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Old 07-10-2014, 09:23 PM   #251
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Would this have to do with post WWI army ploy to change to the SNL standard nomenclature list
By the US Army in mid 1920's


It was designed to simplify and standardize the cataloging of common items in use by the Department of War. It replaced the earlier hodgepodge of cataloging systems in use.*
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Old 07-11-2014, 01:22 AM   #252
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The 30-06 was morphed from the 30-03 service ctg of which 80k of the 30-03 cal 1903 Springfield bolt action service rifles were mfg before the change to the chambering to the well known 30-06govt ctg we know today, several Gatling guns were converted, 1895 Winchester lever action, the 1895 colt/browning machine gun, model 1909 machine rifle aka the Hotchkiss Benet-Mercie light machine gun.
what is little known is the European mfg Krag rifles(not to be confused with the weak single lug US Krags) were built stouter and were mfg in 8mm calibers and 30-06 (7.62x63)
Excuse me, but......[yea gawds, another "expert"]....The Danish Krag was caliber 8x58 Danish Rimmed. The Norwegian Krags were 6.5x55.
Maybe a few other calibers were made, but these and the U.S. 30-40 are the main.
[and if you happen across a case of 8x58DR, You can make me extremely happy.}
Yes, I do have some of each. Rifles that is.

Last edited by coastie; 07-11-2014 at 01:41 AM. Reason: clarification
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Old 07-11-2014, 02:36 AM   #253
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Default 8x57Mauser- Norwegian Krag

[quote=coastie;1602642]Excuse me, but......[yea gawds, another "expert"]....The Danish Krag was caliber 8x58 Danish Rimmed. The Norwegian Krags were 6.5x55.
Maybe a few other calibers were made, but these and the U.S. 30-40 are the main.
[and if you happen across a case of 8x58DR,


according to wiki the Norwegian Krags had a prolific run and post war experiments in 30-06 and, 7.62 NATO.
File Type: jpeg 8x58mm .jpeg (5.0 KB, 55 views)
File Type: jpeg 8x58 mauser.jpeg (6.2 KB, 55 views)
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Old 07-11-2014, 09:37 AM   #254
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The Mk II, pineapple, fragmentation hand grenade of WWII was replaced by the M26 fragmentation, egg, hand grenade used in the Korean War. Why wasn't the M26 hand grenade given the Mk III designation, which would have normally followed the Mk II designation?
To this day, when the United States Navy develops and adopts a item, the item is given a Mk with a number designation. If it is a new category, the item will be designated MkI. The United States Navy developed and adopted both the MkI and MkII fragmentation hand grenades. The answer to my trivia question is the M26 fragmentation grenade was not developed by the United States Navy. Had it been, it would have had Mk designation.
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Old 07-11-2014, 10:40 AM   #255
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So, if a hand grenade landed at your feet, picking it up and throwing it would not be an option? You would "drop belly down top of head facing the grenade a open your mouth and cover your ears"?

I know it sounds stupid but that is what you are trained to do if a grenade lands close to you. It minimizes your target profile and presents a hard target towards the grenade(your head should have a Kevlar helmet on it) and the shrapnel should blow out and up away from the ground. You open your mouth to help protect against over pressure damage and cover your ears cause that **** is loud. Now that being said that is how the army trains you not how everyone reacts. We have quite a few wounded warriors missing hands from trying to toss back grenades!


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Old 07-11-2014, 04:46 PM   #256
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The MKII is a fragmentation grenade. The MKIII is a concussion grenade. The M26 is a fragmentation grenade and an upgrade of the MKII. The M33 is an upgrade of the M26 and still a MKII class fragmentation grenade.
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Old 07-11-2014, 06:25 PM   #257
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Quote-The original Mk II grenade had a 3/8" threaded baseplug in its base. This was designed to place the explosive filling. The product-improved "Mk IIA1" introduced in 1942 lacked the bottom filler hole of the Mk II and was filled through the fuse well. (Note: The term "Mk. IIA1" is used informally by armorers, historians, and collectors but was never officially used as a nomenclature by the US military.[1])
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Old 07-12-2014, 09:55 AM   #258
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Default Goverment Model 1911 Trivia

Government Model 1911 pistol trivia.Why is this statement correct or incorrect? On early .45 ACP Government Model 1911 pistols, military serial numbers were placed on the right side of the frame and commercial serial numbers were placed on the left side of the frame.
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:32 AM   #259
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Since this is a 'weapons trivia' thread, and since a submarine is classed as a weapon, I have to ask what submarine was sunk during combat by a truck?
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Old 07-13-2014, 02:40 AM   #260
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Default 1911 serialization

There is allot out there like stamping before and after finishing
also found this sight on commercial and military marking of colt 1911's
*
First Roman to about Serial Number 4500, then Arial/Block to end of M1911 production. When production started again in 1924 It then went Roman again at 700001 to 1945 at about Serial Number 2270000 when it went back to Arial/Block
*

S/N is forward of the*
slide stop hole

S/N is between the stock*
and slide stop hole.

Serial number location from*
S/N 0 to 7500

Serial number location from*
S/N 7501 to end of production

Serial number location under*
firing pin retainer plate*
(S/N 710,001 to about 1,140,000).

:*Due to military maintenance practices as well as barracks cleaning mix-ups, 1911A1 numbered slides were often mixed up and a number of 1911A1s in this serial number range will be found with numbers that are off by only a few numbers.**Many others will simply have mixed up slides and receivers.**A non-matching slide will reduce the value of a pistol to a collector considerably.**Yet pistols just beyond where the slides were numbered may bring considerably more money than a numbered pistol when the slide just a few numbers off. Yet there is no way to tell if the un-numbered slide matches either.

Commercial Note:**
In part of the year 1920 some Commercial Government Model pistols**had a serial number on the slide underside in front of**the disconnector well as well as on the receiver. This practice only lasted a few months and the slide serial number was moved to underneath the firing pin stop plate.**Some military pistols brought back by returning WWI vets were apparently sent to Colts for refinishing in that small time slot, and while refinishing, Colts applied their military serial number underneath the slide as was their standard practice for those months.*Reference Charles Clawsons “Colt .45 Service pistols


http://coolgunsite.com/pistols/serial%20number.htm

Last edited by Rex in OTZ; 07-13-2014 at 09:07 AM.
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