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mattybock 02-25-2014 10:50 PM

softest acceptable wood
 
Here's the straight and narrow of it; there is no hardwood anywhere near me. Lots of pine, lots of cedar, and that's it. I am not driving 150 miles to Arkansas on a gamble just to see worm eaten hardwood letovers.

So, what would happen if I used pine or cedar? Would it split down to the comb and cost me an eye? Would it tear the fabric of reality and invert the universe? Or would it just ding up real easy and not look very nice at all?

mountainman13 02-25-2014 10:54 PM

What are you building?

better judged by twelve than carried by six.

mattybock 02-25-2014 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mountainman13 (Post 1516383)
What are you building?

better judged by twelve than carried by six.

This the stock to a kentucky long rifle. Is it potentially dangerous or just cheap looking?

mountainman13 02-25-2014 11:21 PM

Cheap looking. Pine or cedar should easily handle the recoil. You may have warping issues and run into knots while working on it. Should be fine though.

better judged by twelve than carried by six.

hiwall 02-25-2014 11:32 PM

You will likely have trouble with the inletting also.
Soft wood is a poor choice. Go to the lumber yard and see if they have any hardwood.

mattybock 02-26-2014 12:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hiwall (Post 1516425)
You will likely have trouble with the inletting also.
Soft wood is a poor choice. Go to the lumber yard and see if they have any hardwood.

well that's the trick of it. There aren't any. Lots of saw mills who do god knows what with what they cut, which is probably all pine. I'm going to do two things;
- experiment with the recoil absobing abilities and durability of a softwood stock
- see what it's going to cost to order wood from up north

c3shooter 02-26-2014 12:17 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Attachment 137399

This will not end well........

Pine/cedar will be too soft for screws and pins. If you are willing to whittle, you can order a stock blank of properly cured walnut, oak, maple, etc. takes a while for that stuff to properly cure so that it does not check, split, crack.

There are good reasons that smiths did not use pine- and it was not for the looks.

hiwall 02-26-2014 02:21 AM

Buy online.

http://www.woodworkerssource.com/
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/mail-ordered-wood/
http://www.onlinelumberstore.com/

The pine could work for you. I assume you have a table saw. Cut the the pine wood in one eighth inch thick pieces. Reassemble but turn every other piece end for end and then epoxy the pieces together. Then it will likely be adequate to use(maybe).

DIY_guy 02-26-2014 02:37 AM

I would not use pine even if you soaked the wood in minwax wood hardener. Order wood online or cut apart a hardwood table for the wood. You can find garage sale tables to reclaim the wood or wait till the neighbor heads off to work and take one that he isnt using at the moment. :)

therewolf 02-26-2014 02:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 1516493)

This will not end well........

Pine/cedar will be too soft for screws and pins. If you are willing to whittle, you can order a stock blank of properly cured walnut, oak, maple, etc. takes a while for that stuff to properly cure so that it does not check, split, crack.

I'd be more worried about uncured, unseasoned wood, than the particular

species. Even if you found an Oak, or Walnut, the fresh wood will let

you down.


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