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Old 03-17-2013, 12:51 PM   #21
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A cheap gun is still a cheap gun.
True

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If your going to invest in guns, you need to buy investment quality guns.
Not true.
If I had bought that KelTek Sub 2000 2 years ago NIB for $300, (I didn't, because it looked and felt cheap), I could have quadrupled my money recently, from what I hear. $300 might have turned into an AR!!!!
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Old 03-17-2013, 09:49 PM   #22
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Not true.
If I had bought that KelTek Sub 2000 2 years ago NIB for $300, (I didn't, because it looked and felt cheap), I could have quadrupled my money recently, from what I hear. $300 might have turned into an AR!!!!
Agreed. Those No4MK1*'s and K98's have done well for me though.

Take a look at Highpoint 995 Carbines. I bought one when they 1st came out. $110.00. I was offered $250.00 the other day. I tortured That carbine. Never cleaned it except for the bore from 1994 till 2012. You do the math. It finally failed to eject. It has had only 1 major cleaning after that. Granted, It has 3 mags, A stock cover that holds the extra 2 mags, an old Soviet 4x32mm Carbine scope, and a muzzle brake. It came w/ that for an extra $20.00, except for the scope. It did come w/ the scope mount, a weaver rail.
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:02 PM   #23
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The value in the market place is for high end collectables. Handguns made before 1898 fall off the radar so far as the BATF is concerened in many cases not all.
Early Colts, Luger and Mauser pistols continue to sell and increase in value. The collectible firearms are bought by investors who can afford to purchase even in bad economic times. AR-15s and old battle rifles are not in the high demand collectors class of firearms. Colt SAA pre war guns have kept pace with gold values for the past 70 years.

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Old 03-18-2013, 10:19 AM   #24
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The value in the market place is for high end collectables.
If you stuck a "usually" in there, I'd agree. But, certain times, places, and circumstances change that, like now. I would say Jpatterson's Hi Point has done well for him, wouldn't you?
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Old 03-18-2013, 12:07 PM   #25
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Small marginal profits gleaned from the sale of modern sporting rifles is not a good long term investment. These firearms must be sold thru private sales which can be a problem.
Investments in pre 1898 and Civil War firearms generate much higher returns and are not often involved in paper trails.

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Old 03-18-2013, 12:26 PM   #26
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I've never made money on guns. Never kept them long enough for them to be worth more. I tend to change things around a lot so I'm always losing. It's buy retail, own for 30-60 days, then flip for a loss. I do buy more (paying retail) and hone my way to ultimate keepers little by little. I'm a gun store's dream.

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Old 03-18-2013, 12:46 PM   #27
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You are the original average American gun owner.

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Old 03-18-2013, 10:59 PM   #28
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Small marginal profits gleaned from the sale of modern sporting rifles is not a good long term investment. These firearms must be sold thru private sales which can be a problem.
Investments in pre 1898 and Civil War firearms generate much higher returns and are not often involved in paper trails.

OK, so buying No4MkI*'s at $125.00 and flipping them years later for 300.00 is marginal? In NH you don't need a paper trail. Handguns can be sold to a person "known" to you with no paper/FFL. K98's are even better. Common code vet bring backs were 150.00..175.00 back when. They sell for 600.00+++ for a nice specimen. I'm not disagreeing with the value of pre 1898 arms, but they are not cheap to buy unless you are talking Finnish Mosin Nagants and know the correct person to buy from.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:42 AM   #29
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Throwing this out there... This current young generation and the one that follows...do they like guns? Do they shoot? Do they plan to own guns? Have they already been brainwashed against them? Do they even know what a K98 is? A 1903 Springfield? The Mosin? The Arisaka? Do they care? Are they reading "The Shotgun News"?

Once all the old guys die off who is buying all those old vintage bolt-actions? Will they be worth anything? I don't know. Something is only worth what someone is willing to pay. A bunch of liberal freedom haters might not be interested in a Russian revolver from their great grandfather's era. Just playing the opposite side. Anyone ever think about that?

Most of the people I know that are buying guns are white men over 40, myself included. I stood in line for hours at the most recent gun show and judging by whom was in the line with me I'd say I'm right. My Grandfather gave me an A3-03. My nephew (who is 16) has no idea what that is and he certainly isn't in the market for a Colt SA Army with history. So I ask, can the current crop and the next and the next be counted on to keep gun collecting alive? Will any of them want to buy our wares? Or are they too busy wearing skinny pants and feeling sorry for themselves.

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Old 03-19-2013, 02:56 PM   #30
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I have always considered my guns as an investment, I have some I bought years ago for under $50.00 that are worth $1000`s now, so (Guns as an investment?) you damn right...................

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