You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of FirearmsTalk.com!    
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Firearms Forums > Curio & Relic Discussion >

Weapons Trivia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-19-2017, 11:27 PM   #2741
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Clermont's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 862
Liked 86 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Handgun trivia. When we think of handguns with side plates, revolvers come to mind. However, a few early, turn of the 19th century, semi-automatic pistols had side plates. Later, post WWII, semi-automatic pistols lacked side plates, except for one. Identify the post WWII semi-automatic pistol having a side plate.
Clermont is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2017, 01:56 AM   #2742
Administrator
FTF_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c3shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Third bunker on the right,Central Virginia
Posts: 21,010
Liked 15796 Times on 6571 Posts
Likes Given: 2557

Default

I know of a S&W pistol (post war) that has a part that is CALLED a sideplate. Unsure if that is the one you are thinking of.
__________________
What we have here is... failure- to communicate.
c3shooter is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2017, 12:16 PM   #2743
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Clermont's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 862
Liked 86 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
I know of a S&W pistol (post war) that has a part that is CALLED a sideplate. Unsure if that is the one you are thinking of.
You are correct, c3shooter, the Smith & Wesson Model 61 Escort, a .22 cal. semi-automatic pistol, has a side plate. In the Escort's four years of production, there were three production changes resulting in four models, the 61, 61-1, 61-2, and 61-3. The information is from the December 1978 American Rifleman.

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion
Clermont is offline  
kfox75 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2017, 03:43 PM   #2744
Administrator
FTF_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c3shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Third bunker on the right,Central Virginia
Posts: 21,010
Liked 15796 Times on 6571 Posts
Likes Given: 2557

Default

If they had kept making changes, they might have finally come up with one that did not break!
__________________
What we have here is... failure- to communicate.
c3shooter is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2017, 03:44 PM   #2745
Administrator
FTF_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c3shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Third bunker on the right,Central Virginia
Posts: 21,010
Liked 15796 Times on 6571 Posts
Likes Given: 2557

Default

Here is a question- we are all familiar with smoothbore guns, and rifled guns. However, what was the gun that was neither fish nor fowl- it started as a smoothbore, and partway down the barrel became rifled. What was that called?
__________________
What we have here is... failure- to communicate.
c3shooter is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2017, 11:34 PM   #2746
RKB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RKB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 725
Liked 623 Times on 371 Posts
Likes Given: 961

Default

Paradox gun.
RKB is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 12:44 AM   #2747
Administrator
FTF_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c3shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Third bunker on the right,Central Virginia
Posts: 21,010
Liked 15796 Times on 6571 Posts
Likes Given: 2557

Default

Give the man a see-gar! Introduced in 1886 by Holland & Holland, the Paradox was a heavily-built double-barrelled shotgun in which a short length of the barrels at the muzzle was rifled. The invention of Colonel George Fosbery VC, who also designed an 'automatic' (i.e. self-cocking) revolver, the Paradox could be used with either a solid projectile or shot, and was thus potentially a good all-round weapon against thin-skinned game, and the concept was soon copied by other gun-makers. The cartridges were usually sized by bore (gauge) and not caliber.

Here are a couple of 4 inch 4 bore rounds- compared to a .22 Hornet.

4-Bore-Black-Powder-Cartridge.-1-of-2.jpg
__________________
What we have here is... failure- to communicate.
c3shooter is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 07:12 PM   #2748
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Clermont's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 862
Liked 86 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Bolt action rifle trivia. The two Mauser type bolt action rifles on the cover of the November 1954 American Rifleman are engraved with detachable butt stocks. Why is there no trigger or trigger guard?

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion
Clermont is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 01:00 AM   #2749
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Clermont's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 862
Liked 86 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Clue. Both of these rifles, as depicted, performed flawlessly when fired.
Clermont is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 11:55 PM   #2750
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Clermont's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 862
Liked 86 Times on 74 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clermont View Post
Bolt action rifle trivia. The two Mauser type bolt action rifles on the cover of the November 1954 American Rifleman are engraved with detachable butt stocks. Why is there no trigger or trigger guard?

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion
Answer to the bolt action rifle trivia. Although unseen, both rifles have a trigger. On October 24, 1916, Ralph G. Packard was issued U.S. patent number 1202416 for an invention that uses a thumb trigger, instead of the traditional trigger, to fire a rifle. Packard believed the position of the thumb, while shouldering a rifle, is where the trigger should be placed, a "button" to be pressed by the thumb, resulting in less movement of the rifle when firing than the traditional trigger. Included in the November 1954 American Rifleman are two additional comments regarding Packard's thumb trigger patent.

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

A three page article, Thumb Trigger Model 1903 Springfield Rifle, appeared in the November 1990 THE GUN REPORT.

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

Weapons Trivia - Curio & Relic Discussion

This is a link to Ralph G. Packard's eight page thumb trigger patent.

http://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?Docid=01202416&homeurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft.usp to.gov%2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect1%3DPTO1%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526d%3DP ALL%2526p%3D1%2526u%3D%25252Fnetahtml%25252FPTO%25 252Fsrchnum.htm%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3D50%252 6s1%3D1202416.PN.%2526OS%3DPN%2F1202416%2526RS%3DP N%2F1202416&PageNum=&Rtype=&SectionNum=&idkey=NONE &Input=View+first+page
Clermont is offline  
kfox75 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
TV Rifle Trivia AR10 The Club House 6 05-04-2013 03:33 AM
Voting trivia BillM The Club House 4 05-03-2013 07:18 PM
Revolver Trivia canebrake Revolver Handguns 27 12-11-2010 03:14 PM
Trivia Gordo323 The Club House 6 05-27-2010 08:41 PM