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-   -   Best place (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/best-place-56518/)

tenntyrant 01-28-2012 10:35 PM

Best place
 
Where is the best place to buy a years worth of food that has a long shelf life? I have been looking at food insurance but it is very high.

fireguy 01-29-2012 05:33 AM

There are a lot of vendors for LTS food out there. I agree that Food Insurance is overpriced. I looked them up a while back and closed out of their site right away. Remember that it is important to look at the calorie count they are basing the year supply on. Some may be at only subsistence levels where others are providing over 2000 calories a day. I have ordered from Sam's Club, they sell Auguson Farms brand. I have also used Freeze Dry Guy, Ready Made Resource, and Emergency Essentials.

I haven't bought a year supply package from any of them. I pick and choose different packages to augment my wheat, rice, and beans.

bkt 01-29-2012 12:16 PM

Check if there are any Mormon (LDS) cannery sites near you. Call them and arrange a time when you and some friends can go in and can your own dry goods. They usually have a great selection. The process can be messy, but you know exactly what you're getting and it's cheap.

You don't need to be a Mormon to do it. You can't just buy canned stuff there; you have to do the work to can whatever bags you open (flour, pasta, apples, whatever), but you can buy as much or as little of whatever you can.

HockaLouis 01-29-2012 06:42 PM

May I Share a Simple Approach I Developed For Newbies?
 
If I may...

Buy 19 cases of Textured Vegetable Protein for just one person ($1,100?). You will also need one, or some proportional mixture, of (preferably in this order for best nutrition) 243 lbs. of assorted dry beans ($435?), 647 lbs. of pasta ($620?) or 228 lbs. of parboiled rice ($180?), with that TVP. On top of that you will need 16 liters (five or six big 3-liter cans, $75?) of Olive (or other) oil to add two tablespoons of to each meal. This scenario will actually provide 2,500 calories of perfectly balanced nutrition meals per day and will sustain a man well.

Get balanced nutrition calories from someplace else? Buy less of the above. Add a multivitamin per day plus a Vitamin-C wafer in Winter.

Try to buy all these when they're on sale of course.

I like Honeyville Grain for TVP, but there are others. This stuff, except the oil, will last a couple of decades if you keep the vermin away.

fireguy 01-30-2012 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HockaLouis (Post 693075)
If I may...

Buy 19 cases of Textured Vegetable Protein for just one person ($1,100?). You will also need one, or some proportional mixture, of (preferably in this order for best nutrition) 243 lbs. of assorted dry beans ($435?), 647 lbs. of pasta ($620?) or 228 lbs. of parboiled rice ($180?), with that TVP. On top of that you will need 16 liters (five or six big 3-liter cans, $75?) of Olive (or other) oil to add two tablespoons of to each meal. This scenario will actually provide 2,500 calories of perfectly balanced nutrition meals per day and will sustain a man well.

Get balanced nutrition calories from someplace else? Buy less of the above. Add a multivitamin per day plus a Vitamin-C wafer in Winter.

Try to buy all these when they're on sale of course.

I like Honeyville Grain for TVP, but there are others. This stuff, except the oil, will last a couple of decades if you keep the vermin away.

While TVP is a decent replacement for protein, namely as a meat substitute there is a lot of data that makes me want to use it sparingly. Don't take me wrong, I have some in various flavors, but TVP is not going to be a major part of my diet if I need to get into the LTS food.

The first thing that makes me unwilling to use a lot of this product is that TVP [B]may[B] upset hormonal balances by increasing estrogen in the person eating it. The jury is decidedly still out on this, but I am wary.

Second is the fact that DuPont is now the predominant supplier of this product. Most assuredly using genetically modified soy, I am not sure if it is what I want to ingest.

And lastly, the regular forms of legumes I like, white, black, pinto, navy, etc., eaten in combination with rice or the consumption of quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) will give the body a complete protein that is easily digestible and a usual food source for me and my family. It is only in very dire times that a food that is foreign or suspect will make it to my family's plate.

I will use limited amounts of chicken, beef, and bacon TVP as food stretchers in rice or noodle dishes. The bacon TVP makes a very good scrambled egg mixed with dehydrated whole eggs and cooked in a pan.
Take a look at this three part article and do some searching on your own to make the decision that is right for you. It may not be a deal breaker for many people, as it is not for me, but I do use and will use it with reluctance and in moderation.
http://www.savvyvegetarian.com/articles/textured-vegetable-protein.php

HockaLouis 01-31-2012 12:13 AM

Fireguy;
Interesting, thanks. There appears to remain, however, a previously mentioned shortcoming in the diet you outlined. I wonder if perhaps you are a vegetarian?

The problem with your combination of legumes with quinoa or especially white rice seems to be that it cannot ever provide the amount of protein one needs. Some of those ingredients have more protein than others but none alone provides the proportion of calories healthy humans need from proteins. Accordingly, they can't do so when diluted in combination with other similarly carbohydrate-dominated foodstuffs. Equal servings of White Beans with the rice or trendy faux-grain provide only 15-18% of the calories, about half what we need, as protein.

As for TVP, I am in touch with my feminine side but not overly concerned with the 'evil' DuPont (nor ADM or Monsanto, etc.) trademarked products yet re: preps (other than for heirloom seeds).

Don't misunderstand me, I appreciate your concoction... But mainly as a sidedish under a pat of sweet butter next to a necessary and reasonably lean steak.

;)

partdeux 01-31-2012 12:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bkt (Post 692789)
You don't need to be a Mormon to do it. You can't just buy canned stuff there;

I had heard, but not substantiated. they were now limiting it to church members only.


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