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Old 03-12-2014, 09:29 PM   #41
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I would if it was economical, but it's simply not for the reason of labor v material cost. A blank runs about 100 dollars, but the wood from the blank costs about 15 to 20. I'll not pay 80 bucks for something I can do myself with a hand saw.
You'll need a lot more than a handsaw. You can't even fit a stock to a Klingon Disrupter without several tools and scrapers. For example, I just got a set of old tools from my dentist (free) so that I can tease away wood fibbers inside a recess when I need to. Turns out they have some neat precision stuff that they use to torture patients and, when they are n/g for their work, will probably give away if you ask.

You have a point in going at your first project with cheap wood, tho. I have wrecked a couple of walnut stocks in the course of my mostly self-taught education. It would be easier to throw a piece of cheap wood in the trash.
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Old 03-12-2014, 09:35 PM   #42
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I'll not pay 80 bucks for something I can do myself with a hand saw.
Soo, you can dry, age, cut, shape, mill, measure, and QC with a hand saw?

One thing you are going to do, if you "save" yourself "80$":

Your own Research and Development.

Methinks that "80$" is going to pay for a lot more than some

"hand-sawing".

But if you are intent upon making the first of many custom

stocks, for yourself, this is as good a way of starting as any.
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Old 03-12-2014, 09:46 PM   #43
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IMO, a piece of cheap wood would be a good practice material to learn on, but for the actual stock, i think i would invest in something of a bit higher quality, considering the time and effort involved. IMO, $100 for a blank of nice walnut isn't that expensive.

i would practice on something cheap to build the skillset needed to do the job and then do the real one in a good quality peice of hardwood.
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Old 03-16-2014, 09:45 PM   #44
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Oh my LORD! I know you could probably spend $100 on a blank, but I'd just go get a piece for less than $40. It may not be figured, but it would still be nice.
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Old 03-19-2014, 06:21 AM   #45
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Look at Bois d'Arc. AKA Osage Orange.
Better have some SHARP tools. Bodark is beyond hard. A few years back, we were cutting a 2" thick log into 6" sections for a project. That wood tore a few of the carbide teeth off that blade.
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Old 03-19-2014, 06:29 AM   #46
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I would tend to agree with Clr8ter, hobby woodworker here as well. I wouldn't compare myself to Norm Abram or probably even Clr8ter but I think I know enough to agree with him. As I stated early on "use pine if you must but I think you will quickly regret using cedar" or at least I said something like that. In my experience, cedar tends to have a crack factor under abuse.


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Yep, ceder will definitely crack easily. Especially under heat and/or stress.

I would not recommend any kind of soft wood for a gun stock. Especially something like Pine. Beech, Maple, Walnut, ect are all MUCH better choices.
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Old 03-19-2014, 01:32 PM   #47
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Default Tweeners..................

You should be looking at something thats inbetween hard and soft. I had a friend that his grand paw had made a stock and fore arm for a single shot 12 ga. He used the wood from a china ball tree..........No splits or cracks. I've heard that it's not so much the wood, but the process of curing. You can go all out and use bamboo with a little help. Its stronger than steel and light weight.............
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Old 03-19-2014, 07:45 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by mattybock View Post
I would if it was economical, but it's simply not for the reason of labor v material cost. A blank runs about 100 dollars, but the wood from the blank costs about 15 to 20. I'll not pay 80 bucks for something I can do myself with a hand saw.

At the end of the day I'll just have to preform an experiment using pine and cedar both as stock material and just see where that gets me. If it turns out to;
- not split at the breech upon 20 shots
- not split at the forearm upon 20 shots
- not twist or warp badly after 3 weeks time
- take a varnish finish well, over a stain
- not cause undo tear-out under a rasp and chisel

then the wood passes muster. If the wood just dings up easily, then that's not a big issue as far as I'm conserned.
Post pics of the project.
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