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-   -   The Cobb Cooker - Review (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/cobb-cooker-review-38476/)

Swampbilly 02-14-2011 08:39 PM

The Cobb Cooker - Review
 
I have seen people do the convection/grilling cooking in the Big Green Eggs, or the Bubba Kegs, but me not having the storage space, I had my eye and doing research on the Cobb Cooker.

It originally got the name, "Cobb", because it was developed in Africa for back country people or tribes who didn't have modern cooking equipment. What they had for fuel was plenty of corn cobs, and the original cooker was designed to use corn cobs as fuel. Later it evolved into using charcoal.
This is the 5th generation of this cooker.

Anyway, I thought this would provide the same quality roasting/grilling, yet very portable, easily stored, and really efficient on coal usage. Could also be optimum for the bug out crowd.

Company website, and link to Pro Model Cooker...they've marked them down temporarily since the holidays. Don't know how long it will stay this price :

Remember, the roasting rack is an added accessory, or find a cheaper one locally. It comes with a nice canvas carry bag too :

Cobb Portable Grill Store - The Cobb Premier Deluxe

Cobb Portable Grill Store - The Cobb fenced roasting rack

OR...

You can choose the Ultimate Package, with all of the accessories :

Cobb Portable Grill Store - The Cobb Premier Ultimate Kitchen-In-A-Box

Cobb Cooker Animation :


I saw this as another convection grilling option, but much more portable and easier to store...what I needed :

http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...-Grill_2_0.jpg


Finally bought one several days back and tried it for the first time last night. I sent it on its maiden voyage with a 2-lb piece of beef brisket.
I injected the brisket and then poured remaining marinade into the Zip-Lok bag with the brisket. Normally, I would have marinaded it overnight, but this one was 6 hours. I injected the Stubs Beef Marinade...the Jim Beam mustard was later added to the remaining that was added to the bag.


After it marinaded for 6 hours, I then removed it from the bag and dry rubbed it liberally with Chef Leo's "Game & Meat Rub", which I bought at the gun show.
http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...Brisket-02.jpg


The thing about the Cobb Cooker, is it is very efficient and takes very few brickets to cook...I only had 3 pieces of hardwood charcoal (2 large, 1 smaller) in the fire basket.

So, I poured 1-cup of water and 1/2 cup of beef broth into the "moat" that surrounds the fire basket. Once your coals are white, you put the lid on and wait 10 minutes for it to heat up.
Then I added some wet hickory chips to the top of the coals for smoking. PLaced the brisket into a foil "bowl", with some chopped onions and bell pepper and about 3/4 cup of water/beef broth mixture. Put that on the grill, covered it, and soon had some hickory smoke venting out.

After 1-hour / 10 minutes, I added 1 small coal to the fire...1-hour / 10 minutes later (Two hours / 20 minutes total time), opened her up and here's how the brisket shaped up :

http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...Brisket-04.jpg


I wish you could have smelled and tasted how incredible the gravy was that developed from this brisket. It definitley picked up some of the smokiness flavor from the hickory.

I cooked this 2-lb brisket for 2 hours/ 20 minutes, with 3 hardwood coals, later adding 1 coal and the meat thermometer read 168 degrees. I pulled it, wrapped it in foil and let it sit in a warm oven for 10 minutes prior to slicing it. For my first brisket and first time using the Cobb Cooker, I was very pleased. I probably could have gotten by with 3 coals and cooked it closer to 3 hours...might have been a bit more tender, but still was very good...the gravy was awe inspiring.


Coupled the brisket with some cornbread dressing, all drizzled with that fantastic brown gravy...I judged it a success for the first outing with the Cobb Cooker !
http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...Brisket-07.jpg


Next project...cornish hens.


Regards,

Swampbilly

Swampbilly 02-14-2011 08:41 PM

<delete this>

Troy Michalik 02-15-2011 08:43 PM

Great write up billy. I'd never heard of a cobb cooker before now. It looks like a pretty quality piece and something that definitely fills a niche. I imagine this would be excellent for the boat or apartment/condo dwellers.

They mentioned backpacking in the video, but that would be really pushing it I'm afraid. I know I for one wouldn't want to be the one packing that thing in and out of the hills.

Definitely something I would consider if I was in the market.

Let us know how those hens turn out.

Swampbilly 02-15-2011 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troy Michalik (Post 446206)
Great write up billy. I'd never heard of a cobb cooker before now. It looks like a pretty quality piece and something that definitely fills a niche. I imagine this would be excellent for the boat or apartment/condo dwellers.

They mentioned backpacking in the video, but that would be really pushing it I'm afraid. I know I for one wouldn't want to be the one packing that thing in and out of the hills.

Definitely something I would consider if I was in the market.

Let us know how those hens turn out.


It does come with a handy carrying bag, but yeah it might be cumbersome for an extended backpacking trip. However, I think it would be do-able on short hikes, a day trip, or a day at the beach.

I roasted the cornish hens last night and they were GREAT !! Will post about that soon.


Regards,

Swampbilly

Troy Michalik 02-16-2011 12:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Swampbilly (Post 446312)
I think it would be do-able on short hikes, a day trip, or a day at the beach.

Very true.

mrm14 02-16-2011 01:19 AM

Looks like a pretty neat little unit. Backpacking with it would definately be a no as most of us count our gear and food weight in ounces for longer treks.

For day trips, short day hikes, possibly base camps, or car camping this cooker should be great.


Slow cooking is the way to go for the best results and I really like that it is immune from high winds.

lonyaeger 02-16-2011 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrm14 (Post 446383)
I really like that it is immune from high winds.

That might be perfect for me when relaxing after a few bowls of my famous "Campfire Pintos!"

Swampbilly 02-21-2011 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrm14 (Post 446383)
Looks like a pretty neat little unit. Backpacking with it would definately be a no as most of us count our gear and food weight in ounces for longer treks.

For day trips, short day hikes, possibly base camps, or car camping this cooker should be great.


Slow cooking is the way to go for the best results and I really like that it is immune from high winds.


Here's my "Round 2" testing on some cornish hens :

So, my second outing with the Cobb Cooker resulted in another great experience. Below are the results on the cornish hens. These were cooked with 6 hardwood coals worth of "fuel" for the cooker.

I rubbed the birds with lemon juice, then butter, then coated with "Paul Prudhomme's Poultry Magic" seasoning. Then stuffed the birds with two good lemon wedges and a sprig of fresh basil. In the "moat" of the cooker, I added 1-1/2 cups of water with 1-tablespoon of chicken bulion dissolved in it and dropped two sprigs of fresh basil in that fluid.

I cooked the hens for the first 50 minutes with the foil open so the flavors and moisture from the moat could permeate the meat...then I closed up the foil pouches and cooked the hens for another 30 minutes to let them steam good. In the photo below I'm about to close up the foil :

http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...sh_Hens_01.jpg


Again, some fantastic gravy develops during the cooking process. I could grab the leg bone, twist it, and it pulled right out of the meat - perfect ! :

http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...sh_Hens_02.jpg


...and it was as good as it looks :

http://i377.photobucket.com/albums/o...sh_Hens_03.jpg



Regards,

Swampbilly

Nomad 1 02-21-2011 02:39 PM

Sub forum potential
 
Wow - That looks really good.

Perhaps we should start a sub forum for gourmet cooking.:D

It might seem like an oxymoron under the survival and sustenance heading but what the heck.

Swampbilly 02-21-2011 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nomad 1 (Post 450253)
Wow - That looks really good.

Perhaps we should start a sub forum for gourmet cooking.:D

It might seem like an oxymoron under the survival and sustenance heading but what the heck.

:) :)

Thanks !

What I hoped to communicate with these posts are the quality of roasting/cooking that a person can do with the Cobb Cooker with only a few basic spices and ingredients, fire starter sticks, and a couple of handfulls of coals. I'm really impressed with the fuel efficiency in coals usage in this unit. Add on accessories expand your cooking for grilling and frying.

If a person was looking to outfit a camp, day hike or trip to the beach, or an outdoor festival with some good cooking, easily transportable, the Cobb Cooker is great ! I can store the coals, fire starter, and spices in the cooker and pack it all along in the canvas carry bag.


Regards,

Swampbilly


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