Single shotgun-rife project
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Single shotgun-rife project


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Old 01-25-2014, 12:11 AM   #1
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Default Single shotgun-rife project

For years, I have wanted to mount a rifle barrel on my 1893 Remington single-barrel receiver. (You're not really going to expect me to have a reason, are you?) The plan includes a .401 bore barrel chambered for .38-40.

I am thinking along two differing approaches, but both have me trying to figure a good/uncomplicated way to attach the locking lug block to the barrel or a block that the barrel would screw into.

With that background, I'd like to hear some thoughts about how much and what sort of forces are applied to the lug/hinge block at ignition and immediately after.

It seems to me, the only direct unbalanced forces on a barrel are the friction of the projectile in the bore and the recoil of the receiver yanking the barrel backward (because the barrel is connected to the receiver).

Some old guns--such as my '93--have the lug silver soldered to the barrel. On more "modern" guns, such as a Stevens 107/Springfield 94, there is some way of attachment that is not obvious.

I'd consider welding the lug/hinge block, but if I do, I will have to V out the weld area and then mill or grind away any build up.

Ideas please?

Last edited by jdsingleshot; 01-25-2014 at 02:50 AM.
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Old 01-25-2014, 01:10 AM   #2
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.410 for a 38-40? Did you mean .401?
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Old 01-25-2014, 02:49 AM   #3
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.410 for a 38-40? Did you mean .401?
Yep. Sorry. Fixed it.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:40 PM   #4
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Or instead, buy a Savage model 24. They got all kinds of versions and with the money you save you can go to MC Ace and have them make you some custom barrel adaptors. Just a thought.
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Old 02-13-2014, 06:03 PM   #5
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The 38/40 is obviously a very mild round. I doubt you would have a problem.
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Old 02-14-2014, 01:34 PM   #6
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Or instead, buy a Savage model 24. They got all kinds of versions and with the money you save you can go to MC Ace and have them make you some custom barrel adaptors. Just a thought.
Guess I'm missing something. How will I save money by buying something when I already have the barrel and the shotgun, would do the gunsmithing myself and will make the chamber reamer? I would certainly save time, but I'm retired and have time to spare.

Also, my longtime interest in this has been in the making, not in the having.

One drawback is that from this perspective in life, I do realize that this kind of project is only a distraction from things that matter. So maybe my remaining interest will completely dissipate before I really get started...
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Old 02-14-2014, 03:16 PM   #7
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High strength silver solder should be more then strong enough for what your.thinking if in reading it right. With welding you run a very high chance of damaging any heat treatment the metal may have. Silver solder you dont. I know most parts on old hinged shotguns were. Silver soldered I'm not 100% sure the breach blocks were. If they can take a 12 or 10 gauge then I'm guessing it will stand up to a .38-40. Check with a good Smith to be exactly sure.

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Old 02-15-2014, 02:36 PM   #8
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High strength silver solder should be more then strong enough for what your.thinking if in reading it right. With welding you run a very high chance of damaging any heat treatment the metal may have. Silver solder you dont... .

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Yes, the breach locking block on the Remington is silver soldered to the barrel. As far as welding changing the heat treatment, two ideas are at work. First, barrels are not hardened. Second, I would probably cut a slice off the end of the barrel and experiment welding that to see about warping. I would also see if that slice could be hardened by heating and quenching, which would tell me what might happen by the barrel mass sucking the heat out of a welded area.

I guess I'm leaning toward welding because I don't have the torch I would need to silver solder that much mass.

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Old 02-15-2014, 03:53 PM   #9
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Well I already got ripped on once here for putting in my two cents, but if you weld you can heat the whole mass with that torch no? Or another thought would be to to compare the existing barrel to what's already out there in comparable callers and with a little grinding get it to fit. I do think Winchester made a single shot 38-40 since I've seen replicas, but I forget the action style... Might be worth a loom tho.
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Old 02-15-2014, 05:39 PM   #10
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I did something similar a while back. I had most of an old Stevens action and I fitted a 22 barrel on it. With no recoil to worry about with the 22 round I just screwed the lug to the bottom of the barrel. I did have to move the firing pin of course because the 22 was a rimfire. Here is a pic of the mostly finished project. The stock and forearm came from and old Stevens bolt action 22 (one-piece stock) which I cut in half and fitted to the frame.
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