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-   -   Another Garand from the CMP (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f37/another-garand-cmp-96601/)

xring3 09-05-2013 04:32 PM

Another Garand from the CMP
 
Yesterday the Fed Ex driver delivered what will probably be my last Garand from the CMP as political and collector demand will probably dry up the source of these historical items. Guess I am fortunate that it only took 9 months for delivery given todays demands. Anyway, there is once again no disappointment with the product. Field grade, muzzle reading +1, throat reading +2. Stock appears to be walnut and has an interesting cartushe. It is a H&R with a HRA 3-55 barrel. Most parts are marked HRA. No really bad stock wear and most dents can be steamed out..no big nasty gouges..light sanding and linseed oil should finish the job. Overall very pleased. Have never been disappointed with field grade M1's. :)

Sniper03 09-05-2013 08:06 PM

xring,

I also picked up a Garand at Camp Perry this year at the National Matchs. It is a Winchester but does have one pretty decent sized gouge in it from being stored in a bundle of rifles. 5/8 in by 1/4" and about 1/4 deep. I was told the barrel was worth more than I paid for the entire rifle? Build date Jan. 1944. I have been gently working on the stock with Acetone since the oil used on it has gotten very dark thick and dull. I would be interested in someone to write an article about steaming out dents in rifle stocks. I think it would be benificial for those on the Forum. Congradulations on your find!

03

Orlando 09-05-2013 10:34 PM

Steaming only works for shallow dents. Anything deep or if wood fibers have been crushed or broken it doesnt work

xring3 09-05-2013 10:47 PM

I am by no means an expert woodworker however, this is what I do. I strip the old finish off (some think this is criminal..but it is my property now). Next, I lightly (remember LIGHTLY) sand the stock. Run a damp cloth over entire stock and let dry (this will bring out fibers that look like hair) then knock them off with finishing paper of 0000 steel wool. Repeat this till you get tired of doing it. I then use a steam iron (not the one that your wife uses..well, my wife does not use an iron anymore..stock iron was purchased at an auction for a few bucks). Take the damp cloth previously used place on area to be lifted, put hot iron on cloth and leave for 15 to 30 seconds. Check dent, try till results are achieved. When dents are fixed and stock is dry use 0000 steel wool again. Before applying finish make sure sanding dust is removed with a tac cloth. Apply the finish you desire. May not be the perfect or best way but it does work. MHO. You may also want to check some of the woodworking forums for other ways. BTW...I have pulled out some pretty deep dents and even those with broken fibers..just takes time.

Orlando 09-05-2013 10:52 PM

Take a straight pin and poke several holes in the dent, this will help steam to get under the dent and swell wood fibers and raise it.
Dont expect alot of results the first time around,you may need to work on the same dent several days in a row.
Again steaming will do litlle to nothing for deep dents

DrFootball 09-06-2013 02:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Orlando
Take a straight pin and poke several holes in the dent, this will help steam to get under the dent and swell wood fibers and raise it.
Dont expect alot of results the first time around,you may need to work on the same dent several days in a row.
Again steaming will do litlle to nothing for deep dents

That's right! thats exactly what they teach in Smithing school. Very sad that the program was killed.


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