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-   -   Mauser HSc 7.65 (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f37/mauser-hsc-7-65-a-60716/)

Tyrsgodi 03-21-2012 01:52 PM

Mauser HSc 7.65
 
I have a beautiful little .32, traded to my dad in the 60s by the American officer who took it from the German casualty in Europe. It has the Wehrmacht logo stamps. Bluing is mostly gone, but no rust and fully functional. Two questions:
1) What value has it?
2) Are records available to trace by serial number who it was issued to?

TheOldMan 03-21-2012 02:54 PM

Pictures?? I mean basically it's a PPK clone but pics would be nice to gage it's condition for pricing...

c3shooter 03-21-2012 07:31 PM

$300-$600, depending on pre-war or wartime, and exact condition.

Are there records of who it was issued to? No. Not to give you a short answer, but no. Military weapons were issued to a unit, who then issued them to an individual. Being on the losing side, those records are gone.

Tyrsgodi 03-22-2012 01:29 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Hmm. Never thought of it as a PPK copy. But it is a clean, non-snagging pocket pistol, and much more elegant than the new .380s!

robocop10mm 03-22-2012 02:30 AM

While certainly not a "clone" of the PPK, it is in the same class of handguns. I always liked the Hsc more than the PPK. Heavy, but sturdy and accurate.

Tyrsgodi 03-22-2012 02:35 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Dad also had a 1914 model Mauser. Talk about precise tooling! Taking that down to get the cosmoline out was a true pleasure!

TheOldMan 03-22-2012 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robocop10mm (Post 747814)
While certainly not a "clone" of the PPK, it is in the same class of handguns. I always liked the Hsc more than the PPK. Heavy, but sturdy and accurate.

Guess it would have been best to say that it's design was "influenced" by the PP/PPK sorry bout that :)

Very nice weapons BTW..

Tyrsgodi 01-22-2016 11:55 PM

I just tonight discovered ( found a source) for the black grips. During 1943, and after, the brown and black plastic replaced the walnut. s/n 611809

OldManMontgomery 01-24-2016 07:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tyrsgodi (Post 747111)
I have a beautiful little .32, traded to my dad in the 60s by the American officer who took it from the German casualty in Europe. It has the Wehrmacht logo stamps. Bluing is mostly gone, but no rust and fully functional. Two questions:
1) What value has it?

As C3 said, probably between $300 - $600, depending. The HSc was first released in 1941, and if the story is correct about coming from a "German casualty", it sounds like was a marked, military weapon. Normally, that would increase the value in the collector's market. IF you have some documentation (other than a written claim not verified or verifiable) the provenance is supported and typically value goes up - for a collector.

As a shooter, the Mauser pistols (all of them) are well designed and well built. However, in the U. S. 7.65mm (Browning) is not considered a serious defensive round by most shooters. In Europe I understand 7.65mm is considered medium. But remember, 'collectors' and 'shooters' are different (both guns and people) and look for different things.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Tyrsgodi
2) Are records available to trace by serial number who it was issued to?

Probably not. Again, C3 is correct. The best bet is IF the 'capture' papers are available, they might identify the 'German casualty' and from what unit he came.

The year of manufacture can be found fairly easy on the internet if that is any comfort.

Good luck in any event.

Tyrsgodi 01-26-2016 07:46 PM

Thanks! No papers, but the black plastic grips had a few of us searching for references. Most were walnut, but from 1943 on, they got plastic.

Mauser HSc was produced as a civilian weapon as early as 1934.


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