a bunch of hiking and backpacking in my life. Now that I'm older, I go "camping".

Quite honestly, If I'm left in the woods with nothing, I don't think I'll fare all that well. However, I've planned for most eventualities and I believe I'll be okay.

Why not start a new thread about bushcraft? You can make it a "how to". I know that I'd read it to learn new skills.
O.K. I will give it twirl and see how it goes. Please bear in mind I do NOT know it all, and don't pretend to, one never ceases to learn, from the day he is born till the day he dies.

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Old 04-21-2011, 09:05 PM   #17
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Go for it. The prevailing attitude around here is that we can all learn from each other.

BTW, I just started a suggested reading thread in survival/preps based on our PM's yesterday.
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:12 PM   #18
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O.K. I may upset a few here, but do you guys do REAL BUSHCRAFT, whereby you use what you find in the woods, and survive or do you lug loads of heavy gear ie cooking stoves etc. Anyone care to lay down a list of what you would take for say a 4 day trip into the woods, Ie Bivvy, Paracord, knives, I used plural, as I take 2, everytime. plus the usual fire starting items.etc.

Jungleman.
I pack pretty heavy. I've done a few canoe trips from Florida city up along the Everglades, Ocala, a couple spots in Georgia some years ago, and miscellaneous other places for two to three days. Weight is an issue. In most places we can park and then do a short hike (2-3 miles) to the camp site so carrying 40lbs of gear is not so bad. Any further than that and the fun factor goes down a whole lot.

I almost always carry a gallon of water in the main pack and 1/2 gallon in the front. That accounts for the majority of the weight. If you can find potable water (or make it potable) then you can save a lot of weight. Getting used to drinking tea-colored water is a process though. Even with a Katadyn or other filter it still doesn't look "clean", but after boiling should be fine though may be a bit salty or bitter. I usually just make coffee from it and then that's only if my grocery store water supply is out.

Other than that, I have a small tent (either 1 person sleeper or a 4-person if my family is along with me), sleeping bag, cooking equipment and emergency food. The cooking equipment is cheap and a bit flimsy, but also lightweight. I've had them for about five years and they haven't busted yet. In some places there are bans on open fires so either carry a heavy metal pot or use a mini camp stove. I went with the single burner camp stove.

I applaud folks who go out there with less, but that part of my life is over I'm more interested in fishing by a river than duking it out with Nature :/.

As for knives, I used to carry a Gerber LMF II, Buck Nighthawk, or a Gerber Prodigy. Recently I've been carrying just a Mora knife. This is a consequence of not needing to gather firewood (because of the mentioned open fire ban).

And I confess that I also carry a GPS unit (in addition to my compass and map). And a couple lighters alongside my matches. Toilet paper, toothbrush/paste, baby wipes, drink flavor packets, etc.. I carry some rope for hanging up clothes and replacement shoelaces, etc..

Don't get me wrong, I enjoy getting closer to Nature, but if I have to sleep one more night with some beetle crawling up my nose I'm going to go batty. And mosquitoes.. geez. Sometimes they get so thick that you can literally swing your hand through the air and get two or three of them in your hand.
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Old 04-22-2011, 01:04 AM   #19
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My load lbs. for a 15 day treck for just me is just under 40 lbs. I can feed myself for this time without supplementing off the land. I do, however, suppliment off the land during these trecks and have food left over when I'm done with these 15 or so day trecks. Now if I take my 7 Y.O. grandson I end up having to ramp my packweight to 50 lbs. or so to accomodate his load. Thats fine because it's his learning time.

We usually hike the PCT (Pacific Coast Trail) and bail off to go to high alitiude lakes and streams to get fish. We also know the plants we can eat and cook them up as well. It's all good times and we like it. My 7 Y.O. grandson has become quite the trout slayer and we eat well when on these trecks.

I'll have to say that last year I upgraded all my back packing gear to new modern light weight high tech good stuff. It had been since the early 70's and through the early 80's that I had made these trips with the old stuff. Getting rid of the old heavy not so efficient stuff was amazing with whats available now.

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Old 04-22-2011, 02:00 AM   #20
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I have lots of backup for coffee. Two electric drip coffee makers, a large Melitta drip pot & filters, two of the single cup filters like yours and an old fashioned espresso pot. I've got to have my coffee.

I do still need to pick up a percolator from a thrift store.

I also need a griddle.
Hehe.. Now you are prepared for all eventualities, sir.


A griddle is an idea. My daughter would be thrilled if I made up some waffles outside.
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