Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   NFA/Class 3 & FFL Discussion (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f47/)
-   -   thinking of starting my own business (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f47/thinking-starting-my-own-business-90051/)

Ultimate_sig 05-04-2013 01:25 AM

thinking of starting my own business
 
Im thinking of getting my FFL and my class 3 to start my own business and um curious....

Is it difficult to operate a small lathe with no experience?

Im thinking of building or rather creating a new sound suppressor system. I will spend quit a but of time as R&D but eventually I will have a product to sell.

My second ? Is would a small table top lathe work for what I want, perhaps a grizzly model?

hiwall 05-04-2013 01:56 AM

Quote:

Is it difficult to operate a small lathe with no experience?
Yes it is.

Olympus 05-04-2013 02:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ultimate_sig (Post 1235829)
Im thinking of getting my FFL and my class 3 to start my own business and um curious....

Is it difficult to operate a small lathe with no experience?

Im thinking of building or rather creating a new sound suppressor system. I will spend quit a but of time as R&D but eventually I will have a product to sell.

My second ? Is would a small table top lathe work for what I want, perhaps a grizzly model?

You've got several fairly large obstacles to conquer in this scenario.

1. Simply getting a FFL is no small feat. You may look into the process and realize that you'll never be able to get your license due to zoning restrictions, etc.

2. You're wanting to produce a product in which you have little to know experience producing or possibly even knowledge of the subtleties of operations. I predict you'll spend a HUGE amount of money in wasted time and materials simply trying to design something from scratch using machinery that you have no experience using.

3. Unless you're using CNC maching, your production as a one-man shop using one small bench top lathe will be extremely low. The chances of you selling enough finished products to recoup all the money wasted during "R&D" are very slim and would probably take years.

4. People are machinists by trade. It is definitely not impossible to teach yourself, but you're talking a significant time investment just to learn how to properly operate a lathe and to calculate measurements in fractions you didn't even know existed before.

5. And provided that you're able to conquer all the above hurdles, you'll still be a small shop with relatively low production, so you'll constantly have to keep marketing your business so you're not forgotten about.

I don't mean to discourage you, I'm just trying to be realistic with you. I have a HUGE entrepreneurial spirit myself. I have thought of starting my own businesses before I ever graduate high school. I learned the hard way that 99% of them were pipe dreams. But nobody really sat me down and explained all the hurdles. That being said, I currently have a full time career and also operate two different businesses that are relatively profitable. I ended up scratching countless business ideas before I found one that worked for me. My advice is that you keep trying until something fits. The best place to look is in areas of your life that you already have knowledge and/or skill. That will eliminate several hurdles right off the bat.

Ultimate_sig 05-04-2013 02:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hiwall (Post 1235888)

Yes it is.

Can you give me some advice, or some friendly cretecing

Ultimate_sig 05-04-2013 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Olympus (Post 1235924)

You've got several fairly large obstacles to conquer in this scenario.

1. Simply getting a FFL is no small feat. You may look into the process and realize that you'll never be able to get your license due to zoning restrictions, etc.

2. You're wanting to produce a product in which you have little to know experience producing or possibly even knowledge of the subtleties of operations. I predict you'll spend a HUGE amount of money in wasted time and materials simply trying to design something from scratch using machinery that you have no experience using.

3. Unless you're using CNC maching, your production as a one-man shop using one small bench top lathe will be extremely low. The chances of you selling enough finished products to recoup all the money wasted during "R&D" are very slim and would probably take years.

4. People are machinists by trade. It is definitely not impossible to teach yourself, but you're talking a significant time investment just to learn how to properly operate a lathe and to calculate measurements in fractions you didn't even know existed before.

5. And provided that you're able to conquer all the above hurdles, you'll still be a small shop with relatively low production, so you'll constantly have to keep marketing your business so you're not forgotten about.

I don't mean to discourage you, I'm just trying to be realistic with you. I have a HUGE entrepreneurial spirit myself. I have thought of starting my own businesses before I ever graduate high school. I learned the hard way that 99% of them were pipe dreams. But nobody really sat me down and explained all the hurdles. That being said, I currently have a full time career and also operate two different businesses that are relatively profitable. I ended up scratching countless business ideas before I found one that worked for me. My advice is that you keep trying until something fits. The best place to look is in areas of your life that you already have knowledge and/or skill. That will eliminate several hurdles right off the bat.

Thank you for that. So I guess before I dive into this I need to get my feet wet. Get a trade and then a part time as an operator. I just want to do something different. I've worked in bars for the past 6 years and it's getting old. I want to do something were I can grow. I can't really move up or do what I want because my tits aren't big enough if you catch my drift.

You haven't popped my bubble you've just help me create a mental timeline for the next few years. For that I thank you and respect your advice for putting things into aspect.

Axxe55 05-04-2013 02:47 AM

Sig, first thing is what about start-up capitol? starting any new business from scratch is going to require a huge influx of capital to get started.

next, right now with the current economic climate and the political adminstration, now might not be the best time to start this type of venture. even firmly established gun shops are having a hard time.

where do you plan on doing business? have to consider zoning. if you can't do it at home due to zoning, that means renting or buying a shop that would allow for you to such business. with that, there is going to be rent or mortgage payment, utilities, taxes and ect.....

then you need the proper equipment to do what you want to do. as mentioned, slow production rate equals low income on products. the Grizzly you mentioned, though a good product, not for mass production though. then trying to start into a market, that already has proven players that have been doing it for many years, well that's going to be a huge obstacle to overcome, if you do.

nothing wrong with having a desire and a dream, but there are realities that need to be addressed if they are to be realistic.

therewolf 05-04-2013 03:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ultimate_sig (Post 1235929)
Can you give me some advice, or some friendly cretecing

Running a lathe isn't particularly difficult, it's just complicated.

You have to be very careful, until you get very familiar with the

machine, to be sure to remove very small amounts of metal from the work

piece.

You would really want training, or mentoring until you were fully

aware of proper balancing, mounting, setting speeds, feeds,

properly fabricating and adjusting bits, etc.

Then you're back to square one with Olympus's observations.

Perhaps if you sought to work in a shop which makes the

items you were thinking of making, it would give you

some closer insight.

Ultimate_sig 05-04-2013 03:21 AM

I think im going to go to school for it and get a trade then a job as a cnc operator or programmer. I have a little experience with auto cad but it's been so long it might help to take the courses again. Thanks for the advice and starting my own business right now is not the way to go at this time.

BillM 05-04-2013 03:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ultimate_sig (Post 1236018)
I think im going to go to school for it and get a trade then a job as a cnc operator or programmer. I have a little experience with auto cad but it's been so long it might help to take the courses again. Thanks for the advice and starting my own business right now is not the way to go at this time.

Now that's starting to look like a plan:)

You also might check out the local community colleges and see if
they offer a basic machine operation course. Grab a small lathe and
build a couple of suppressors (with the proper paperwork BEFORE
you start making chips)

A usable suppressor is well within the capabilities of the fairly
skilled craftsman. A state of the art suppressor? Different
critter. Now you get into CNC milling centers, wire and sinker EDM,
and machining my favorite metal I love to hate-----Titanium.

Ultimate_sig 05-04-2013 03:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BillM (Post 1236024)

Now that's starting to look like a plan:)

You also might check out the local community colleges and see if
they offer a basic machine operation course. Grab a small lathe and
build a couple of suppressors (with the proper paperwork BEFORE
you start making chips)

A usable suppressor is well within the capabilities of the fairly
skilled craftsman. A state of the art suppressor? Different
critter. Now you get into CNC milling centers, wire and sinker EDM,
and machining my favorite metal I love to hate-----Titanium.

Yea I'd like to do that. Id like to re-invent the suppressor and fix the little problems with them or make them better.


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:31 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.