Considering buying a Mosin
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > General Firearms Forums > Curio & Relic Discussion > Considering buying a Mosin

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-24-2012, 02:48 AM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bearsdad40cc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts

Default Considering buying a Mosin

I'm considering buying a Mosin for my first rifle. #1 for the cost and #2 I enjoy WWII history. What should I like for when buying one ie type, country, condition any other advice?

__________________
Bearsdad40cc is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 10-24-2012, 03:49 AM   #2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Garadex's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Kalifornia
Posts: 1,267
Liked 225 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 228

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearsdad40cc
I'm considering buying a Mosin for my first rifle. #1 for the cost and #2 I enjoy WWII history. What should I like for when buying one ie type, country, condition any other advice?
The Finnish variants are generally seen as more accurate than the Russian ones. Of the russian variants hex receiver ones from Tula arsenal are usually more sought after. As to condition make sure that there aren't any bends or cracks in anything unless you plan on repairing it; with the exception of the receiver, don't buy one with a damaged receiver. Good luck on the search and I'm certain more people will be by with advice.
__________________

I'm gonna stop you right there, you just said an AR-15 is a high-powered rifle. It is obvious you don't know anything about guns and I shall ignore anything you say from this point on.

Garadex is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:07 AM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
vincent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mid-Atlantic NC
Posts: 4,122
Liked 1958 Times on 1030 Posts
Likes Given: 4286

Default

Four things to keep in mind...

1-Bore

2-Bore

3-Bore

4-Crown

It's most likely not going to be perfect but look for pitting and excessive wear.

You should probably avoid anything that's been counterbored...

The mil-surp ammo is corrosive (primers) so give it a good bath with hot soapy water after a range trip.

Usually a gun shop will get them by the crate, 20 per crate. You might be able to choose from a few. Bring a bore light and a rag...(They're coated in grease for storage)

Matching numbers is considered more desirable but does not matter much as far as performance is concerned...

The hex receivers are a little harder to come by and generally cost 25-50 bucks more, the last of them being produced in 1935 IIRC...

Good luck in your search and post some pics when you find one!!

__________________
Member NRA, GOA, GRNC, SAF, NAGR

Proud Supporter of USA Shooting
vincent is offline  
therewolf Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 05:07 AM   #4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
potentialglock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,160
Liked 160 Times on 113 Posts

Default

I own one and its honestly a fun project to remove the cosmoline. But its super hard to find a place to shoot them unless you're a member of an outdoor range.

__________________
potentialglock is offline  
therewolf Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 05:57 AM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bearsdad40cc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Thanx for the info guys. I found the Mosin thread in curio and relics, the thread where y'all are discussing a separate cat. for Mosins, lots of info. Learned about counter bore and how the bolt handle sticks out. Forgot to mention earlier, I found 2 in my LGS, 1 for $129 and the other they said is a sniper version w/ scope for $499. What's sniper version?

__________________
Bearsdad40cc is offline  
towboater Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 10:08 AM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: \
Posts: 990
Liked 133 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 43

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearsdad40cc View Post
Thanx for the info guys. I found the Mosin thread in curio and relics, the thread where y'all are discussing a separate cat. for Mosins, lots of info. Learned about counter bore and how the bolt handle sticks out. Forgot to mention earlier, I found 2 in my LGS, 1 for $129 and the other they said is a sniper version w/ scope for $499. What's sniper version?
Not worth $499 from a practical standpoint. If your asking this question your not a collector. If you are handy with a grinder and a belt sander you can make a pre-WWII hex model shoot well enough to use it for a hunting weapon. Most of the 91/30's are meant to be shot with the bayonet in place. Which means you will need to grind/sand about 3/8" off the rear sight ramp to be able to use the front sight.

If you plan to hunt with a mosin nagant 91/30 don't even bother shooting milsurp ammo. The 203 gr Brown Bear SP shoots about 6" higher than milsurp at 100 yards.

Make sure all the serial numbers match. If the serial numbers don't match the gun is just pieces someone just threw together. Some people will accept a forced match which is a gun the serial numbers have been struck thru and a new serial number has been stamped on it. I will have nothing to do with a forced match rifle.

Take a bore light with you. When you look down the barrel it should look like a new rifle. Avoid rifles that have been counter bored. When you look at the area were the bolt handle locks in the firing position you want to be able to see the machine marks from machining the receiver. That means the gun was likely never put into service. The most attractive rifle in the bunch is seldom the best. If the gun was never put into service the forestock will be stained black.

When you get the gun home hose it down with WD40. Let it sit overnight -Then hose it down again before wiping it down. A 20 gauge brush and mop will fit into the receiver. Use your old one if you have more than one brush and mop, it will be trashed by the time you get the gun clean.
__________________

"I do not aim with my hand; I aim with my eye. He who aims with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
I do not shoot with my hand; I shoot with my mind. He who shoots with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
I do not kill with my gun; I kill with my heart. He who kills with his gun has forgotten the face of his father."

Adopt a pet!! http://www.aspca.org/ Some of the finest pleasure horses come from here: http://www.canterusa.org/

Old_Crow is offline  
therewolf Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 10:34 AM   #7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pasco Cty.FL
Posts: 6,593
Liked 2506 Times on 1428 Posts
Likes Given: 1947

Default

What everybody else said, first. Wise they all are. Listen to them you

should.

My take, get either a mint M44, be it Russian, Polish, or Romanian.

Or the T53 version of the M44-same gun but Chinese origin.

It'll cost about twice the price of the average 91/30, but:

1. It's a great little carbine, much more practical, and easier to

handle than a 91/30, because of the shorter barrel.

2. You can hunt with it. The built-in bayonet makes it especially

nice against wild boar, in short brush terrain.

3. It's a very passable SHTF gun.

4. If you get a really nice one, it will set the standard for

future Mosin purchases, and you wont wind up with any

dodgy pieces of crap.



About 250-300$ should get you a clean one.

Frankly, I'm a little surprised nobody's mentioned the rifle's insane fun

factor...

__________________

Last edited by therewolf; 10-24-2012 at 10:36 AM.
therewolf is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 01:07 PM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Chainfire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 3,603
Liked 1463 Times on 885 Posts
Likes Given: 339

Default

My advice would be, if you are looking for a collectable shooter, at a decent price is to buy an M-91/30 for no more than $120.00 out the door. Pay attention to the condition of the bore, most are fine, because they came through a refurbishment process that culled the bad bores. If you get one from a shop, selling a crate of rifles, you are better off. Most of the damage to the bores happened in the good old US by Bubbas not cleaning the rifles after shooting. Don't let a counter-bore stop you from buying. The front of the rifliling was damged by the cleaning process and the rifles were counter-bored to correct the issue. Counter bore is a good thing, not a bad thing.

After selecting, first, on the quality of the bore, then pick one that looks good to you. Matching numbers on the barrel shank, the bolt, the magazine floor-plate and the butt-plate are a good thing, if they are stamped, rather than electro-penciled, it is better. Some folks sell them with a matchin bayonet number as well, but keep in mind that all of the matching was done during refurbishment, and few of the "matching" parts will actually be original to the rifle on the day it left the factory.

Older rifles attract more attention, the hex receivers are generally more desired, though they are, in no way superior to the round receivers. If you are buying to shoot, it doesn't make any difference.

I would also advise you to keep the rifle original. The price of these guns is going to go way up within a few short years. Even refinishing the stock will detract a great deal from the value. Any other permanant alterations will keep your rifle from rising in value.

It is very important to maintain the rifle properly. There are plenty of good threads here, and onl other forums on how to properly clean the rile. Believe me, it is worth it to do it right. Delaying the proper cleaning by just a few days can ruin a good shooting rifle. There are Mosin-Nagant specific gun forums that have an amazing amount of very detailed information about these rifles, availiable for you to study, it is worth while to check them out.

You must be aware that buying a Mosin-Nagant can be the begining of an addiction to these rifles. I bought my first only about five years ago, I now have over 40 of them, and I see no end in sight.

__________________

"It is better to be too skeptical then too credulous"

Carl Sagan

Chainfire is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 03:37 PM   #9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Mosin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 4,589
Liked 3859 Times on 1864 Posts
Likes Given: 701

Default

Depends on what you're looking for. Me and my buddies use Mosins for deer hunting. However, in order to accurately hit the deer, we hunt like this...

th.jpeg  
__________________
Mosin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:01 PM   #10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bearsdad40cc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Thanx for all the great advice guys. I'm looking for a cool, military rifle for plinking and for SHTF. I've recently got into firearms ( past 6 months) I have my CCL and I carry a M&P shield 40 cal. I was considering a .22 rifle for "most common ammo" but after buying a box of 22 bullets I've changed my mind. LoL. After a lot of reading on here and mil surplus mag decided to go for the Mosin. I also have a century AK on Layaway.

__________________
Bearsdad40cc is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Thinking about buying a Mosin-Nagant Garadex General Rifle Discussion 15 04-20-2012 12:37 PM
buying a mosin nagant 45acpbeast General Rifle Discussion 6 03-24-2012 11:14 AM
Buying a gun Rabbit0017 1911 Forum 10 02-17-2012 11:59 PM
what to look for, buying a cc gun. Tailypoe General Handgun Discussion 35 06-19-2011 01:52 AM
buying unknownhero82 The Club House 36 04-01-2010 01:34 AM