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Old 11-17-2009, 10:02 PM   #41
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Default Phez Chowdah

PHEASANT CHOWDAH

Ingredients
1 medium onion chopped
One quarter-cup butter
One quarter-cup all purpose flour
One half-teaspoon seasoned salt
One quarter-teaspoon ground pepper
3 cups chicken broth
5 medium cucumbers, about 2 pounds, peeled and speared (I remove the seeds)
2 cups cubed boiled pheasant breastes meat
One-half cup long grain rice plus the same amount of wild rice
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 bay leaves
1 cup light cream
One-quarter cup cut cilantro

DIRECTIONS
In 3-quart saucepan, cook onion in butter until tender not brown. Blend in flour, seasoned salt and ground pepper. Stir in chicken broth. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Add cucumbers, cover and simmer for 10 minutes

Pour half the mixture at a time into blender container. Cover and blend on medium speed for 30 seconds. Return all to saucepan.

Stir in pheasant, uncooked rice, lemon juice and bay leaves. Return to boiling. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes or until rice is tender. Remove bay leaves. Stir in cream and celantro, heat through.

Season to taste(add a splash of tabasco for some zip) Garnish with fresh cilantro
oystah crackers optional

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Last edited by markerdown; 11-17-2009 at 10:07 PM.
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Old 11-17-2009, 11:30 PM   #42
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Sounds really good Marker! It's going in my recipe book. Thanks!

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Old 11-18-2009, 11:27 PM   #43
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Default Plain and easy Venison Steaks(Schniztzel)

1 Venison backstrap, cut into 3/4 inch thick slices
2 cups all purpouse flour
Salt and Coarse Ground Black Pepper to taste
1 TBS onion powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1 ground bay leaf
2 fresh eggs, beaten
2 TBS whole milk
1 cup oil for frying

Take a meat mallet and pound the backstrap down to about a 1/8 inch thick, season with salt and pepper. Mix Flour, onion powder, garlic powder,and ground bay together. Whisk milk and egg together. Dredge steaks through dry mixture, both sides, and allow to stand at least 2 minutes. Dip steaks into egg mixture to coat both sides, and dredge in dry mix again. Let stand for a minute and fry in hot oil till crisp. Goes well with mashed spuds and green beans.

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Old 11-19-2009, 01:00 AM   #44
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Default Phez On The Gruill

Since my 3 yr old GSP has finally turned into a bird machine, we've been knocking the heck out of phez in southern UT. The results is we get to enjoy all my old phez recipes.

This also works on quail, dove , chukker, etc. They are just fun appetizers, and can be addictive

Phez Poppers

I like the spicy stuff, so here is a simple reciepe for phez on the grill

Use the juice from jarred jalapenos and place in a bowl, add some olive oil and seasoning of choice (just enough to cover the meat). I use garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepperor season all. Plus one cold beer set off to the side in the frige

Cut pheasant in bite sized pieces and place in bowl to marinate for 20-30 minutes. Take some thin slice bacon, you can pre-cook it not all the way it still needs to be flexible enough to wrap around pheasant. If you don't like the bacon crispy you can skip this part.

After pheasant is marinated, take some jalapenos from jar, drain somewhat, put one slice of jalapeno on each side of pheasant breast and wrap with bacon. Hold together with toothpicks that were pre-soaked in water. ( I just soak them in the jalapeno juice) You can use fresh jalapenos if you like, they will be slightly hotter.

On grill medium heat 10-20 min. you can see when the meat is done. Don't over cook. The olive oil and bacon keep the meat real moist and tender. Take one off the grill to sample, open the cold beer you had in the frige , and enjoy


Another way to do these is get fresh jalapenos, slice them on one side to get seeds out then stuff with cream cheese (room temperature) and if desired bacon bits and shredded cheese of choice. Take pheasant, marinated in same mix as above and wrap around the jalapeno then wrap with bacon again toothpicks to hold together.

The only thing I do different here is I slice the pheasant thin and bigger than bite sized to cover most of the jalapeno.

Be careful cleaning the seeds out of the jalapenos; they can burn your hands and if you wash your hands but miss some of the oil under fingers, you rub your eyes, it's gonna burn, use food handlers gloves.

Also you can cut the jalapenos in half cleaning is easier but the cream cheese tends to ooze out more. I take the fresh jalapenos and boil them for 2-3 minutes after cleaning them and rinse in cold water immediately after. They seem to cook up faster by doing this.

Use same grill method as listed above, and get another beer or three

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Old 11-28-2009, 11:23 PM   #45
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This is very good and works on pork or chicken and I bet would work on wild game as well.......

Maple bourbon brined pork or chicken.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes for chops, 1 hour for roast

Serves 4

This recipe is courtesy of Raley's.

Note: The prep time does not include the brining time.

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup boiling water

3 tablespoons kosher salt or 2 tablespoons non-iodized salt

4 cups water

1/2 cup pure maple syrup
1/2 cup bourbon

1 teaspoon coarse pepper

4 cloves fresh garlic, smashed

Leaves from 2 large stems fresh rosemary

4 pork loin chops or a 2-pound boneless pork roast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Chopped fresh rosemary (optional)

Maple syrup and white balsamic vinegar (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

Pour boiling water over salt and stir to dissolve; let cool. Place a gallon-size resealable plastic bag in a large bowl to keep it upright. Place salt water, water, syrup, bourbon, pepper, garlic and rosemary leaves in bag. Add pork and seal bag. Refrigerate 12 to 24 hours for pork chops, and 2 days for a pork loin roast. Remove pork from brine and rinse well; pat dry.

To cook chops, heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chops and cook for 4 minutes. Carefully lift one edge to see if chops are golden brown on the bottom. If so, turn and cook for 4 minutes more.

Reduce heat to low and tent skillet with foil. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes more, turning once, or until pork reaches 160 degrees internal temperature using a meat thermometer.
Remove to a platter or plates. Sprinkle with rosemary and drizzle with equal parts of maple syrup and white balsamic vinegar, if you like.

To cook roast, preheat oven to 350 degrees, place roast in roasting pan and cook for about an hour or until pork reaches 160 degrees internal temperature using a meat thermometer.

(The Raley's recipe calls for the meat to be cooked to an internal temperature of 145 degrees. The USDA recommends pork of any type be cooked to 160 degrees.)

Per serving based on 4 pork loin chops: 502 cal.; 65 g pro.; 3 g carb.; 23 g fat (9 sat., 11 monounsat., 3 polyunsat.); 193 mg chol.; 870 mg sod.; 0 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 43 percent calories from fat.

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Old 11-29-2009, 02:38 PM   #46
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There is a local fare here that is incredibly popular. It is called a Spiedie. It was originally made at a local Italian restauraunt out of veal but now pork or chicken are the popular meats of choice. However, I have found that venison is a great meat to use.
Now, locally there are different shops that offer their signature spiedie marinade. I know you folks cant get it unless you want to do an internet search. If you Google Lupos spiedie marinade, you will get a website where you can order a good marinade. Another is Salmidas New York State Spiedie sauce.
You can substitute at home using some common grocery store items.
The easiest way to make your own marinade at home is get the good seasons italian dressing seasoning packet and make the dressing according to direction (Use Olive Oil!!!)
Once made add in an additional cup of vinagar (I like to use a 50/50 mix of red wine and balsamic vinegar).
Then I add in 1/2 cup of additional Olive Oil.
Mince 1 whole garlic and add to marinade.
Add 2 tablespoons of onion powder.
Add 2 tsp of black pepper.
Add 1 tsp of salt.
Add 1 tablespoon of oregano.
Add 2 tablespoons of Italian seasoning.
Mix all ingredients thouroughly!!

Cut venison into cubes and put in a large sealable container. Pour marinade over meat and let soak for 24 hours (Turn the meat and marinade 1/2 way through the soaking to evenly marinate meat). Once done, place meat on kabob skewers and cook on grill. A real wood fire is best, charcoal is good, gas is okay if that is what you have. You can pan fry if you like but they do not come out as good as they do grilled.
To be a local favorite you would serve arranged like a hot dog on a good warm slice of Italian bread.
You can choose to serve like a hoagie with lettuce, tomatoes, and onions. Some like to put it on a baguette and put carmelized onions on it, others like to serve it over a wild rice of some sort with a side of mixed vegetables.

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Old 01-10-2010, 12:22 PM   #47
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Default Buttermilk Squirrel Pie

2- squirrels, cut up
1 can mixed vegetables
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 tsp salt or to taste
1/2 tsp coarse ground black pepper
1/2 tsp thyme

Boil squirrels in salted water and remove meat from bones. Add meat to other ingredients and place in an oven safe baking dish. This works well with older squirrels that are a little tough for frying.

1 cup buttermilk
1 stick butter or margarine, melted
1 cup self rising flour

Mix ingredients and pour over the top of the squirrel mixture, bake in oven at 375 degrees for 30-45 mins.

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Old 03-12-2010, 11:14 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lonyaeger View Post
I guess at my age, if I haven't eaten beaver, I probably never will.
...Too many jokes to be made out of that statement.
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Old 03-12-2010, 11:34 PM   #49
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Default Venison Pad Thai

This recipe for Pad Thai noodles is both authentic and easy. The pad Thai sauce is simple to make; in fact, while you're at it, double or triple the sauce recipe and keep the extra in your refrigerator for future pad thai noodle dishes. Aside from getting the sauce right, the secret to great pad thai is all in the noodles. Be sure to soak them in hot water (never boil them) before stir-frying - that way you'll have perfectly chewy (and slightly sticky) pad thai that is simply wonderful.


Ingredients:

8 oz. Thai rice noodles (linguini width), or enough for 2 people
8 oz. thinly sliced venison (backstrap) meat
1 shallot (OR 1/4 cup purple onion), finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1-2 fresh red chilies, finely sliced
1 egg
2-3 cups bean sprouts
1/8 tsp. ground white pepper (OR substitute black pepper)
3 green onions, sliced finely
1/2 cup fresh coriander/cilantro
1/4 cup dry roasted peanuts, ground or chopped
2-3 Tbsp. oil for stir-frying
3 Tbsp. chicken stock
wedges of lime for serving

PAD THAI SAUCE: (*If making more than 8 oz. noodles, see tip below)
3/4 Tbsp. tamarind paste (available at Asian/Indian food stores)
1/4 cup hot water
2+1/2 Tbsp. fish sauce (available in tall bottles at Asian food stores)
1-3 tsp. chili sauce (to taste), OR 1/2 to 1 tsp. dried crushed chili
3 Tbsp. brown sugar

Preparation:
Bring a large pot of water to boil, then remove from heat. Dunk in the rice noodles. Soak (do not boil) the noodles until soft enough to eat, but still firm and a little "crunchy". Drain and rinse the noodles thoroughly with cold water. Set aside.

In a small bowl or cup, dissolve the tamarind paste in the hot water. Then add the other sauce ingredients, stirring well. (Add as much or as little chili sauce as you prefer, but don't skimp on the sugar - it is needed to balance out the sourness of the tamarind.) Set aside.

Warm a wok or large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add 2 Tbsp. oil, then add the shallots, garlic, and chili. Stir-fry 1 minute.
Add the venison slices plus 2-3 Tbsp. chicken stock. Stir-fry 2-3 minutes, or until venison is cooked to about medium.
Push ingredients aside, making room in the center of your wok/pan. Add another 1 Tbsp. oil, then crack in the egg. Stir-fry to scramble (30 seconds to 1 minute).
Add the drained noodles and drizzle over the pad thai sauce. Use 2 utensils and a gentle "tossing" motion to stir-fry everything together (like tossing a salad). Keep the heat between medium and medium-high - you want your pan hot enough to cook the noodles, but not so hot that the bottom of your pan burns.
Stir-fry 4-6 minutes, or until noodles are chewy-delicious and a little bit sticky.
Remove from heat and taste-test, adding more fish sauce until desired taste is achieved (I usually add another 1-2 Tbsp., but I like mine a little salty).
Sprinkle over the green onion, coriander, and peanuts, and garnish with lime wedges (these should be squeezed over before eating). Thai chili sauce can also be served on the side for those who like it extra spicy. ENJOY!

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Old 03-13-2010, 12:13 AM   #50
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Default Super Easy Stroganoff

1 1/2 to 2 pounds (venison steak, rabbitt, dark meat bird, or whatever you got) cut in 1/2-3/4 inch cubes
3 tbsp unsalted butter
3-4 cloves fresh garlic (crushed)
1 1/2 tsp fresh ground sea salt
1/2 tsp coarse ground black pepper
1/4 tsp coarse ground cayenne pepper (chipotle if you want smokey flavor)
1/4 tsp fine ground white pepper
2 cans (24 oz) low sodium beef stock. (chicken if using bird meat)
1 can (4 oz) sliced or whole mushrooms, drained
2 cups sour cream

2 tbsp corn starch
2 tbsp flour
1/2 cup cold water

Preparation:
Melt 2 tbsp butter in a large skillet over medium heat; brown meat cubes for about 10 to 15 minutes with about half of the garlic, turning frequently. Add salt, pepper, remaining garlic and beef stock. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes, or until fork tender. Remove meat and stock from skillet. Add remaining tbsp of butter to empty skillet, add drained mushrooms and saute for about 5 minutes; stir in meat and stock. Gradually stir in sour cream. Heat and stir until thickened -- DO NOT BOIL, THIS WILL MAKE THE MEAT TOUGH. If mixture does not thicken to gravy like consistency, mix 1/2 cup cold water with corn starch and flour in glass and gradually add and whisk 1 tbsp at a time to skillet until desired thickness is achieved. Serve over a bed of cooked egg noodles. Sourdough bread complements the sauce quite well. Serves 6 to 8.

Enjoy

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