The Battle Rifles That Won WWII - Page 4
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Old 02-02-2013, 12:02 PM   #31
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The idea with those was to allow a person to shoot a German and then pick up his rifle and use it.

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Old 02-02-2013, 12:57 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Trez View Post
I dont think they called the Mosin "The greatest battle implement ever devised"

Ill take a Garand over a Mosin any day.....
I think you missed the point of his post. There is no question that the Garand was the finest weapon available to a soldier in WWII. If you listed the rifles in order of importance, not quality, the Mosin would be at the top.

If the three rifles in the OP were in a movie, the Mosin would be the star and the Enfield and Garand would be listed as "also appeared."

Contrary to what American history books teach you, WWII was mainly fought between the Soviets and Germans. Our main participation was our industrial production. That is not to take away from our soldier's participation, their bravery, or their honor, or their fighting ability, it is just that the war was to be won or lost in Eastern Europe.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:38 PM   #33
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It was not the Nagant that saved the Communist. Hell it was the long winters in Russia. The Nazis allowed their army to be cut off from their supply lines.
Stalin and Hitler were allies. The Nazis turned on the "Reds" and our socialist leader FDR saved these idiots. That allowed the Communist to kill Americans for 80 more years.

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Old 02-02-2013, 02:43 PM   #34
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It was not the Nagant that saved the Communist. Hell it was the long winters in Russia. The Nazis allowed their army to be cut off from their supply lines.
Stalin and Hitler were allies. The Nazis turned on the "Reds" and our socialist leader FDR saved these idiots. That allowed the Communist to kill Americans for 80 more years.
Had Russia stayed Allies with Germany we would not be having this conversation right now....we wouldn't be allowed to.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:52 PM   #35
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If the Mosin and Enfield are so great, why dont I ever see commercial versions of them at the LGS? Ive seen commercial non-military Garands, and just about every bolt action today is based off the Mauser...

I guess ever since I got my 1903, Ive became a bit of a "snob". I was that guy who wondered why anybody would spend what they do for American guns, when others are so cheap, Then I shot a Garand and got a '03 and I completely understand now....

My Mosins are supposedly 2 of the best models, and if they are, I would hate to see the worst ones... Both my 91/30 PU and my M39, have the hardest bolts to operate in my entire collection, and Ive done all the "sticky bolt" remedies..

With the Enfield, whats the point of a detachable mag, if you still have to use the clips to reload it? You cant even use the mags like any other gun, from what I understand each mag was fitted to each rifle, and even if you had extras that fit you'll just mess up the feed lips changing between different mags. After reading C3's post showing how Enfields lose their headspace just by shooting them, Im half afraid to even shoot mine because I dont want to "wear it out" ...

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Old 02-02-2013, 05:13 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trez View Post
If the Mosin and Enfield are so great, why dont I ever see commercial versions of them at the LGS? Ive seen commercial non-military Garands, and just about every bolt action today is based off the Mauser...

I guess ever since I got my 1903, Ive became a bit of a "snob". I was that guy who wondered why anybody would spend what they do for American guns, when others are so cheap, Then I shot a Garand and got a '03 and I completely understand now....

My Mosins are supposedly 2 of the best models, and if they are, I would hate to see the worst ones... Both my 91/30 PU and my M39, have the hardest bolts to operate in my entire collection, and Ive done all the "sticky bolt" remedies..

With the Enfield, whats the point of a detachable mag, if you still have to use the clips to reload it? You cant even use the mags like any other gun, from what I understand each mag was fitted to each rifle, and even if you had extras that fit you'll just mess up the feed lips changing between different mags. After reading C3's post showing how Enfields lose their headspace just by shooting them, Im half afraid to even shoot mine because I dont want to "wear it out" ...
Canada still issues the No4 rifle to it's Army Rangers. Enough said. When did the M1 end service 30-40 years ago?
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:33 PM   #37
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Just what would the Russian Communist have done? They were so primitive they could not feed themselves. Where does this worship of the failed Marxist nation come from. How was the Russian going to attack America on mules?

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Old 02-02-2013, 05:47 PM   #38
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Just what would the Russian Communist have done? They were so primitive they could not feed themselves. Where does this worship of the failed Marxist nation come from. How was the Russian going to attack America on mules?
Re-read the history of WW2. Had the Russians not tied up 75% of Germany's Army the Germans would have had an unlimited amount of resources to win the war...and they almost did.
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:53 PM   #39
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I will just put this right here. The M1 was number 4 on the list


http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=PsDLjfA1Ylw
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:05 PM   #40
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i collect the us military ww2 only:



M1928 Thompson .45 caliber semi-auto clip fed rifle.
This was also issued to some WWII soldiers. Mine has a 30 round stick magazine (some 20 rounders
were common issue) and a 10 round drum magazine (original issue was 50 round). It has a finned
vertical hand grip. It’s a semi-auto version that I purchased new from Auto Ordinance in 2004 for
$850.00.
World War II
In 1938, the Thompson submachine gun was adopted by the U.S. military, serving during World War II and beyond.
There were two military types of Thompson SMG. The M1928A1 had provisions for box magazines and drums (the drums were disliked because of their tendency to rattle and jam). It had a Cutts compensator, cooling fins on the barrel, and its charging handle was on the top of the receiver. The M1 and M1A1 had a barrel without cooling fins, a simplified rear sight, provisions only for box magazines, and the charging handle was on the side of the receiver. Because the option to use drums was not included in the M1 and M1A1, the 30 round box magazine was designed for use with this model.
The Thompson was used in World War II in the hands of Allied troops as a weapon for scouts, non-commissioned officers (corporal, sergeant and higher ranking), and patrol leaders. In the European theater, the gun was widely utilized in British and Canadian Commando units, as well as the U.S. Army paratroopers and Ranger battalions who used it widely because of its high rate of fire, its stopping power and because it was very effective in close combat. A Swedish variant of the M1928A1, called Kulsprutepistol m/40 (meaning "submachine gun model 40"), served in the Swedish Army between 1940 and 1951. Through Lend-Lease, the Soviet Union also received the Thompson, but due to a shortage of appropriate ammunition in the Soviet Union, usage was not widespread.[20]
In the Pacific Theater, Australian Army infantry and other Commonwealth forces initially used the Thompson extensively in jungle patrols and ambushes, where it was prized for its firepower, though its hefty weight of over 10 pounds and difficulties in supply eventually led to its replacement by other submachine guns such as the Owen and Austen. The U.S. Marines also used the Thompson as a limited-issue weapon, especially during their later island assaults. The Thompson was soon found to have limited effect in heavy jungle cover, where the low-velocity .45 bullet would not penetrate most small-diameter trees, or protective armor vests (in 1923, the Army had rejected the .45 Remington-Thompson, which had twice the energy of the .45ACP).[21] In the U.S. Army, many Pacific War jungle patrols were originally equipped with Thompsons in the early phases of the New Guinea and Guadalcanal campaigns, but soon began employing the BAR in its place, especially at front (point) and rear (tail) positions, as a point defense weapon.[22] The Argentine company Hafdasa and the Buenos Aires based firm Halcon manufactured the C-4 and M-1943 submachine guns which have a very similar layout and performance to the Thompson Gun, both weapons chambered in 9x19mm for the Argentine Army and .45 ACP for the Argentine Police forces. These weapons were a serious contender to the Thompson Gun but did not see much service outside Argentina.

M1911 cal .45 Auto
This was the issued sidearm for the latter WWI soldiers which replaced the M1909 revolver. I built mine from new and used GI parts and assembled it on a Safari Arms receiver.

The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, and recoil-operated handgun chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge.[1] It was designed by John M. Browning, and was the standard-issue side arm for the United States armed forces from 1911 to 1985, and is still carried by some U.S. forces. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Its formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original Model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam era.[1] In total, the United States procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life.
The M1911 is the most well-known of John Browning's designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. Besides the pistol being widely copied itself, this operating system rose to become the pre-eminent type of the 20th century and of nearly all modern centerfire pistols. It is popular with civilian shooters in competitive events such as IDPA, International Practical Shooting Confederation, and Bullseye shooting. It is also a popular civilian concealed carry option due to its slim width.
M1917 Colt Revolver was modified by the US Army from the 45 Long Colt to chamber the newly adopted 45 Auto cartridge created to supplement inadequate stocks of M1911 pistols during World War One.[2]



Smith & Wesson “Victory” M10 Revolver in 6” barrel .38 S&W caliber. This gun was used in WWII
Mainly by aircraft pilots and for lend lease to our allies. Marked “US Property”

Victory model
The S&W Model 10 military revolvers produced from 1940 to 1945 had serial numbers with a "V" prefix, and were known as the Smith & Wesson Victory Model. It is noteworthy that early Victory Models did not always have the V prefix. During World War II, huge numbers - over 570,000 - of these pistols, chambered in the British .38/200 caliber already in use in the Enfield No 2 Mk I Revolver and the Webley Mk IV Revolver, were supplied to the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa under the Lend-Lease program. Most Victory Models sent to Britain were fitted with 4" (102 mm) or 5" (127 mm) barrels, though a few early versions had 6" (150 mm) barrels.[5][6] In general, most British and Commonwealth forces expressed a preference for the .38/200 Smith & Wesson over their standard Enfield revolver.[7]
The Victory Model was also used by United States forces during WWII, being chambered in the well-known and popular .38 Special cartridge. The Victory Model was a standard-issue sidearm for US Navy and Marine aircrews, and was also used by guards at factories and defense installations throughout the United States during the war. Some of these revolvers remained in service well into the 1990s with units of the US Armed Forces, including the Coast Guard. Some Lend-Lease Victory Model revolvers originally chambered for the British .38/200 were returned to the U.S. and rechambered to fire the more popular and more powerful .38 Special ammunition, and such revolvers are usually so marked on their barrels. Rechambering of .38-200 cylinders to .38 Special results in oversized chambers which may cause problems.
The finish on Victory Models is typically a sandblasted and parkerized finish, which is noticeably different from the higher-quality blue or nickel/chrome finishes usually found on commercial M&P/Model 10 revolvers. Other distinguishing features of the Victory Model revolver are the lanyard loop at the bottom of the grip frame, and the use of smooth (rather than checkered) walnut grip panels. However some early models did use a checkered grip. Most notably the pre-1942 manufacture.[8]

M1D Garand cal. 30-06 semi-automatic eight shot top loading clip fed Springfield Armory rifle. It was
designed and adopted by the US Army to replace the M1903 and M1917 rifles.
This rifle also came from DCM at a cost of $650.00. It was the designated “Sniper rifle” that was issued
During WWII and the Korean War. It has the scope, cheek piece, flash suppressor and bayonet that
Was issued with it. It is topped with a Libby-Owens-Ford manufactured M82 2.5 power scope. The
Rifle appears to be unfired or arsenal refinished. The scope, cheek pad and M2 flash hider were new in
Wrappers. I assembled it, zeroed it and fired about 10 rounds and that’s all it’s been used.

Most variants of the Garand, save the sniper variants, never saw active duty.[27] The sniper versions were modified to accept scope mounts, and two versions (the M1C, formerly M1E7, and the M1D, formerly M1E8) were produced, although not in significant quantities during World War II.[36] The only difference between the two versions is the mounting system for the telescopic sight. In June 1944, the M1C was adopted as a standard sniper rifle by the U.S. Army to supplement the venerable M1903A4.[37]
The procedure required to install the M1C-type mounts through drilling/tapping the hardened receiver was inefficient in terms of tooling and time. This resulted in the development of the M1D, which utilized a simpler, single-ring Springfield Armory mount.[37] The M1C and M1D first began to be widely used during the Korean War. The U.S. Marine Corps adopted the M1C as their official sniper rifle in 1951. The U.S. Navy has also used the Garand, rechambered for the 7.62x51mm NATO round.


The T20E2 selective fire prototype was designed to feed from 20-round BAR magazines.
Two interesting variants that never saw service were the M1E5 and T26 (popularly known as the Tanker Garand). The M1E5 is equipped with a folding buttstock, while the T26 uses the standard solid stock, and has a shorter, 18-inch barrel. The Tanker name was also used after the war as a marketing gimmick for commercially-modified Garands. Another variant that never saw duty was the T20E2. This variant is a Garand modified to accept Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) magazines, and has selective fire capability, with semi- and fully-automatic modes.
The T26 arose from requests by various Army combat commands for a shortened version of the standard M1 rifle for use in jungle or mobile warfare. In July 1945 Col. William Alexander, former staff officer for Gen. Simon Buckner and a new member of the Pacific Warfare Board,[38] requested urgent production of 15,000 carbine-length M1 rifles for use in the Pacific theater.[39][40][41][42] To emphasize the need for rapid action, he requested the Ordnance arm of the U.S. 6th Army in the Philippines to make up 150 18" barreled M1 rifles for service trials, sending another of the rifles by special courier to U.S. Army Ordnance officials at Aberdeen as a demonstration that the M1 could be easily modified to the new configuration.[39][41][43][44] Although the T26 was never approved for production, at least one 18" barreled M1 rifle was used in action in the Philippines by troopers in the 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment (503rd PIR).[44]
During the 1950s, Beretta produced Garands in Italy at the behest of NATO, by having the tooling used by Winchester during World War II shipped to them by the US government. These rifles were designated Model 1952 in Italy, and eventually led to variants of their own, the best known of these being the BM59 series.
The M1 Garand became the standard U.S. service rifle in 1936, but the former standard M1903 Springfield continued in use. The M1903A4 model Springfield was a bolt action sniper rifle that remained in use for years due to its superior performance. The U.S. rifle M1C or M1D (Sniper's) is the standard U.S. rifle M1 with telescope M81, M82, or M84 mounted on the receiver and a cheek pad laced to the stock. The cone shaped flash hider M2 or prong flash hider T37 is furnished as an accessory with the M1C and M1D models. The 1952 Marine version of the M1C had a different scope and flash hider. The M1C and M1D sniper versions of the M1 Garand were standardized in 1944. The M1C was used late in World War II and was the main sniper weapon for the U.S. Army in Korea. Few M1D models were produced before the end of World War II. Many standard M1s were converted to M1D during the Korean War, but few made it to that war. During the early years of the Vietnam War, the M1D was the official U.S. Army sniper rifle until it was replaced in the mid-1960s by the M-21 7.62mm Sniper Rifle.

M1 Carbine .30 caliber rifle is a semi-auto magazine fed rifle made by several manufacturers (Mine is
Underwood.) This rifle was issued to some troops during WWII. I have several 15 and 30 round
magazines and the bayonet that goes with it.

The M1 carbine (formally the United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1) is a lightweight semi-automatic carbine that became a standard firearm in the U.S. military during World War II and the Korean War, and was produced in several variants. It was widely used by U.S. and foreign military and paramilitary forces, and has also been a popular civilian firearm.
In selective fire versions capable of fully-automatic fire, the carbine is designated the M2 carbine. The M3 carbine was an M2 with an active infrared scope system.
Unlike conventional carbines, which are generally a version of a parent rifle with a shorter barrel (like the earlier .30-40 U.S. Krag rifle and carbine and the later M16A1 rifle and M4 carbine), the M1 carbine has one part in common with the M1 rifle (a short buttplate screw) and fires a different cartridge.

Savage British Enfield .303 rifle (US PROPERTY) marked was manufactured during WWII through the
US Army contract and lend/leased to its British allies. I purchased it from Gunbrokers.com for $250.00
In 2009.
Savage produced Lee-Enfield No. 4 Mk I*
In the late 1930’s, hordes of aggressors swarmed over Europe, South East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The land was plundered for raw materials such as oil, lumber, and the ore to produce steel, copper, aluminum etc. Businesses and private property was confiscated without due process. Outrages were directed against women & girls. By the millions, men, women & children were simply slaughtered out of hand. Slave labor camps & factories were set up. Many were subject to hideous medical experiments, or murdered by the testing of new biological and chemical weapons. The aggressors claimed religious, racial, ethnic, or national differences made their victims “less then human”.
Since the end of the Great Depression, Americans had been enjoying an era of prosperity. The news media of the day, radio and newspapers, dutifully covered the events transpiring across the world. (Note 1) While all agreed the intentions and actions of the axis powers were immoral & shameful, many in the U.S. felt we had neither a moral or legal right to interfere in the business of other nations. They, the isolationists, thought the problems of Europeans, Asians and those residing in the Pacific had no bearing on the lives of Americans. They flatly stated we had no business taking a pro-active role in such activities. They further said the stability, or lack of stability in other nations did not affect the livelihood or security of Americans.
They pointed out that Japan had always been an Imperialistic society. They reminded Americans that the German people lawfully elected Adolph Hitler to office. So, how could we justify more then a passing interest in such matters? Besides, they argued, wasn’t that the job of the League of Nations? (Note 2) Also, WWI had ushered in the era of modern warfare. Death could be brought in new & horrifying ways to soldiers, on a scale never even imagined. The trenches were frightening places. The last thing many wanted was for Americans to be dragged into this new fray. It was also pointed out, and quite truthfully, that the US forces had been drastically reduced by the Congress after WWI. Also the Senate Appropriations Committee had failed to provide funding for new, modern equipment. Most of the US Army Air Corps planes were WWI bi-planes.
Many in the US Military and US Government knew that sooner or later the US would be dragged into the war. They especially wanted the UK to remain free of the Nazi yolk. US Forces would need a base to operate from when it came time to launch an invasion of Western Europe. The British Isles were a perfect jumping off spot. The short trip across the English Channel would keep troops fresh for the battle that lay ahead. However, the US was not at war with either Germany or Japan at this point. Since the United States was officially “neutral”, the Neutrality Act of 1939 forbade “direct involvement” in the war; our allies were technically on their own. How could we help, but not violate the law?
Crafty politicians & lawyers in Washington read the law extensively, and wrote a bill to give the president the power to put the vast industrial base of the US at the disposal of our allies, but not have to declare war, or have war declared on us by the axis. Thus, the LEND LEASE ACT OF 1941 came into being. Because the war material supplied was “officially” US PROPERTY, and so marked, it managed to squeak past the benchmark of an outright violation of neutrality. Thus, the US managed to keep our allies supplied with war material, yet, still remain on the correct side of US and international law (though just barely).


Remington Model 11 12 Gauge semi-automatic shotgun. These guns were used throughout WWII, The Korean War and Viet Nam. The gun has the Military Ordnance flaming bomb and Military Finish, but has been re-blued and recoil pad added.

The Model 11 is the most common WWII shotgun encountered today. The long barrel version was commonly used for target practice in training aerial gunners and keeping officers occupied as clay sport shooting had become very popular during this time frame. It is worth noting that there are arsenal refurbished parkerized versions of the Model 11 Riot and Target versions out there but they are rare, most of them appear to have had the arsenal markings added to the left side of the receiver, these arsenal marked rebuilds are rarer than the factory originals and would be a great addition to any collection.

Model US44 Mossberg .22LR caliber 8 shot bolt action magazine fed target rifle.
This rifle is marked “US Property” and was used during the WWII Era as a US Army competition rifle.
I purchased it for $75.00 from the CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program), formerly the DCM.
The 44US was designed exclusively for the war department as a target trainer, intended solely for use by U.S. troops. It was adapted from the pre-war 44B model, and included adaptations like those made to the 42MB -- made mostly to keep costs down. The war department wanted an accurate, dependable, heavy-barreled trainer, and was willing to sacrifice cosmetic detail to make it affordable. While the 44B featured a deluxe, genuine walnut stock with long beavertail and cheek piece, the 44US stock was plain, usually birch with walnut finish. The four-position (adjustable) front swivel plate was removed, and both front and rear swivels were fixed, on the 44US. The hooded front sight was replaced by a plain post, the rear sight was the S-100, originally adjustable forward and back through four sets of screw positions (later reduced to three and then two). The first batch was shipped with Lyman 57MS receiver peep hole sight.

Valkerie made a semi only version of the M3 Grease gun once but i cant find one (i only do semi-auto).

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