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Old 04-15-2014, 04:30 PM   #21
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So a hicker bag is bad!?! Attachment 142144 like that 1 is what I was thinkin


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Kelty makes decent hiker bags, but they definitely aren't as tough as some of the more tactical leaning bags. I've owned quite a few brands. If you're going to spend $119 on a kelty redwing, you might as well pony up the extra $20 and get the 511 rush 72. The Rush holds more equipment, has better organization, and the 1050d nylon is MUCH stronger than what kelty is currently using. The only advantage to a frame pack would be if you were going to hike frequently and for very long distances. I've hiked a few miles with 30 lbs in my Rush bag and my shoulders were a little sore. But, a bug out bag isn't necessarily designed to be a hiker. If I'm going on a backpacking trip, I'd use something like an external frame Osprey or Kelty. For a bug out bag I'd stick with something heavy duty like a tactical bag. All this is just from my experience but I hope it helps. If you ever need gear suggestions I could help there too. I like to buy quality gear but at reasonable prices.
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Old 04-16-2014, 02:19 AM   #22
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29.2# on my bag fully loaded .
Everything is stitched very well

There is just enough space in the bag for a weekend of prepacked freze dried food.
Main interior has AK pistol 2 full mags and 40 rds boxed up , change of clothing, rain gear and tarp, cooking gear with alcohol stove and msr water filter ,



Interior #2 is mainly firstaid items , 91% alcohol which can be for first aid and cooking fuel anda bottle of peroxide good for first aid and mouth wash . In the roll up bag is firstaid and personal hygene supplies along with a military bivy sack , and 100 ft of 300# braided cord which works great for holding tarps up and making line for bank poles to catch catfish and turtles . Which I turn keep ur guts full.




Lower rear compartment contains fire starting goods , bic, jet lighter , and spark fire starter , home vacced vaseline soaked cotton balls , long forceps, pens, sharpie, flashlight, and 2 rolls of butt wiper . Yes these are 2 full rolls without the tubes



Upper top compartment
Headlamp, waterproof playing cards, fishing kit, hand warmers, zip ties and a few other misc usable items,



Exterior I keep a couple reusable zip ties, para cord , 2 knives , cord tensioners, and biners for tarp


Interior under backpad is a 2 liter hydration bladder .
I can dump about 8# losing the AK and ammo . Which to save some weight on a standard trip I would normally pack a .22lr pistol and 100 rds. And that will allow for stove fuel and food .

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Old 04-16-2014, 02:43 AM   #23
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When I do pack my own food I try to dehydrate my meals a few days ahead before going . Heres a all in one camp favorite of mine . 1 cup White rice, 4 pieces of chopped teryaki jerky , dried broccoli, dried peas , 1 dried egg, salt , pepper, crushed red pepper with a dash of curry powder in a vaccum bag , Add a little over 1 cup of water and cook until rice is done . Mmmmm , mmmmm good .
A favorite breakfast one is 1 cup of oatmeal , dried apple or peaches, cinnamon and sugar in a vac bag , add water until you get the consistanty you like, add hot water , wait a few minutes and breakfast is served ,
One more breakfast favorite is dried eggs, cooked and dried bacon or dried ham, powdered cheese , add hot water until eggs are fluffy .
Rice is good for you but you cant make it on rice alone . You need protein and vegetables in your diet, . I have not tried dandelion salad but thats on the agenda to try this summer . Oh and dont forget a small squeeze bottle of cooking oil if you intent to try to make anything with flour like pot bread pizza

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Old 04-16-2014, 01:29 PM   #24
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Purehavoc, your load out is very similar to mine. I dont carry as much liquid (alcohol and peroxide) to keep weight down. I use life straws right now but I'd like to get one of those msr filters. Nice gear.

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Old 04-16-2014, 02:44 PM   #25
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It's a great setup, PureHavoc! I'll echo Fernando in that mine is very similar. I used a book, "Build the Perfect Survival Kit," that helped me realize what was necessary and what was fluff.

One thing I found interesting was the difference between a survival kit and a bug out bag. The bug out bag is ONLY to go from point A (place of disaster) to point B (safe haven) in 72 hours. Therefore, you don't carry water filters; You carry water. You don't carry snares and fish hooks to catch food; You carry actual food. The BOB is for only 72-hours of immediate needs and should be both fast to use and allow you to keep travelling to your safe haven. A survival kit should be long-term and include tools and equipment that are more persistent in longevity. Axe to build shelters, flint & steel for fire building and snares and fishing tackle to provide food. This difference will keep one from overloading a BOB with unnecessary and frivolous items that aren't needed for its short-lived intended purpose.

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Old 04-16-2014, 03:20 PM   #26
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It's a great setup, PureHavoc! I'll echo Fernando in that mine is very similar. I used a book, "Build the Perfect Survival Kit," that helped me realize what was necessary and what was fluff.

One thing I found interesting was the difference between a survival kit and a bug out bag. The bug out bag is ONLY to go from point A (place of disaster) to point B (safe haven) in 72 hours. Therefore, you don't carry water filters; You carry water. You don't carry snares and fish hooks to catch food; You carry actual food. The BOB is for only 72-hours of immediate needs and should be both fast to use and allow you to keep travelling to your safe haven. A survival kit should be long-term and include tools and equipment that are more persistent in longevity. Axe to build shelters, flint & steel for fire building and snares and fishing tackle to provide food. This difference will keep one from overloading a BOB with unnecessary and frivolous items that aren't needed for its short-lived intended purpose.
My alcohol and peroxide bottles are the half size bottle but they both have multi uses for first aid and fuel and hygiene purposes . I do carry a small hatchet when I go but it usually goes in the kayak if I head out in it but it can be clipped on the bag and that huge OKC knife doubles as a hatchet for chopping and shovel for digging so its not something I really need and the hatchet just adds weight . I dont carry any water other than whats in my hydration bladder , I do carry a empty bottle clipped on to the side of my bag that my water filter screws on to , I use that for cooking , cleaning and general use . I try to make my bag as universal as I can without unneeded stuff .
If you build your bag off of a book you will find that you end up with alot of stuff you dont really need or use that takes up alot of space or adds extra weight to your bag. What I have found out that works best to decide what you need is to just load it with what you think you will use the most and go for a couple days . You will find out quickly what you wish you had thats not in your bag and at the end of your time you will see what you use the least or didnt need and you can modify from there . Dont skimp on your first aid because you "didnt use it ". That stuff is a must have , its light weight and takes minimal space .
Yes I dont need a bivy sack in there but it requires minimal space but I dont need a sleeping bag with it and its water proof which sleeping on the ground with a sleeping bag and tarp isnt always the driest living conditions if its raining . I learned this on a 9 day primitive trip in Minnesota about 20 years ago . . A tarp and rain gear is a essential item in my bag . In IL our weather is so unpredictable and a tarp will help keep you dry during the day and help keep the bivy covered at night if its raining , where as a sleeping bag and tarp " well you know how that can turn out " if you try it just once while its raining . I will just say sleeping in a wet bag for 2-3 days sucks big time.
Water purification is a must have in my bag, a lifestraw is a good thing to have for a bug out bag but its not a good way to get water in a storage container and have you ever tried using one from a kayak . LOL " splash " with the MSR water works I have I pitch it over the side , screw my water bottle on to the bottom of it and pump away . . I dont like the taste of iodine tabs in my water and muddy water is still muddy water . The filter does a pretty good job of making it look drinkable from the river water . Always use the cleanest water you can find to help prevent clogging of the filter .
Fire starting tabs are always a must in my bag , wet wood is harder than hell to get started and these home brewed vaseline cotton balls burn work well . one tiny vased cotton ball will burn for roughly 2-3 minutes with a good sized " 3-4" flame .
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Old 04-16-2014, 04:14 PM   #27
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I keep a few coffee filter in my bag to strain the water before filtering if it's really silty. I guess my bob is kind of leaning towards survival as well. There's definetly some stuff I could cut down on. I love that big Okc knife because you can process wood with it. I have a small saw to cut large branches. I found my hatchet to be just added weight that I didnt need. I need one of those msr filters though. I agree on all your points about the life straw. I carry a lot more trioxane tablets than I'd probably need. My smaller edc bag (the rush 12) actually has some of my long term survival stuff in it like emergency fishing gear and some snare wire. It's a lot of fun to be prepared and I find it relaxing to organize my gear. The ONLY thing I feel like I'm missing from my trauma kit is a tourniquette (spelling). I gotta pick up one of those nice CATs. Theres some iodine tabs in my kit too but I agree they make the water taste gross.

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Old 04-16-2014, 04:33 PM   #28
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The book I mentioned was very critical of analyzing usefulness and weight of each item, which PureHavoc obviously has done! You're absolutely right about the first aid kits - very small, never leave them out. Also, things like fire tabs, matches and Vaseline-cotton balls are small, light and can save your life when it's cold/rainy/snowy and getting dark. I have started fires in adverse conditions within minutes and would NEVER kick fire starters and fire aids out of my kit. I like having at least three different ways to start fires as a bare minimum. However, every item should have a very specific purpose, and multiple purposes, if possible.

One thing I learned was to address each need in every kit you build. Start with the realization that you will have to address basic human needs, such as warmth, shelter, food, water, first aid, defense, signalling and others. Each one should be covered, and each item should clearly fall into one or more categories. For example, a gun is obviously self defense, but it could also classify as food (for hunting) and fire staring aid (rounds can be opened to access gunpowder). Also, this book builds all the way from mini-kits the size of an Altoids can up to extra large vehicle kits. It's amazing to build an Altoids-can-sized kit that has fire, light, signalling, food, first aid, defense and shelter! That process makes it much easier to critically evaluate the bigger kits and not get lazy about throwing everything in it just because there is room.

PureHavoc has obviously worked hard on his BOB as it is well thought out and highly efficient. I hope others will share their BOBs and ideas on what items are highly efficient to include.

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Old 04-16-2014, 04:52 PM   #29
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I keep a few coffee filter in my bag to strain the water before filtering if it's really silty. I guess my bob is kind of leaning towards survival as well. There's definetly some stuff I could cut down on. I love that big Okc knife because you can process wood with it. I have a small saw to cut large branches. I found my hatchet to be just added weight that I didnt need. I need one of those msr filters though. I agree on all your points about the life straw. I carry a lot more trioxane tablets than I'd probably need. My smaller edc bag (the rush 12) actually has some of my long term survival stuff in it like emergency fishing gear and some snare wire. It's a lot of fun to be prepared and I find it relaxing to organize my gear. The ONLY thing I feel like I'm missing from my trauma kit is a tourniquette (spelling). I gotta pick up one of those nice CATs. Theres some iodine tabs in my kit too but I agree they make the water taste gross.
I think almost everyone combines survival kit with BOB, and it was a distinction I truly didn't understand until I read up on it. The life straw is something small and very light that should be included in BOBs and kits because it allows you to drink water that wouldn't normally be consumable. In a BOB, this could allow you to rehydrate while moving and not using your carried water, which might be needed later when water can't be found. Very useful, protects your health, takes very little room - ideal!

You mentioned trioxane and fuel for stoves is widely debated as to which is the most efficient as far as weight, burn time, etc. I solved the problem by dumping the fuel and going to an all-steel, burn anything foldable stove. This adds a few ounces for the stove, but I can either burn fuel, such as trioxane tabs, or just leaves and twigs found on the trail. I like the versatility and the idea that I'm never out of fuel.

I love the idea of coffee filters and am thinking I should add that to my own kit. They could also serve as bandages and fire starter material. Filtering water for murkiness isn't always necessary to be drinkable, but anything that makes it more clear and can make your water purifier last longer is a good thing.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:01 PM   #30
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Oh there are a few items I did missed after I thought about it . I have 2 , 2" sections of carbon arrow that I cut off and wrapped with duct tape I think there is 15 ft on each one , one that doubles as a very loud whistle that I made . In that Trauma/ first aid bag amongst many other things is women's plugs which work great for puncture wounds and women's pads which work great for larger cuts or you can cut these to size and use duct tape to make one hell of a great bandage . My alcohol stove fits in my stainless cookware which also has 2 cups with measurement marks on them these work great to just eat out of . You can set the cookware right on top of the stove to cook and boil water . I actually have 2 of these inside of the container one which is more for simmering and the other is for a 3 minute boil " fast cook" . I will take a pic of these when I get home . They are made easily with a small cat food can and a hole punch , they are light , easy to pack and the best part is they actually work well . I have had several different name brand cook stoves in the past and over lots of use had problems with jets , orings etc in them and with most of them exceeding $100 with the stove , pump and fuel canister im not real impressed with commercial stoves unless your in absolute winter conditions then I may change my mind on them , I have to be selective on what I can use for fuel as you cant burn gasoline like some commercial stoves , but gas line antifreeze in the yellow bottles works best and is the cleanest burning , 91% alcohol, 140 proof everclear, are what I have used in my stoves . Right now with winter leaving us gas line antifreeze is super cheap with places clearing the shelves . The hot stove will run about 12 minutes filled, the simmer stove will run about 16 minutes filled . They can be snuffed out with another can over the top if its available . I usually just use enough fuel for 4-5 minutes and let it run out it eliminates having to try to pour fuel back in the bottle which isnt easy to do with this setup . Being thin aluminum they cool very quickly . I prefer to use a camp fire to cook on but I have these if needed and since they dont take up any extra space since they fit in my cook ware and weigh less than 1 oz for the pair they are a keeper . I do keep a rigid plastic Spork in the bag to eat with . I dont have a signalling device " mirror" in there , I really dont have a need but that may be a piece I night add just to have . I would think a piece of plastic mirror would work great and not take up much space. My fishing kit is in a round plastic breath saver type container , its mainly small and large hooks , large and small crimp weights, 25 ft of 30# test fishing line and 2 super small 1/2" panfish bobbers . Next time out I plan on making a bank pole to try out over night and see if I cant drum up a cat fish

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