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-   -   rust removal on barrel, tips? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f35/rust-removal-barrel-tips-93655/)

MillionDollarShooter 07-10-2013 01:11 AM

rust removal on barrel, tips?
 
So my old cooey model 75 barrel is fairly rusty and I want to polish is and reblue it. Its only a .22 but its just a small project that can take up my evening. Anyways, long story short, I was thinking about using a sanding disk or a flapper wheel (air tool) ever so lightly to remove the rust and old blueing (if there is any) and get it down to a stainless steel look then polish it and reblue or maybe just use a metal polish to shine it up. Like i said its just a .22 so it doesnt have to be show room quality, just something thatll look nice in the rack. I'm not really knowledgeable with brands of polish or anything so im open to suggestions!

c3shooter 07-10-2013 02:44 AM

First, welcome to the forum. Stop over by the intro section and say hi.

Metal prep is 95% of a good refinish. Bluing does not cover up rough metal.

MOST power tools used by a novice gunsmith are too aggressive. Would suggest use of wet-or-dry type sandpaper- starting at around 150, going gradually to about 400.

Do this by hand, wetting the paper with some light oil. Clamp the barrel in a padded vise, work it lengthwise, next finer grade across the barrel like a shoe shine rag, next finer lengthwise, etc.

Bluing is a form of controlled rust (black iron oxide instead of red) If you do not protect the raw steel in some way, it will begin to rust within minutes or hours. Simply leaving it with a high polish will not work unless it is in a tank of oil or wax.

There are spray on and bake coatings, such as Cerracote. There are also cold bluing products that chemically produce a thin blue (I like Blue Wonder, and 5 other people will name 7 different products). Immediately prior to use, AFTER doing the last polish, degrease the metal (alcohol will work) warm the metal (hair dryer will work) and apply the bluing (DO NOT USE STEEL WOOL) Follow makers directions. If you don't like the look, take it off (Naval Jelly) and start again.

Power tools tend to round sharp edges, dish out screw holes, screw up markings- or (felony warning) obliterate serial numbers. Skip the power tools. Really.

Axxe55 07-10-2013 02:49 AM

C3 is quite right and IMO, the less course the method the better. use only what is needed to achieve the results you are looking for.

and like C3 said on the power tools, i agree. more often than not, they will do more damage than fix.

BTW, welcome the forum and please post some pictures of the rifle.

hiwall 07-10-2013 03:06 AM

c3shooter's method is great. Another way is to use strips of fine grit emery cloth and use a shoe-shine stroke. Always use as fine of grit as you can to do the job you need done(to start), then keep using finer grits until you get the finish you desire.

MillionDollarShooter 07-10-2013 05:41 AM

Thanks alot! Nice to see the forum has good people! I will certainly update you with pictures when I am done (however long that may take). Thank you again!

spottedpony 07-10-2013 06:59 PM

for surface rust, I use breakfree and 0000 steel wool. the rust usually comes off with little or no damage to the bluing.
for removing pits and polishing the metal start with the finest grit you can, the finer the scratches your abrasive makes, the less it takes to remove them. Dont necessarily stop at 400 grit, keep going finer and finer until you reach the level of polish on the raw steel you wish to see.

MillionDollarShooter 07-10-2013 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 1300035)
First, welcome to the forum. Stop over by the intro section and say hi.

Metal prep is 95% of a good refinish. Bluing does not cover up rough metal.

MOST power tools used by a novice gunsmith are too aggressive. Would suggest use of wet-or-dry type sandpaper- starting at around 150, going gradually to about 400.

Do this by hand, wetting the paper with some light oil. Clamp the barrel in a padded vise, work it lengthwise, next finer grade across the barrel like a shoe shine rag, next finer lengthwise, etc.

Bluing is a form of controlled rust (black iron oxide instead of red) If you do not protect the raw steel in some way, it will begin to rust within minutes or hours. Simply leaving it with a high polish will not work unless it is in a tank of oil or wax.

There are spray on and bake coatings, such as Cerracote. There are also cold bluing products that chemically produce a thin blue (I like Blue Wonder, and 5 other people will name 7 different products). Immediately prior to use, AFTER doing the last polish, degrease the metal (alcohol will work) warm the metal (hair dryer will work) and apply the bluing (DO NOT USE STEEL WOOL) Follow makers directions. If you don't like the look, take it off (Naval Jelly) and start again.

Power tools tend to round sharp edges, dish out screw holes, screw up markings- or (felony warning) obliterate serial numbers. Skip the power tools. Really.

What kind if oil would you suggest? And length wise? Some people say around the barrel and some say length wise, what would happen if you went around the barrel?

hiwall 07-10-2013 10:05 PM

Quote:

What kind if oil would you suggest? And length wise? Some people say around the barrel and some say length wise, what would happen if you went around the barrel?
Any oil-your car oil will work but finer oil is often used.
You can go any way you want. If it was buffed by professional they often go at a diagonal.

Thatmoonshiner 08-03-2013 05:06 AM

Rust is easily removed by sanding it down then using naval jelly to remove the rest, if you want to kill two birds with one stone, Birchwood-Casey makes a bluing/rust remover which will remove both and save you money on the reblue. With rust however comes pitting usually to remove that, clamp your gun in a vide and use the sandpaper in a shoestring movement. Here's a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUpVrKwuxMg


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