You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of FirearmsTalk.com!    
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Firearms Forums > Hunting Forum >

Texas OKs Poisoning Of Wild Hogs


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-24-2017, 04:21 PM   #171
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: SW OK
Posts: 5,928
Liked 3441 Times on 1898 Posts
Likes Given: 5206

Default

My property is all hunting land. Several times i've given people permission to hunt with the understand that the permission does not extend to his friends. Twice i've caught the hunter who has permission and his buddies hunting on the property. One time there was a stranger hunting on my property who said he was granted permission to hunt there by the person i talked to. When this stuff happens the permission to hunt gets revoked and the gate keys changed.

i also expect a call when the person goes hunting on my property.





i am very lucky to have permission to hunt several large farms/ranches in OK and TX. i hunt alone except for a couple times per year with my son and grand kids.
alsaqr is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2017, 10:19 PM   #172
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Dallas53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Piney Woods of Central East Texas
Posts: 4,318
Liked 5162 Times on 2949 Posts
Likes Given: 8577

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alsaqr View Post
My property is all hunting land. Several times i've given people permission to hunt with the understand that the permission does not extend to his friends. Twice i've caught the hunter who has permission and his buddies hunting on the property. One time there was a stranger hunting on my property who said he was granted permission to hunt there by the person i talked to. When this stuff happens the permission to hunt gets revoked and the gate keys changed.

i also expect a call when the person goes hunting on my property.





i am very lucky to have permission to hunt several large farms/ranches in OK and TX. i hunt alone except for a couple times per year with my son and grand kids.
i fully understand. i have been burned a couple of times, and i ain't going to let it happen again.

the damage the hogs do to the land seems less than what the "hunters" do!
__________________
"Blue Lives Matter"
Following The Rule Of Law, Oppose Sanctuary Cities, And Those Who Support Them.
NRA Member and Supporter. Join The NRA Today!
"the hate which we all bear with the most Christian patience, is the hate of those who envy us."
Dallas53 is offline  
kfox75 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2017, 11:13 PM   #173
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kfox75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Wrong side of the tracks, Erie PA,
Posts: 6,730
Liked 6043 Times on 3556 Posts
Likes Given: 30370

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas53 View Post
i fully understand. i have been burned a couple of times, and i ain't going to let it happen again.

the damage the hogs do to the land seems less than what the "hunters" do!
When i first started hunting with my dad in NC, he taught me the lesons that he learned from his dad from day one. Among those lessons were:

1. leave it as you found it. Even when I'm camping on a hunting trip over a few days, I do things like using dead falls for firewood, and I tread as lightly as I can. TYhe only thing I leave changed is where I scrape leaves from around a tree to move silently if I need to manuver for a shot at a game animal.

2. If you can carry it in, it's lighter on the way out, so make sure you take it with you. This extends to any trash i find in my area, and I keep a small trash bag with me for just that reason. I keep a second one for the heart and liver of any big game animal I shoot, and I tend to keep the gut piles contained to as small an area as I can, as a sign of respect to the land owner. After all, not all of the place I hunt are owned by hunters, so I try to make sure they don't come upon my leavings in that case. I also don't gut near the house or land in common use by the owner for the same reason.

3. i don't take my game out in a public manner. just because I have no objection to seeing the kill, even if it's got some blood pooled around it, or on it's hide, doesn't mean the owner's wife or kids need to see it. Under the cap or the bed covering is the polite and smart way to do it, especially if you like hunting there, and want to come back. If they ask to see what you got, keep it as clean as you can, and show it to them.

4. Never assume. Ask permission before the season starts each year. It shows respect to the land owner, and tends yo go a long way towards you getting a yes instead of a no.

5. Offer your time to help with projects around the property, and if you see something damaged by someone else, report it, location and what the damage is, in a timely manner to the property owner. Offer to help them, by fixing it if it's in your skill set to do so. If not, offer to help them, so you can learn how incase you see it in the future.

One of the places I junted in NY, I would come up during the summer to help them hay, mend the fences, and to move grain and hay into the barns for storage. I also would come up and help clean stalls, usually in the clothes I keep aside for hunting season, as most of where I hunted was on the edge of the pasture land. On the way in, I would walk through the barns, visit with the horses and cows, and make ure I stepping in the manure on the floor. Made a great cover scent, and it showed the owner that I cared for her horses as much as she did. When hay needed moving from onr barn to the other in the winter, i'd go up with the K2500 and the trailer, and help move it. If it snowed, I'd plow the driveway for them when i got there.

As a result, I had a free, except for sweat equity, hunting lease for over a decade. when I saw on one of my trips up during the season that a tree had fallen on part of the fence, and that was where the horses kept getting out, I dropped off my wife to hunt, e=went home to pick uo the 4 wheeler, trailer, and chainsaws and gear, hitched it to the F150, and drove back up. When I got there, I off loded the 4 wheeler trailer, ;loaded up my food and drinks, the saw, and the rest of the gear for it, and rode down into the pasture to cut the tree, and put the fencing back in place. They came home halfway through it, then came down with their equipment, and joined in. I guess I missed one hell of a good day to hunt, as my wife filled her antlered bow tag, and passed up on a few large does, but it was worth it to keep the lease.

On the previous three trips to transfer hay, I had to drive down the road, catch up to one of the horses with a bridle, and call them over, or load the trailer with a few bales, and intercept them to lead them back. I can't say I ever saw what that looked like, but it was interesting to drive down the road with the 4 ways on, and the roof beacon going, with a horse walking along the side of the truck, and 9 or so more follwing. Or even to have three of them racing after the truck to get the hay in the bed, and the rest following them. Good times.

6. If the gate is closed when you get there and go in, or when you come out, close it after you go through it. Simple really, but so many seem to forget this, and as fun as round ups can be, seeing a car or truck going 55 MPH, heading straifht for one of the horses or other livestock, is a scary sight.

7. the property is not a off road park. Don't tear up the pastures, if you get stuck, send for the farmer and a tractor, and keep recovery gear that you know how to use properly, in your truck when you go off road. Don't assume you have permission, ASK the land owner first.

8. If there is a nusance animal running around the property, or several of them, help the land owner out by helping to reduce their numbers in a safe manner. We had a coyote problem (3 dens on a 400 acre parcel, with 30 + coyotes per den.) so there was a shoot on sight order there, as it had gotten to the point they were going after the pets, livestock, and the small kids on the property. DEC wouldn't step in or set traps, and told them to deal with it them self, so we did. Some of the kids there were like my own, so I took part in the droping of their numbers as well.

I guess what it all boils down to is, treat the land as well as, or better, than the landowner does. Respect is earned by showing the respect you wish to have granted to you in return.
__________________
Guns don't kill people. Blood loss and organ failure do.

I may live in the North, but I still uphold the Southern Values I was raised with.

lifetime member. NAHC, NRA, And SCOPE NY

If it's a nice enough day to wash the bike, it's d@mn well also a nice enough day to be riding it instead.
kfox75 is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2017, 06:20 PM   #174
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Dallas53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Piney Woods of Central East Texas
Posts: 4,318
Liked 5162 Times on 2949 Posts
Likes Given: 8577

Default

you would be surprised at how many people treat a lease or land they have permission to hunt on a their own personal playground.

and because of this, many landowners are prohibiting the hunting on their land. personally, i don't blame them. and it stems usually from the actions of few jack wagons, that mess it up for the caring and responsible hunters.

as landowner myself, i don't want, need or will i abide by a bunch of trashy hunters being on my land. i'd rather deal with the hogs that i do get in my own way.

again it comes down to respect, manners and common courtesy. something that seems to be lacking in some people.
__________________
"Blue Lives Matter"
Following The Rule Of Law, Oppose Sanctuary Cities, And Those Who Support Them.
NRA Member and Supporter. Join The NRA Today!
"the hate which we all bear with the most Christian patience, is the hate of those who envy us."
Dallas53 is offline  
kfox75 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2017, 09:04 AM   #175
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
kfox75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Wrong side of the tracks, Erie PA,
Posts: 6,730
Liked 6043 Times on 3556 Posts
Likes Given: 30370

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas53 View Post
you would be surprised at how many people treat a lease or land they have permission to hunt on a their own personal playground.

and because of this, many landowners are prohibiting the hunting on their land. personally, i don't blame them. and it stems usually from the actions of few jack wagons, that mess it up for the caring and responsible hunters.

as landowner myself, i don't want, need or will i abide by a bunch of trashy hunters being on my land. i'd rather deal with the hogs that i do get in my own way.

again it comes down to respect, manners and common courtesy. something that seems to be lacking in some people.
Actually, i wouldn't be. Some of my leases back in NY took a few years of coming up and lending a hand on the property before I got to hunt there. in two of those cases, i was pretty much adopted into the family before I got permission to hunt there. With the one, i can tell you the single action that got my permission to pretty much use the land as I would my own, due to having respect for it, and it's owners.

i had one of the sons there ask me to come up and heip pull his part's truck down to the house so he could pull the engine and some other parts for his other truck out of it, so i said yes, I'll be up in about an hour. On the way up, i noticed that my lights weren't working right, and I knew the headlight switch was going bad, so I figured I'd ask him about the one in the parts truck when I got there.

We drove up though the cattle yard gate, and started up the hill, after I put in 4WD and locked the hubs fpor the trip up, as it had rained the night before. Halfway up the hill, I heard a banging under the bed, and was soon stuck. Looked under the truck, and I had dropped the driveshaft. he said no problem, we'll pull the one up there, and swap it out, and keep going.

in the time the truck sat, both the front and back wheels sank in to the point it was not going to come out. He said put it back in 4HI, and gp for it, and I looked at him and said " no. I'll go get the Super C."

It was after we had pulled mine out, I had driven the tractor up the hill, and he followed with the truck, as I had a winch on it that would pull his F150 out, and we decided to tug it the rest of the way, with his younger sister in the towed truck's cab to steer and brake, and took it down the hill to the house and shop, that he told his mom and dad that i had insisted on getting the tractor to pull the truck out, instead of tearing up part of the pasture.

this even after he and the rest of us had used the other side of the field there as a freestyle area while playing with the 4WDs before hitting the logging trail 2 weeks earlier (Some areas were set aside as play zones for the adult toys, as they were on the other side of the ravine the horses and cows didn't cross.) because I had been coming up for 2 years, and had helped out with wood cutting, splitting, haying, and stall cleanings, and had shown nothing but the utmost respect of them and their land, as well as their livestock, that I was granted permission to come up and hunt, hike, trail ride, or camp on the land, as long as I stopped in at some point to let them know I was up, called and left a voicemail, or called them at home, so if something happened, they'd know where to look to find me.

As others have said on here, you have to give respect to earn respect.

We lost his dad 2 years later, and he and I were close enough that it felt like it was my own dad in that casket that winter day.
__________________
Guns don't kill people. Blood loss and organ failure do.

I may live in the North, but I still uphold the Southern Values I was raised with.

lifetime member. NAHC, NRA, And SCOPE NY

If it's a nice enough day to wash the bike, it's d@mn well also a nice enough day to be riding it instead.
kfox75 is offline  
Dallas53 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2017, 07:38 PM   #176
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hairbear1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Molong,NSW Australia
Posts: 955
Liked 955 Times on 455 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

We leave gates as we find them unless the farmer says otherwise, let the farmer know if there's a fence down or stock in trouble or there's something like water leaking from 1 of his troughs or dams if we can't do anything about it.

We tell him what we've shot or seen and this sort of stuff scores big Brownie points with them as they can't be everywhere at once and this sort of info can save them a lot of time and money especially if there's signs of somebody cutting fences to poach,steal stock or damage/steal equipment..

Word of mouth gets around with most farmers and if you screw up word gets around quick enough especially in a small rural town like I live in.

To put it plainly your in somebody's backyard and would you like it if some dumb **** came in and started leaving rubbish around, leave a fire still burning and generally making a mess?

Treat the paddocks as your own backyard and you won't have too many problems
__________________
The ability to think and speak doesn't necessarily guarantee intelligence
hairbear1 is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2017, 08:47 PM   #177
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hairbear1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Molong,NSW Australia
Posts: 955
Liked 955 Times on 455 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

Back to the original post....................pigs here in Australia are shot, poisoned, dogged and they are still a very pig problem..............good for we hunters but generally bad for primary producers and the land as they foul drinking water, root up paddocks, kill young lambs, cause erosion and destroy fences and crops.

It's estimated that there are around 23-24 million pigs in Australia basically 1 pig per person and given the high birth rate that feral pigs have and allowing for say in a litter of 8 pigs 50% might not survive due to predation and shooting etc the 4 left can start breeding from around 6 months old.

The whole thing starts again and in places like our National Parks where hunting isn't allowed but critters like dogs, cats, goats, pigs, rabbits, foxes etc can safely breed it's no wonder we do have major problems with things like pigs and so Texas will be in the same boat.

You'll never wipe them out completely but they can be bought under control providing everybody is on the same page.

Wild pigs carry many diseases that can be contracted to humans, dogs and domestic pigs. Swine brucellosis, pseudorabies(http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw388) and parasitic diseases are the most serious diseases carried by feral pigs.

Human health can be affected by: leptospirosis, through contact with the urine of affected feral pigs. porcine brucellosis, through handling raw feral pig meat. tuberculosis and sparganosis, through eating inadequately cooked feral pig meat.

Now I see that in the US you boys do eat wild pig and so do we here in Australia BUT here in Australia any pig that has been in drought conditions and has been eating anything and everything and stinks badly gets left to rot and God knows what nasty's they're carrying from eating carrion.
Pigs that have been on the wheat or around orchards and eating grass etc generally aren't to bad and as long as they're prepped and cooked properly aren't a worry.
Personally I just drop them and move onto the next 1 as I have better things to do than cop some nasty little bug or virus from eating something that hasn't exactly been eating good tucker.
A lot of blokes catch the suckers take them home, drench, feed them up on grain etc and then shove them on the spit with good results.
__________________
The ability to think and speak doesn't necessarily guarantee intelligence
hairbear1 is offline  
5
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2017, 11:18 PM   #178
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,149
Liked 1132 Times on 694 Posts
Likes Given: 1609

Default

Might consider if not a chance of starting a brush fire, burning questionable feral hogs. Whatever eats them just spreads the diseases.
They all don't die until the elements have time to work over the entire mass, if then.
I haven't done that to deer etc around this part of the Country because it was usually very to brutally cold especially at night but weather has been very mild these last few years.
I'm not in favor, as per previous posts, of indiscriminate poisons.
I'm in favor of hunting and have asked several to kill the coyote pack here.
Anyone does stupid stuff is going to leave in a hurry.
I can handle the problem of stupid conduct.
tinbucket is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
The Wild wild west tinbucket Hunting Forum 2 04-10-2016 07:44 PM
OK Man Charged With Releasing Hogs Into The Wild alsaqr Hunting Forum 26 03-19-2015 04:44 PM
wild life acting.... wild? trip286 The Club House 9 10-11-2011 08:41 PM
Hogs Gone Wild locnload Hunting Forum 44 08-08-2011 11:55 PM