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-   -   My "New" Old Rifles.... (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f37/my-new-old-rifles-82691/)

Trez 01-28-2013 05:17 PM

My "New" Old Rifles....
 
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Thanks alot for encouraging a addict...:p

M1895 Steyr "Stuzen" I guess these were a conversion done by the Nazi's for one of their allies? It came with some Nazi ammo from 1938/39.

Very neat action!! "Almost" a semi-auto, with a En-Bloc clip, I jokingly call it my bolt action Garand... :p I would like to know who thought to put the rear sling swivel right where you hold the rifle... Its a little weird to get use to...

Trez 01-28-2013 05:33 PM

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Heres the Enfield, Its a 1942 BSA No.I Mk. III*.. Actually much more complicated than I thought, From somebody who's had mostly "Mauser" derived rifles, its very strange...
It has a weird trigger system and bolt... Whats the deal with the two part stock? Why did they make a little "nose" for the bayonet, instead of it going over the barrel like other rifles of its day?

I do like the fine adjustment for the sights, thats pretty neat!

303tom 01-28-2013 06:23 PM

You got em both, good deal & your welcome...............

marc29th 01-28-2013 06:32 PM

Got to love these old guns! I think I'm going to pick up a Steyr M95 Stutzen to go with my M95/34. There doesn't seem to be much difference between them other than the rear sights and sling swivels.

c3shooter 01-28-2013 07:20 PM

Re: two piece stock, and "nose" for the bayonet- The British USED their rifles- with bayonets.

Oh, not just in WW 1- remember, they were the Empire on which the sun never sat. Dealing with troublesome natives, brigands, the odd riot or melee here and there- if you damaged the wood, replace the part you damaged (and the buttstock DID come in 3 different lengths- depending on whether you were a Ghurka or a Scot Highlander)

The "nose" for the bayonet reduced the likelihood of bending the barrel when using the sword bayonet.

BTW, have you noticed just how FAST that bolt action is? :)

Trez 01-28-2013 07:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 1113813)
Re: two piece stock, and "nose" for the bayonet- The British USED their rifles- with bayonets.

Oh, not just in WW 1- remember, they were the Empire on which the sun never sat. Dealing with troublesome natives, brigands, the odd riot or melee here and there- if you damaged the wood, replace the part you damaged (and the buttstock DID come in 3 different lengths- depending on whether you were a Ghurka or a Scot Highlander)

The "nose" for the bayonet reduced the likelihood of bending the barrel when using the sword bayonet.

BTW, have you noticed just how FAST that bolt action is? :)

Ok The stock thing makes sense, just seems strange nobody else did it then...

Didnt everybody use their bayonets?? What about the Japanese? I thought they Bayoneted everything... Hell they would Bayonet charge tanks! :p

I donno I gotta give the quickest bolt to the "Ruck-Zuck" over the Enfield... ;)

I have a quick question, whats the swivel in front of the mag for?

c3shooter 01-28-2013 11:47 PM

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Some of the rifles had 3 sling swivels- on at the front of the trigger guard. That point could also be used to attach the canvas action cover so that when you unsnapped the cover, you did not lose it.

http://imageevent.com/willyp/forsaletradeitems1/weaponsrelateditems?p=9&n=1&m=-1&c=4&l=0&w=4&s=0&z=9

You will also find some rifles with what sorta looks like a 4th sling swivel out near the muzzle, but the swivel band has a slot at center. Those were known to the Brits as a piling swivel- to the Americans, a stacking swivel. Permiited 3-5 rifles to be "stacked" when not in use, rather than laying on the ground. After the M1 Garand, we stopped using stacking swivels, and used the slings to "stack arms".

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