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Old 04-02-2014, 12:29 AM   #11
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The view from below after some further shapeing of the wrist around the lower tang.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A replacement stock will usually be 1/16" or more larger than you want it. Thats good for fitting a buttplate.
To remove burrs that developed on the inside edge of the buttplate during the initial install and to establish
the final size and shape of the steel buttplate and subsequantly the stock, reverse the direction of cut as shown
and lift the tail of the file. This puts a slight bevel on the cut, removeing the inside burr on the buttplate and
pareing the stock into a taper that you'll extend from the butt forward during final shapeing. When finished,
go around the buttplate parallel with the file to remove the bevel and establish the edge of the buttplate
perfectly parallel with the line of the wood that will be carried forward to the wrist. The buttplate will come to
its final shape at this time and dictate the final shape of the stock. Strive for a pleasing shape.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The size of the bevel being placed on the buttend of the stock shows how much wood is excess to allow for some
shapeing and final fitting.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A little finger under the end of the 12" long file is about the right angle for establishing the final shape of the buttplate.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

And here, most of the rough work done. Its pretty much shapeing and final sanding now.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:30 AM   #12
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This is very dense and dark walnut. Read that hard. Hand sanding the initial shape and form is out of the
question. Off to jitter bug land. But we'll start with 120 to move the shape to perfection slowely and to
prevent lots of swirrlies that have to be hand sanded out later. The key? Keep it moveing, use the entire
pad and don't tip onto an edge and create a gouge. Nice flat surface running forward from the properly
shaped butt to the wrist.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Both sides power sanded to final shape and ready for handsanding and whiskering.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

If you don't wet the wood, sand off the whiskers and repeat untill the wood stays smooth when dried, it'll
whisker up thru the finish later with humidity or a rainy day hunt....finish destroyed at that point. A bit of
warm water and a low powered heat gun or hair dryer is what is needed to wet out the surface, swell the
damaged fibers from sanding so they stand up and can be sheared off at the surface of the stock. If you are
sanding thru to 600 or 800 grit, waisted time, fibers compressed into the wood, sealer won't penetrate and
seal and you put in unnecessary hours and still have a lumpy stock on a rainy day hunt. 220 to 320 grit for the
final sanding is plenty for 90% of gunstocks.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Wet the wood all over and start to force it dry with the heat gun. The formerly smooth stock will feel like its
just machined.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Lightly hand sand, with the grain useing 180 or 220 grit paper. Then wet and repeat. Remember, don't bring
the wood down below the tangs or action panels, two repetitions lightly sanded is usually plenty with the water....
save room for one more final sanding before the finish, see below.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

This or truoil is for the final sanding. Rub in a thin coat with yer hand. Rub hard till yer hand feels on fire and
the wood feels dry. Let it set up 4 to 8 hours and when dry, gently cut the surface and any remaing sanding
scratches that only slowely swell up in the whiskering process with worn 220 grit paper. After this, yer done
with sandpaper, all further rubbin is by hand, by 0000 steel wool and finaly with fff rubing compound for a dead
level finish that feels soft and has a satin glow.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The freezing/sealing coat rubbed in hard all over...we'll seal the inletting and under the buttplate later.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

See, couple marks that didn't come up till the sealer coat swelled em, the sealer is thinner than water and
penetrates better when rubbed in hard. These marks will come out too.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

This buttstock should be done in a day or so.
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:31 AM   #13
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Lets not make a new forend from the buttstock. Instead, lets save the original and keep this Ol Gal a bit closer to the
Teens or Twenties when she was first made.

The crack is not too bad...gently open it to inspect for too much oil. Gently so it dosn't spread before we can stop
drill the end of the crack.

The glue and the wood at room temperature, let it run into the crack and out thru the other side. Help the
coverage with toothpics as needed, coat the entire length of the crack all the way thru.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Finger as a putty knife, force glue in from the other side.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The wood will spring closed, an indication that the wood is still good, not punky or rotten, just dirty and abused.
A clamp made of gorilla tape is all it needs.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

I'll leave it set for 24 hours before doing any hole repairs and before sanding out the name Richard carved on the
Right Side Panel.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Not bad, I can see the end of the crack and know where to put my stop drill hole to prevent the crack from
spreading further.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A 1/8" hole bored thru to stop the crack...yep, another hole in the forend just behind where at least two sling
swivels previously cracked and tore out of the forend....be patient.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Its good, we stopped the crack before it gets to the forend bolt. Plenty of strength left in this old forend...another
100 years at least.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Basic supplies for this repair....if I was doing a wrist or the toe of a buttstock, I'd use Acraglas epoxie for a repair
stronger than the wood itself. This use of titebond will be at least as strong as the wood, if not more so for this low
impact, more decorative than anything else wooden part. Just a place to put yer hand and control the muzzle after all.
We won't put a sling swivel back in it either.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

I spread the crack a bit more, gently, even with a stop hole, its old, old wood and tender!

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:32 AM   #14
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The foreend work was accomplished last night, posted this AM...plenty of time to dry up solid, so, hole repairs.

We need some walnut plugs for a 100 year old forend and I have a ruined 100 yearold piece of walnut to cut them from...

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The remainder of this buttstock will be used either for old hole repair, ala more plugs or for knife scales. Either is a better choice than firewood.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

I gathered the sawdust from plug cutting and sanding, mixed it with tight bond and used a 1/8" rod to pack the stop drill hole full of nearly color
matching home made wood putty. Once set it'll be there forever and reinforces the crack end of the forend. The plugs are made and the
counterbored holes drilled in the forend. This provides a significant surface area in and across the crack where the sling swivel screws tore
out. Its also good for considerable additional strength and makes a fair looking repair...no sense tryin to pass this Ol Gale off as Original or
Brand New, 'sides, it goes with the character of the gun...some flaws expected in 100 years.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Paint the holes with titebond and paint the plugs and press them in...a twist to align the grain and a tap to seat them well.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A sharpe chisel and a small smasherwacker remove the bulk of the plugs.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

After a bit of light file work...once the glue is set tomorrow, this forend will be ready for final sanding and a complete refinish.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Third coat of finish is in the wood. This dense hard walnut buttstock took a bit of wet sanding with very fine paper
to not only level the first sealer coats but to polish out most of the 220g sanding stroaks from the burled sections near
the butt. Figured wood shows even 600g sanding marks...specially when its darn hard wood. Forend is not as pretty,
and still has some of its 100 years of blemishes but its saved and quite serviceable...its flaws tell of many squirrlies and
bunnies in the camp pot. But, finish on, finish dry, finish knocked level with 0000 steel wool and more finish on is the rule.
I use about 6 drops per side for each coating, rubbed in hard and then allowed to dry before leveling for the next coat.
Couple days work, mostly waitin for stock goo to dry. Soon it'll be time to put the wood away in a dent free zone and
start on the metal.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:33 AM   #15
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Just about done with the wood. Each coat of finish is leveled with 0000 steel wool...

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Leveling deglosses, thats good but even though leveling leaves the wood feeling smooth, only rubbing can make
it feel soft and fff will bring up a warm satin as opposed to a garish browning shine. I can't explain the soft feel,
but once you've felt it you know.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Still have to seal under the buttplate and the inletting but here's how it looks....almost good enough as is.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Metal prep on one this old is a matter of degrees. Short of a new barrel, it ain't gonna have a master shine.
Under all that patina (rust) is a very finely frosted set of parts. So, wire brush in a drill press does a nice job
blending to a satin finish for rust blueing.

Here the parts just off the wire brush, and staged for the first heavy application of pilkingtons.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

About 20 minutes into the first three hour soak and even with the humidity about 50% below where it oughta be for
fastest rust blackening, some color is starting to bloom evenly on these old parts. I'll likely move em inside and into a
damp box for the rest of the weekend just to get the process evened out and moveing at other than a snails pace.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

An the barrel? Also finely frosted with micropits so, rather than loose all the markings, a 100g jitterbug finish to blend
in a satin finish, clean the metal and sharpen up the old markings. Blueing will wait for a more humid time of the spring,
perhaps late march, early april when the garage is overing at least 60% humidity and 50+ degrees overnight.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

But in all, a fine working finish for an old gun that will see some use and lots of Eyeball time above the mantel. The action
will receive similar treatment and rust blueing as its just a bit too frosted to be worthy of a polished finish.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:34 AM   #16
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Into the hot water after the first rust cycle. All the parts nice red brown rusty ready to start becomeing grey and grey black then black...

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects


Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Lots of fluffly black to remove after the first boil. Grey and grey black underneath...these are comeing along quickly...

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A third rust cycle, parts thinly coated with pilkingtons and returned to the hot iron boiling pot with a cup of hot
water to raise the humidity....pan does double duty as boilerblackener and damp box on these less than humid days.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Old parts nicely blackened....about 5 rust boil card cycles....old steel works faster since there is no chrome or nickle to make the steel stain/rust resistant.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Buttplate installed with a simple coat of johnsons paste wax to seal the metal finish.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Looks pretty good...satiny just like the wood finish....and it dosn't look gaudy sportin gal new either...it shouldn't, its 100.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:35 AM   #17
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Temps up. Humidity is up. I'm home for a week or so...so back to this job - its rust blueing season in the South! Finally!

Stampings on the frame and barrel are very light...too light for strikeing and polish...the markings would mostly disappear...so,
derusting in preparation for a nice rust blue.

CLR, Full strength in a bucket.....let the steel soak...It works about like Brownells rust and blue remover...pretty much the
same stuff...you can run full strength or dilute it for even slower action.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

After a 10 minute soak and a light rubdown with 0000 steel wool, much of the "Patina" comes off. The surface is very finely
pitted, it'll look just fine once the rust is out and the steel is reoxidized black.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Gently, gently, its old. It won't be shiney new but we knew that up front. It will have all its original markings and it will be
a fine shooter for potting squirrlies and wabbits from time to time, and even for a bit of plinking in the back yard.

About an hour in the sauce and several rub downs with clean hunks of 0000 steel wool.

Most of the pitting is clear, 100 years of rust gone. About 30 more minutes and a good rinse and then
the first coat of rust bluing solution to begin building the new finish.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Finished soaking in CLR and buffing with 0000 steel wool. Pits and lettering are all cleaned out and the steel looks nice in a dull grey.
Ready for final rinse.

Hot water, hot as you can stand it, inside and out and get all the gunk and crud off the inside and outside. Ya could boil it too but use
a pot separate from the one you'd blue in...no sense contaminating the bluing pot.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

As with all rust bluing and bare metal, dry it fast to minimize unwanted coarse grained rust...see, this old iron is rusting right out of the
tap...it should blue nice and easy. A hot air gun makes quick work of water in the action ways and screw pockets that could later spot

Coming along quickly and somewhat evenly. Nicer than I expected for such an old piece. What you can't see is
inside the action ways and tang recesses where the bluing actually brings out the original case colors. Oh I wish
the action was in a bit better cosmetic shape, it would be lovely to rust blue this frame very lightly and have those
long faded case colors come back to life where they would be visible...but I think the "Patina" took them away on
the exterior long ago.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:36 AM   #18
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I think I'll let this first bite work overnight, perhaps into tomorrow evening before the first boil. The rust is coming
on strong though I have a bit of a light spot in the center if the right action panel...could be a hard spot, it looks like an
outline of very fine pitting. I'll see if I can't get it to even up some with aggressive rusting.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

First boil, a good bloom of rust on the steel/iron frame.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Fluffy red converted to fluffy black, most of this will buff off leaving a thin coat of battle ship grey ferroferric oxide. Just what I want, tightly bonded black iron oxide coming up slowly and beautiful and durable.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

A rub out with degreased 0000 steel wool removes the fluff leaving only the strongest bonds in place...overall, just as expected after the first boil, light battleship grey and even and ready for a coating of sauce and rusting till dinner time tonight.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The second of 5 to 7 boiling cycles for this old frame...tightly bound black oxide building with each cycle of coat, rust, boil, card, repeat.

Just water...filtered to remove sand and junk in the whole house filter. If ya have high chlorine ya might want to filter again with activated charcoal to prevent spotting or just use distilled water from the store. I just use good clean tap water and an iron pot to boil it in. Into the cool water, bring it to a boil and let it roll for 5 to 10 minutes to convert red iron oxide to black oxide.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Plenty of good black fluff on there...should be nice and even battleship grey under there now...very close to the halfway done point for bluing once a good battleship grey comes up. Hard metals, rust and blue slower, irons and softer metals faster. Slowest and hardest in my experience have been Marlin 336 mag tubes and Win 94 receivers. But with persistence they blue beautifully too. Plenty of loose oxides, only the ferroferric oxide is retained after carding with degreased 0000 steel wool.
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:37 AM   #19
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The fourth coat came up a bit more black than grey. Its good news. Thurs or Fri evening should see the frame done. The lever is on its first overnight rusting and should follow completion shortly after. Then on to the barrel and done.

Time to start assembly.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Lightly greasing all the newly rust blued parts with Rig grease and installing the trigger return spring and mainspring stud.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Loosely install the barrel screw.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The mainspring assembly, the lever is arched, arch go's up.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

With the hammer at half cock, install the lever and spring. The spring sleeve is pressed home and into the groove in the mainspring stud to capture the assembly.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Install the firing pin and its cross pin. Lightly stake the cross pin on both sides to capture it. Remember, its old, not a hard smack on the SmasherWacker, Medium smush is plenty to displace a bit of metal at the hole and capture the pin. Do both sides.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Install the hammer lever/lever link. Also, gently stake this new cross pin on both sides. Just a touch to keep the pin from sliding out to the side and tying up the action later if it becomes loose with age.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects
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Old 04-02-2014, 12:38 AM   #20
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And now its starting to come together...looking good. This old piece of highly figured walnut has a flaw or two to match the scuffs and pits in the barrel and action...a lil chip trying to come off at the toe of the lower tang...but its tight and I won't pry it out to glue it back in. To do so will tear good wood and the repair will still be visible after refinishing. Best to leave it alone, it'll mostly hide under the tip of the lever anyway.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The old iron or low grade steel action blued up a dark battleship grey. It looks black with grease on it but a good color none the less. I'm pleased...even the pitting and the scratch on the left panel looks "right" for this old gun.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

The very lightly stamped markings are much more visible with the new finish. Glad I did not polish, I would have lost these key markings and a bit of authenticity as well.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

I would love to have the rest of this tree for making stocks with.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Fine pitting on the right action panel, not bad at all.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Looks more like a proper and complete action now with the lever in place. Same process, install a new cross pin in the lower lever link hole and stake both sides lightly. Then, after some RIG Grease on the parts, install it in the frame with the extractor. If ya never fiddled the screws into place on an Old Favorite with the plunger extractor, yer in for a treat, specially with old threads and new blue...but its in and scratch free and all the tender threads in fine shape.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Ya can just see the little chip at the toe of the tang that popped up a bit while sittin and waitin for the metal to be done. Occupational hazard with old or highly figured wood. Sometimes they dont' show a flaw till ya got em done. But its tight and I'll leave it alone.

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

From the right side

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

And then with the action open...

Rescuing Stevens Favorite - DIY Projects

Time to get some propane, a turkey fryer burner, a black iron tank and some water...got a barrel needs rustin.
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