Stevens 12 ga restoration
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Old 04-07-2014, 05:03 PM   #1
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Default Stevens 12 ga restoration

All the restorations I have posted lately have begun with a bit of background or history about the gun about to be restored. Unfortunately that wont be the case with this 100 year old single shot 12 ga because I don’t know what it is beyond the fact that it’s a Stevens and it was made between 1900 and 1916. Based on the low number I suggest its on the earlier end of that range. I asked for help identifying this gun on a variety of boards and so far I have only been able to rule out guns that it is not.

Its not a Stevens 125, 115 or 105 or 107 or a 94 and a long list of others that it is not. This is proving to be a problem since locating a replacement stock for a 100 year old gun you don’t know the model number of is tough. I picked up the shotgun at an estate sale because it looked like a challenge. (I love those) and the price was right.

Like other restorations it’s a mess but I like to take what are essentially $10 guns and put 30 or 40 hours and $100 into them and turn them into $15 guns. (it’s a sickness, I know) It doesn’t have to make sense it only has to be enjoyable.

So here it is in all its broken glory.











Thats a brass screw above the firing pin even though the years have given it a black petina.





The thing about identifying this make is the joint were the stock meets the receiver. Most of the advertising (that can be found) shows a crescent shape in the stock/receiver joint like this. As well as a screw head for a removable screw at the front of the receiver where the barrel pivots.



But this make has a straight joint and no removable pin for the barrel pivot.



It also has a checkered stock and only certain Stevens of this vintage had that. But as you can see, both the butt and fore arm stock need replacing. For this gun I would rather buy a replacement than make one since spring his here and I have lots of outdoor tasks to take on.



If you are a Steven authority and can shed some light on this gun, please do so. I don’t know if it helps but there are no internal coil springs in the receiver. All the springs are flat stock.







And this is how the fore stock mounts.



The barrel lug



Normally I start with the wood due to dry times of the finish but for this one I have no wood so it may remain an incomplete restoration until I learn more about which make this gun is so as to locate a stock.

At any rate, Ziploc bags of naval jelly have their work cut out for them.



To be continued…..

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Old 04-07-2014, 05:23 PM   #2
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Looking forward to the rest of this thread I love reading your restorations and am in the process of finding my own gem in the rough to try my hand at restoring. One idea did you think it might be a prototype model? I mean it looks so similar to some of the other models you mentioned that unless you really look you can't tell at a glance. Maybe the estate you bought it from one of the family members might of had some connection to the company to receive a prototype or one off model.


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Old 04-07-2014, 05:30 PM   #3
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I picked the brain of a living relative of the late owner. The guns were his late fathers and grandfathers. The late owner had 7 sisters who know nothing of the guns.I was speaking to a brother in law of the late owner. I may be able to buy a stock for another make and modify it to work on this gun. THat is an option but would prefer the correct stock of course.

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Old 04-07-2014, 06:36 PM   #4
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Man this is a tough one I have not much to do today so I have been googling like crazy trying to help and every single break action single shot 12 gauge from them has that half moon style stock joint except the hammerless models. Its frustrating I can't even imagine how frustrating it is for you. I have a feeling your gonna have to end up making one for this restoration. I still think that this one was a one off shotgun perhaps as an experimental model because the only ones I see that have that straight edge are either hammerless or the double barrels they produced.

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Old 04-07-2014, 09:04 PM   #5
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http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=406133811
Looks much newer, but has flat joint, though otherwise very different.


Now this one, it's VERY close to my untrained eye. http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=406978889 Maybe the seller knows more?
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Old 04-07-2014, 10:49 PM   #6
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Thanks but its neither. Both are far more current than the one I am restoring. I combed all the gun auction sites and found those and others. hte one you listed have different features and one even has a secrial number and well as different info stamped on the gun denoting a different era. The receiver stamping on mine indicates it was made between 1900 and 1916 (at which point receivers were stamped with diff info.

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Old 04-07-2014, 10:59 PM   #7
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Have you considered the research value of séances?



Good luck!

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Old 04-08-2014, 12:53 AM   #8
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Savage has a model Finder. You simply type the serial number into a text box and you will at least get the years that sequence of serial numbers was used. Before Savage bought the Stevens brand Stevens merged with other manufacturers and was sold more than once.

I have a Savage/Fox Model B that isn't quite as old as yours. I don't know the year it was made but the gun design was patented in 1931. The B model is incredibly durable. The chances are if you see a SxS on a skeet range it is a version of the fox shotgun. There are other SxS double barrels that have withstood the test of time but none of them got prettier with care like a fox.

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Old 04-08-2014, 03:01 AM   #9
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Thanks but sadly there are no serial numbers or modle numbers on this gun. The clover and the 55 are the only markings. I do know it was made between 1900 and 1916 and while the date is interesting the make is what I am searching for.

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Old 04-08-2014, 03:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orangello View Post
Have you considered the research value of séances?



Good luck!
I have already tried the magic 8 ball and a Ouija board and have been breaking open fortune cookies looking for an answer so yes I am open to all options at this point.
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