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-   -   Almost Forgotten Skills (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f51/almost-forgotten-skills-69731/)

TekGreg 08-06-2012 04:43 AM

Oh, also from the list of surnames:

Fletcher - mounted the feathers on the back of arrows expertly and sometimes made arrows.

Boyer - a maker of bows (but surprisingly not the arrows)

Potter - clay pots, anyone?

Mason - a stone cutter and engineer.

Tailor - A professional at fitting clothes.

Hatter - maker and fitter of hats. These will become very important as heaters and air conditioning go away and we spend much more time outdoors.

texaswoodworker 08-06-2012 05:49 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by TLuker (Post 894442)
I've got most of the basic skills like hunting and farming. I'm referring to skills like texaswoodworker mentioned, woodworking without power tools and blacksmithing. Just to expand on that, how many could make a hand plain to use for wood working without power tools or pedal powered lath?

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 894480)
Yep- I can (and have) made a plane for woodworking, starting with forging the iron- to see if I could. And have made wood chisels (#4 rebar, forge, 2 lb hammer) and a spring pole lathe. Worked suprisingly well.

I have never made a hand plane before (haven't gotten around to it yet), but I have seen how their made. It is not too difficult. I would recommend making one before TEOTWAWKI, because making a good quality plane by hand is a little more difficult than doing it with power tools.

This video give you a pretty good idea about how it's done.


Here's what I use. :)

Stanley No. 5 jack plane that I restored.

I also have a Stanley No. 4 bench plane and a Shelton No. 05 jack plane (I don't have any pics). They usually get the job done. ;)

texaswoodworker 08-06-2012 05:52 AM

Another good thing to know is how to cast metal parts. Look up some of the stuff about backyard foundries. It would also be a good idea to learn how to carve wood so you can make molds too.

hiwall 08-06-2012 01:23 PM

things won't be quite like the 1800's. for many many years there will be scavengers- people who find and make useful items out of all the stuff around us. Some places will have electric power for many years as the hydro-electric plants will keep producing electricity for years to come(mechanics and electricians needed). For awhile wild game populations will drop(I think) but when they return hunters and trappers would be needed.

bkt 08-06-2012 11:04 PM

This is a great thread and there are some good suggestions. A site I found might give some folks some help or ideas: http://www.saveourskills.com/

Seems pretty cool.

Tackleberry1 08-06-2012 11:26 PM

Beyond immediate survival skills the next most important skills will belong to those who can reestablish power and sanitation. Which is one reason I work for a commercial electrician and have many friends who are plumbers.

Tack

downsouth 08-06-2012 11:34 PM

Tack hit on something about sanitation. Human waste piles up quick and can make a bad situation MUCH WORSE if not handled properly. Pest, disease, contamination, all manner of problems fast. A slip trench in the proper location and lime go a long way in this matter.

srtolly1 08-07-2012 12:00 AM

As they say, knowledge is power. We grow some veggies and spices. Plant identification will be a necessary skill for food and medicine. Then knowing how to process it into other things like wheat into flour, corn into corn meal, oats into oatmeal...

I have made several tools out of necessity. Learning gunsmithing and blacksmithing.

TLuker 08-07-2012 01:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hiwall (Post 894715)
things won't be quite like the 1800's. for many many years there will be scavengers- people who find and make useful items out of all the stuff around us. Some places will have electric power for many years as the hydro-electric plants will keep producing electricity for years to come(mechanics and electricians needed). For awhile wild game populations will drop(I think) but when they return hunters and trappers would be needed.

I agree with your point and I realize that it isn't really practical to make a lot of things. I could theoretically get enough black sand from a creek and make a knife from it. And of course I would have to make several to eventually make a decent one. Or I could just go down to the store and buy a good knife that would last me a life time.

But there is something that has just been driving me nuts lately, and that's how disposable everything is becoming. It seems like every time I turn around I'm having to run to the store and buy a replacement something. Not too long ago you bought something and if it broke you bought a new part and fixed it. Now you're going to break 5 more plastic parts just getting to the part you need to replace. That drives me nuts on so many levels and for so many reasons.

The alternative is to buy older products, and the hand planes that texaswoodworker mentioned are the perfect example. You can buy older products like that Stanley No. 5, add a few spare parts, and then you're good to go for a long time. The problem is if you run out of those spare parts. That No.5 has will always need blades. Not very often but it will need them and they will need to be the right size and so on. The further back you go the simpler tools become and the easier they are to repair/maintain/make.

I figure start around the colonial period with the most basic tools and skills then work my way forward. I can figure out what works best along the way. Besides it's fun using and learning about old tools, and its fun getting the occasional surprise. I got an old style planter's hoe this year. I was stunned at how much better it works than new styles hows. Now I just have to figure out which trades I want to learn more about and try my hand at.

And on a side note, I do a lot of metal detecting and relic hunting, and all of this just fits right in with that. The reason I got a planter's hoe to try is because I found so many metal detecting. After researching them I learned they go all of the way back to the colonial period. That's pretty much the style hoe everyone hear used up until the 20th century. Now I know why they used that style for well over 100 years. It is vastly superior to a normal how. :)

c3shooter 08-07-2012 02:25 AM

Go to Amazon, get a copy of Old Ways of Working Wood. Will run you about $5 including shipping.


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